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(09/04/2008) The Fallen by Juan Marse. Boston. 1979. Little Brown. Translated From The Spanish By Helen R. Lane. keywords: Literature Translated Spain. 334 pages. Jacket design by Paul Bacon. 0316546763.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   'In fact those kids' fantastic stories had their roots in a much more fantastic world than the one their imaginations created. ' A bestseller in Spain when censorship was lifted after Franco's death, The Fallen has been hailed as the most important Spanish novel written since the Spanish Civil War It is also the first of Juan Marse's internationally acclaimed novels to appear in English. Set on the streets of postwar Barcelona, the center of anti-Francoist sentiment, The Fallen is a Goyaesque fresco of corrupted lives, seen through the eyes of a gang of streetwise slum kids. They congregate in an unused air raid shelter on the grounds of Las Animas Convent to invent and trade stories: about the tubercular whore who used to run the town orphanage and the wealthy widow who is searching for her; about the widow's crippled son who will pay good money to watch acts of brutal sexual degradation and the spirited orphan girl who ministers devotedly to his needs; about the 'Red' soldier who is hiding from the authorities and the assassination attempts on the disheartened, factionalized underground; about the secret sexual and political tortures being administered in the old church crypt; and about Java, the ragpicker's son, who is learning how to sell information and himself. Through the youngsters' imaginary scenarios - spun out of the future as much as from any past memory or half-glimpsed present 'reality' - Marse recreates the sordid, macabre world of Barcelona in the aftermath of the Spanish Civil War, a world fraught with violence and corruption, yet interlaced with the fragile threads of friendship and imagination. A wondrous, moving tale, THE FALLEN creates a tragic legend of the children's lives, the secret perversions of the 'respectable' Falangist middle classes, and the last desperate hopes of the anti-Francoist underground. A native of Barcelona, Spain, Juan Marse began publishing stories in literary magazines in 1958, while working as an apprentice in a jewelry factory He has subsequently written five novels while working as a laboratory assistant in the Pasteur Institute in Pads, a scriptwriter, translator, journalist, publicity editor, waiter, and editor-in-chief for the magazine For Favor. His highly acclaimed works have won the Premio Sesamo for short stories, the Premio Biblioteca Breve and the Premio Planeta, as well as the Premio Internacional de Novela 'Mexico,' which THE FALLEN was awarded when it was first published in 1973.

Currently writing full-time, Marse lives with his wife and two children in Barcelona.

Helen R. Lane has received both NBA and PEN awards for her translations. She lives in France.

 

 

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(09/03/2008) Libra by Don Delillo. New York. 1988. Viking Press. keywords: Literature America. 456 pages. Jacket design by Neil Stuart. 0670823171. August 1988.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   In his eight previous novels, Don Delillo has taken on large tracts of the contemporary American experience and created a distinctive world where all the ambiguity, dread, and surpassing strangeness of our own time stand forth in high relief. In LIBRA, Delillo has given us the novel the shaken American psyche has been awaiting for twenty-five years - a superbly veracious, artistically impeccable, and eerily convincing fictional speculation of the events leading up to the assassination of John F. Kennedy. The antihero of LIBRA is Lee Harvey Oswald, who is as hauntingly real in the book as he was elusive to us in reality. Here he is, as large and as small as life - joining the Marines, poring over Marxist texts, defecting to Russia, taking a potshot at General Edwin Walker, handing out leaflets for the Fair Play for Cuba committee, imagining himself as an agent of history. Then, 'history' presents itself in the form of two disgruntled CIA operatives, who decide that an unsuccessful attempt on JFK's life, one that could be linked to Fidel Castro, is the only way to put Cuba back into geopolitical play - and that Oswald is the perfect instrument for their ambitions. We are plunged into the strange half-world of Bay of Pigs veterans, rogue agents, right-wing fanatics, Mafia thugs, the whole peculiar melange from which emerged the most shattering event of postwar history. Oswald's sign was Libra, the scales - and how he tilts will determine whether Dallas will be just another stop on the political itinerary or the locus of exploded American dreams.

 

 

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(09/02/2008) Autobiographies Of Orhan Pamuk: The Writer In His Novels by Michael McGaha. Salt Lake City. 2008. University Of Utah Press. keywords: Literature Turkey Translated Literary Criticism Biography. 200 pages. Cover photo of Orhan Pamuk by William Vasta. Jacket design by Jinni Fontana. 9780874809305.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   'Pamuk is a writer who shares my reverence for the great art of the novel. He takes the novel seriously in a way that is perhaps no longer possible for Western writers, boldly describing it as European civilization's greatest invention. ' - Michael McGaha. TURKISH NOVELIST ORHAN PAMUK is a prominent voice in Turkish literature, speaking to the country's history, culture, and politics. In 2006, he became the first Turkish writer to receive the Nobel Prize for Literature. AUTOBIOGRAPHIES OF ORHAN PAMUK is the first book-length study of the life and writings of Pamuk and provides historical and cultural context to help readers better understand and appreciate both the man and his work. It begins with a brief biography, outlines Pamuk's contributions to Turkish literature and history, and then examines how his art has evolved over the past thirty years, discussing some of the writers who provided inspiration. In addition to a thorough analysis of his seven published novels, including SNOW and MY NAME IS RED, an entire chapter is devoted to his first two novels, CEVDET BEY AND SONS and THE SILENT HOUSE, which have yet to be translated into English. Though his books deal with specifically Turkish issues, like all great literature the themes they explore are universal. This is a comprehensive examination of the Nobel laureate's work, free of jargon and of interest to anyone who enjoys good books.

Michael McGaha is the Yale B. and Lucille D. Griffith Professor of Modern Languages Emeritus at Pomona College. He has published fourteen previous books, including COAT OF MANY CULTURES: THE STORY OF JOSEPH IN SPANISH LITERATURE, 1200-1492.

 

 

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(08/31/2008) Madness & Civilization: A History Of Insanity In The Age Of Reason by Michel Foucault. New York. 1965. Pantheon Books. Translated from the French by Richard Howard. With an introduction by Dr. Jose Barchilon, Professor, Department of Psychiatry, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York. keywords: Psychology Philosophy History. 299 pages. Jacket design by Pan Visual. June 1965.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   During the Middle Ages insanity was in many respects considered a part of everyday life. Fools and madmen walked the streets much as they appear in the plays of Shakespeare and in Don Quixote. At some point in history, the West's attitude toward madness changed and these people began to be considered a threat. Asylums were built for the first time; madmen were put away, and an attempt was made to put a wall between the insane and the rest of humanity. In recent years the question of madness and how to define it has become the center of a great deal of discussion, partly social and psychological--reports show that a vast majority of New Yorkers are neurotic in varying degrees --but also judicial: how can one decide who is to be put away? This is the question that Dr. Foucault seeks to answer in an analysis of the history of madness from roughly 1500 to 1800. Basing himself on vast research into medical as well as theological thought, economics as well as literature, he has created a unique and highly relevant work, a masterpiece of research, understanding, and imagination.

 

 

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(08/30/2008) Blood On The Moon by James Ellroy. New York. 1984. Mysterious Press. keywords: Mystery Los Angeles. 263 pages. Jacket painting by Gamache. 0892960698.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Detective Sergeant Lloyd Hopkins loves his work, his family, women, and innocence. Preternaturally brilliant and with an extraordinary instinct for police work, Hopkins moves through the Los Angeles night world saving souls, while faced with the constant threat of losing his own. Someone else is stalking the city now - someone who can match Hopkins point for point in brilliance. But Teddy Verplanck has turned his mind to evil: he protects the innocent by murdering them. So successful has he been that in twenty years not one of his victims has been connected to another. Most are deemed suicides. Drawn inexorably together, Hopkins and Verplanck challenge each other in a confrontation which pits icy intelligence against white-heated madness and lays bare the souls of two men driven in opposite directions by the same need. Searing and shocking, as evocative of Los Angeles police work as the stories of Joseph Wambaugh and as compelling as the novels of Lawrence Sanders, Blood on the Moon is a frightening and exciting foray into the world of men driven by forces so strong they take over every life they touch.

 

 

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(08/29/2008) Either/Or - 2 Volumes by Soren Kierkegaard. Princeton. 1944. Princeton University Press. Volume 1 Translated From The Danish By David E. Swenson & Lillian Marvin Swenson. Volume 2 Translated From The Danish By Walter Lowrie. keywords: Literature Philosophy Denmark Translated 19th Century. Volume 1 - 387 pages, Volume 2 - 304 pages.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   This first English publication of Soren Kierkegaard's EITHER/OR nearly coincides with the centennial of its original Danish publication in 1843. Here is the first of Kierkegaard's important contributions to Danish literature, the one which established his fame as a writer. The occasion for the production of this remarkable book lay in his unhappy engagement to Regina Olsen and its subsequent breach. This experience constituted the determining factor which placed Kierkegaard in full possession of his aesthetic and literary powers. In these two volumes he has contrasted an ethical view of life with a purely aesthetic attitude. The 'aesthetist' is the author' of the first volume, and the 'ethicist' is responsible for the second. Soren Aabye Kierkegaard was a prolific 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian. Kierkegaard strongly criticized both the Hegelianism of his time, and what he saw as the empty formalities of the Danish church. Much of his work deals with religious problems such as faith in God, the institution of the Christian Church, Christian ethics and theology, and the emotions and feelings of individuals when faced with life choices. His early work was written under various pseudonyms who present their own distinctive viewpoints in a complex dialogue. Kierkegaard left the task of discovering the meaning of the works to the reader, because 'the task must be made difficult, for only the difficult inspires the noble-hearted'. Subsequently, many have interpreted Kierkegaard as an existentialist, neo-orthodoxist, postmodernist, humanist, individualist, etc. Crossing the boundaries of philosophy, theology, psychology, and literature, Kierkegaard came to be regarded as a highly significant and influential figure in contemporary thought. Kierkegaard has been called a philosopher, a theologian, the Father of Existentialism, a literary critic, a humorist, a psychologist, and a poet. Two of his popular ideas are 'subjectivity', and the 'leap to faith,' popularly referred to as the 'leap of faith. ' The leap of faith is his conception of how an individual would believe in God, or how a person would act in love. It is not a rational decision, as it is transcending rationality in favour of something more uncanny, that is, faith. As such he thought that to have faith is at the same time to have doubt. So, for example, for one to truly have faith in God, one would also have to doubt that God exists; the doubt is the rational part of a person's thought, without which the faith would have no real substance. Doubt is an essential element of faith, an underpinning. In plain words, to believe or have faith that God exists, without ever having doubted God's existence or goodness, would not be a faith worth having. For example, it takes no faith to believe that a pencil or a table exists, when one is looking at it and touching it. In the same way, to believe or have faith in God is to know that one has no perceptual or any other access to God, and yet still has faith in God. Kierkegaard also stressed the importance of the self, and the self's relation to the world as being grounded in self-reflection and introspection. He argued in Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments that 'subjectivity is truth' and 'truth is subjectivity. ' This has to do with a distinction between what is objectively true and an individual's subjective relation to that truth. People who in some sense believe the same things may relate to those beliefs quite differently. Two individuals may both believe that many of those around them are poor and deserve help, but this knowledge may lead only one of them to decide to actually help the poor. Kierkegaard primarily discusses subjectivity with regard to religious matters, however. As already noted, he argues that doubt is an element of faith and that it is impossible to gain any objective certainty about religious doctrines such as the existence of God or the life of Christ. The most one could hope for would be the conclusion that it is probable that the Christian doctrines are true, but if a person were to believe such doctrines only to the degree they seemed likely to be true, he or she would not be genuinely religious at all. Faith consists in a subjective relation of absolute commitment to these doctrines. Either/Or, one of Kierkegaard's works, was authored under the pseudonyms 'A' and 'B,' or Judge William, and edited under the pseudonym Victor Eremita. Half of Kierkegaard's authorship was written behind the mask of several pseudonymous characters he created to represent different ways of thinking. This was part of Kierkegaard's indirect communication. According to several passages in his works and journals, such as The Point of View of My Work as an Author, Kierkegaard wrote this way in order to prevent his works from being treated as a philosophical system with a systematic structure. In the Point of View, Kierkegaard wrote: 'In the pseudonymous works, there is not a single word which is mine. I have no opinion about these works except as a third person, no knowledge of their meaning, except as a reader, not the remotest private relation to them. ' Kierkegaard used indirect communication to make it difficult to ascertain whether he actually held any of the views presented in his works. He hoped readers would simply read the work at face value without attributing it to some aspect of his life. Kierkegaard also did not want his readers to treat his work as an authoritative system, but rather look to themselves for interpretation. Early Kierkegaardian scholars, such as Theodor W. Adorno, have disregarded Kierkegaard's intentions and argue the entire authorship should be treated as Kierkegaard's own personal and religious views. This view leads to many confusions and contradictions which make Kierkegaard appear incoherent. However, many later scholars such as the post-structuralists, have respected Kierkegaard's intentions and interpreted his work by attributing the pseudonymous texts to their respective authors. Kierkegaard's final years were taken up with a sustained, outright attack on the Danish People's Church by means of newspaper articles published in The Fatherland and a series of self-published pamphlets called The Moment Kierkegaard was initially called to action after Professor Hans Lassen Martensen gave a speech in church in which he called his recently deceased predecessor Bishop Jakob P. Mynster a 'truth-witness, one of the authentic truth-witnesses. ' Kierkegaard had an affection towards Mynster, but had come to see that his conception of Christianity was in man's interest, rather than God's, and in no way was Mynster's life comparable to that of a 'truth-witness. ' Before the tenth chapter of The Moment could be published, Kierkegaard collapsed on the street and was eventually taken to a hospital. He stayed in the hospital for over a month and refused to receive communion from a pastor, whom Kierkegaard regarded as merely an official and not a servant of God. He said to Emil Boesen, a friend since childhood who kept a record of his conversations with Kierkegaard and was himself a pastor, that his life had been one of great and unknown suffering, which looked like vanity to others but was not. Kierkegaard died in Frederik's Hospital after being there for over a month, possibly from complications from a fall he had taken from a tree when he was a boy. He was interred in the Assistens Kirkegaard in the Norrebro section of Copenhagen. At Kierkegaard's funeral, his nephew Henrik Lund caused a disturbance by protesting that Kierkegaard was being buried by the official church even though in his life he had broken from and denounced it. Lund was later fined.

 

 

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(08/28/2008) Clandestine by James Ellroy. New York. 1982. Avon Books. Paperback Original. keywords: Mystery Los Angeles. 342 pages. 0380811413. December 1982.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Fred Underhill is a young cop on the rise in Los Angeles in the early 1950's -- a town blinded to its own grime by Hollywood glitter; a society nourished by newspaper lies that wants its heroes all-American and squeaky clean. A chance to lead on a possible serial killing is all it takes to fuel Underhill's reckless ambition - and it propels him into a dangerous alliance with certain mad and unstable elements of the law enforcement hierarchy. When the case implodes with disastrous consequences, it is Fred Underhill who takes the fall. His life is in ruins, his promising future suddenly a dream of the past. And his good and pure love for a crusading woman lawyer has been corrupted and may not survive. But even without the authority of a badge, Fred Underhill knows that his only hope for redemption lies in following the investigation to its grim conclusion. And the Hell to which he has been consigned for his sins is the perfect place to hunt for a killer who hungers but has no soul.

 

 

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(08/27/2008) Brown's Requiem by James Ellroy. New York. 1981. Avon Books. keywords: Mystery Los Angeles Golf. 256 pages. Cover art by Crane. 0380787415.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Fritz Brown's L. A. --and his life--are masses of contradictions, like stirring chorales sung for the dead. A less-than-spotless former cop with a drinking problem--a private eye-cum-repo man with a taste for great music--he has been known to wallow in the grime beneath the Hollywood glitter. But Fritz Brown's life is about to change, thanks to the appearance of a racist psycho who flashes too much cash for a golf caddie and who walked away clean from a multiple murder rap. Reopening this cas could be Fritz's redemption; his welcome back to a moral world and his path to a pure and perfect love. But to get there, he must make it through a grim, lightless place where evil has no national borders; where lies beget lies and death begets death; where there's little tolerance for Bach or Beethoven and deadly arson is a lesser mortal sin; and where a P. I. 's unhealthy interest in the past can turn beautiful music into funeral dirge.

 

 

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(08/26/2008) Burning Patience by Antonio Skarmeta. New York. 1987. Pantheon Books. Translated From The Spanish By Katherine Silver. keywords: Literature Translated Chile Latin America. 119 pages. Jacket photograph by Christine Rodin. Jacket design by Louise Fili. 0394555767. April 1987. Originally published in the United States in Spanish as Ardiente Paciencia by Ediciones del Norte, Hanover, N. H. in 1985.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Witty, hilarious, delightfully readable, Antonio Skarmeta's new novel, BURNING PATIENCE, is a bittersweet tale of adolescent love set against the sadness of Chile's recent history. Its situation is simplicity itself. Teenager Mario Jimenez, wildly in love with Beatriz Gonzalez, the local bar-owner's daughter, is the postman of Isla Negra. In this small Chilean fishing village where almost everyone is illiterate, Mario's only customer is none other than Latin America's greatest poet, Pablo Neruda. What an opportunity, if not to become a poet, at least to enlist this most famous romantic and lover in a campaign to set the woman of his dreams on fire! As the beautiful Beatriz falls under the spell of adolescent fervor and Neruda's words, this very down-to-earth, erotic fairy tale of a young man and his famous guardian angel gains an immense charm, humor - and power, For it is also a tale about the power others have to destroy poets and mailmen alike, but not the words they have let loose in the world.

 

 

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(08/25/2008) The Mystic Masseur by V. S. Naipaul. New York. 1959. Vanguard. keywords: Literature Caribbean Trinidad India England. 215 pages.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Here is the astringent wit of an Aubrey Mennen turned loose in the rich landscape of a Caribbean isle. V. S. Naipaul is an extraordinary storyteller - a voice from Trinidad of today, as contemporary and exciting as Calypso - and in THE MYSTIC MASSEUR he has created one of the most amusing and fascinating characters in contemporary fiction, Ganesh Rasumair. If Ganesh had not been so unappreciated as a schoolteacher, he would never have become a masseur. If he had not lacked talent as an ordinary masseur, he would never have blossomed into a mystic one; and, of course, if he had not lived in Trinidad, at first an obscure member and finally an ornament of the Hindu community there, none of the things that happened to him would have happened in quite that way, for Trinidad, seen with the eye of humor, is a most surprising place. This is a story of success: a success that resulted, or so it seems, from inspired detachment. Achievement was not something at which Ganesh aimed but something that overtook him in oblique and unexpected ways, often appearing at first sight to be a setback but always advancing his career. Mr. Naipaul, who himself comes of an Indian family settled in Trinidad, writes with delicate precision and keeps a poker face. He occasionally permits himself a raised eyebrow and a look of wonder at the charming absurdity of human beings, but it is his reader, not he, who laughs aloud. 'A delightful book. bubbles and sparkles with life and gaiety. Wonderfully deft. Over every inch of Mr. Naipaul's pages flickers the gleam of his fun - a fun as light and acute and affectionate as is his view of human nature. ' - From the Introduction by LORD DAVID CECIL. The best job of its kind since Joyce Cary looked through the wambly brown eyes of Mister Johnson. ' - TIME Magazine.

Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul, KB, TC, better known as V. S. Naipaul, is a Trinidadian-born British writer of Indo-Trinidadian descent, currently resident in Wiltshire. Naipaul was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2001 and knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1990. He is the son, older brother, uncle, and cousin of published authors Seepersad Naipaul, Shiva Naipaul, Neil Bissoondath, and Vahni Capildeo, respectively. His current wife is Nadira Naipaul, a former journalist. In 1971, Naipaul became the first person of Indian origin to win a Booker Prize for his book In a Free State. In awarding Naipaul the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2001, the Swedish Academy praised his work 'for having united perceptive narrative and incorruptible scrutiny in works that compel us to see the presence of suppressed histories. ' The Committee added, 'Naipaul is a modern philosophe carrying on the tradition that started originally with Lettres persanes and Candide. In a vigilant style, which has been deservedly admired, he transforms rage into precision and allows events to speak with their own inherent irony. ' The Committee also noted Naipaul's affinity with the Polish author of Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad. His fiction and especially his travel writing have been criticised for their allegedly unsympathetic portrayal of the Third World. Edward Said, for example, has argued that he 'allowed himself quite consciously to be turned into a witness for the Western prosecution', promoting 'colonial mythologies about wogs and darkies'. This perspective is most salient in The Middle Passage, which Naipaul composed after returning to the Caribbean after ten years of self-exile in England, and An Area of Darkness, an arguably stark condemnation on his ancestral homeland of India. His works have become required reading in many schools within the Third World. Among English-speaking countries, Naipaul's following is notably stronger in the United Kingdom than it is in the United States. Though a regular visitor to India since the 1960s, he has arguably 'analysed' India from an arms-length distance, in some cases initially with considerable distaste, and later with 'grudging affection', and of late perhaps even with 'ungrudging affection' He has also made attempts over the decades to identify his ancestral village in India, believed to be near Gorakhpur in Eastern Uttar Pradesh from where his grandfather had migrated to Trinidad as indentured labourer. In several of his books Naipaul has observed Islam, and he has been criticised for dwelling on negative aspects, e. g. nihilism among fundamentalists. Naipaul's support for Hindutva has also been controversial. He has been quoted describing the destruction of the Babri Mosque as a 'creative passion', and the invasion of Babur in the 16th century as a 'mortal wound. ' He views Vijayanagar, which fell in 1565, as the last bastion of native Hindu civilisation. He remains a somewhat reviled figure in Pakistan, which he bitingly condemned in Among the Believers. In 1998 a controversial memoir by Naipaul's sometime protege Paul Theroux was published. The book provides a personal, though occasionally caustic portrait of Naipaul. The memoir, entitled Sir Vidia's Shadow, was precipitated by a falling-out between the two men a few years earlier. In early 2007, V. S Naipaul made a long-awaited return to his homeland of Trinidad. He urged citizens to shrug off the notions of 'Indian' and 'African' and to concentrate on being 'Trinidadian'. He was warmly received by students and intellectuals alike and it seems, finally, that he has come to some form of closure with Trinidad. Naipaul is married to Nadira Naipaul. She was born Nadira Khannum Alvi in Kenya and got married in Pakistan. She worked as a journalist for Pakistani newspaper, The Nation for ten years before meeting Naipaul. They married in 1996, two months after the death of Naipaul's first wife, Patricia Hale. Nadira had been divorced twice before her marriage to Naipaul. She has two children from a previous marriage, Maliha and Nadir. Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul, KB, TC, better known as V. S. Naipaul, is a Trinidadian-born British writer of Indo-Trinidadian descent, currently resident in Wiltshire. Naipaul was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2001 and knighted by Queen Elizabeth II in 1990. He is the son, older brother, uncle, and cousin of published authors Seepersad Naipaul, Shiva Naipaul, Neil Bissoondath, and Vahni Capildeo, respectively. His current wife is Nadira Naipaul, a former journalist. In 1971, Naipaul became the first person of Indian origin to win a Booker Prize for his book In a Free State. In awarding Naipaul the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2001, the Swedish Academy praised his work 'for having united perceptive narrative and incorruptible scrutiny in works that compel us to see the presence of suppressed histories. ' The Committee added, 'Naipaul is a modern philosophe carrying on the tradition that started originally with Lettres persanes and Candide. In a vigilant style, which has been deservedly admired, he transforms rage into precision and allows events to speak with their own inherent irony. ' The Committee also noted Naipaul's affinity with the Polish author of Heart of Darkness, Joseph Conrad. His fiction and especially his travel writing have been criticised for their allegedly unsympathetic portrayal of the Third World. Edward Said, for example, has argued that he 'allowed himself quite consciously to be turned into a witness for the Western prosecution', promoting 'colonial mythologies about wogs and darkies'. This perspective is most salient in The Middle Passage, which Naipaul composed after returning to the Caribbean after ten years of self-exile in England, and An Area of Darkness, an arguably stark condemnation on his ancestral homeland of India. His works have become required reading in many schools within the Third World. Among English-speaking countries, Naipaul's following is notably stronger in the United Kingdom than it is in the United States. Though a regular visitor to India since the 1960s, he has arguably 'analysed' India from an arms-length distance, in some cases initially with considerable distaste, and later with 'grudging affection', and of late perhaps even with 'ungrudging affection' He has also made attempts over the decades to identify his ancestral village in India, believed to be near Gorakhpur in Eastern Uttar Pradesh from where his grandfather had migrated to Trinidad as indentured labourer. In several of his books Naipaul has observed Islam, and he has been criticised for dwelling on negative aspects, e. g. nihilism among fundamentalists. Naipaul's support for Hindutva has also been controversial. He has been quoted describing the destruction of the Babri Mosque as a 'creative passion', and the invasion of Babur in the 16th century as a 'mortal wound. ' He views Vijayanagar, which fell in 1565, as the last bastion of native Hindu civilisation. He remains a somewhat reviled figure in Pakistan, which he bitingly condemned in Among the Believers. In 1998 a controversial memoir by Naipaul's sometime prot?g? Paul Theroux was published. The book provides a personal, though occasionally caustic portrait of Naipaul. The memoir, entitled Sir Vidia's Shadow, was precipitated by a falling-out between the two men a few years earlier. In early 2007, V. S Naipaul made a long-awaited return to his homeland of Trinidad. He urged citizens to shrug off the notions of 'Indian' and 'African' and to concentrate on being 'Trinidadian'. He was warmly received by students and intellectuals alike and it seems, finally, that he has come to some form of closure with Trinidad. Naipaul is married to Nadira Naipaul. She was born Nadira Khannum Alvi in Kenya and got married in Pakistan. She worked as a journalist for Pakistani newspaper, The Nation for ten years before meeting Naipaul. They married in 1996, two months after the death of Naipaul's first wife, Patricia Hale. Nadira had been divorced twice before her marriage to Naipaul. She has two children from a previous marriage, Maliha and Nadir.

 

 

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(08/24/2008) The Last Of The Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper. New York. 1986. Penguin Books. Introduction By Richard Slotkin. keywords: Penguin Classic Paperback Literature America 18th Century. 352 pages. Cover painting 'The Last of the Mohicans ' by Asher Durand/Art Resource. 0140390243.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   James Fenimore Cooper's unforgettable portrait of fierce individualism and moral courage, set against the bloody French and Indian War Angered by the values of his materialistic society, Hawkeye lives apart from other white men, sharing the solitude and sublimity of the wilderness with his Mohican Indian friend, Chingachgook. But the savageries of the French and Indian War force them out of exile, and they agree to guide two sisters in search of their father through hostile Indian country. Tragic, fast-paced, and stocked with the elements of a classic frontier adventure - massacres and raids, innocent settlers, hardened soldiers, renegade Indians, and a doomed love affair - the novel's enduring value also lies in its contributions to the American frontier mythos, and its insights into the friendship between two men at odds with their own people.

 

 

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(08/23/2008) The Deerslayer by James Fenimore Cooper. New York. 1987. Penguin Books. Introduction By Donald Pease. keywords: Penguin Classic Paperback Literature America 18th Century. 548 pages. Cover painting The Spirit of the Indian by Thomas Moran, 1869 Courtesy of the Philbrook Art Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma. 0140390618.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   James Fenimore Cooper's spirited romance has been praised for its authenticity as a portrait of life during America's western movement. At Lake Otsego, during the French and Indian Wars, great frontiersman Natty Bumppo forsakes his love to come to the aid of Thomas Hutter, a trapper under the attack of Iroquois Indians. Published in 1841, THE DEERSLAYER is the first of the 'Leatherstocking' tales, which reveal the courageous and perseverant nature of the pioneer. Recognized for his descriptive power, Cooper created in Natty Bumppo a mythical character--one of the most significant in the history of American literature. The text of this book was approved by the Center for Scholarly Editions of the Modern Language Association and published in hardcover by the State University of New York Press.

 

 

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(08/22/2008) The Saga Of King Hrolf Kraki by Jesse L. Byock. New York. 1998. Penguin Books. Translated From The Icelandic & With An Introduction By Jesse L by ock. keywords: Literature Iceland Scandinavia Translated Mythology Saga. 263 pages. The cover shows a detail from a bronze plaque showing a hero struggling with two bears found at Torslunda, Oland in the Statens Historiska Museet, Stockholm. 9780140435931.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   'He was a beast by day, even if he again became a man at night.' Composed in medieval Iceland, Hrolf's saga is one of the greatest of all mythic-legendary sagas, relating half-fantastical events that were said to have occurred in fifth-century Denmark. It tells of the exploits of King Hrolf and of his famous champions, including Bodvar Bjarki, the 'bear-warrior': a powerful figure whose might and bear-like nature are inspired by the same legendary heritage as Beowulf. Depicting a world of wizards, sorceresses and 'berserker' fighters - originally members of a cult of Odin - this is a compelling tale of ancient magic. A work of timeless power and beauty, it offers both a treasury of Icelandic prose and a masterful gathering of epic, cultic memory, traditional folk tale and myth from the Viking age and far earlier. This translation by Jesse L by ock captures the elegant simplicity of the original. His introduction considers the history of the myths and the influence of Christianity upon the saga. This edition also includes a map, genealogical tables and a glossary of proper names.

 

 

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(08/21/2008) Eyrbyggja Saga by Hermann Palsson & Paul Edwards. New York. 1989. Penguin Books. Translated From The Icelandic & With An Introduction and Notes By Hermann Palsson & Paul Edwards. keywords: Literature Iceland Scandinavia Translated Mythology Saga. 179 pages. The cover shows a detail from a 16th century Icelandic altar frontal in the National Museum of Iceland. 9780140445305.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   EYRBYGGJA SAGA is prominent in the great group of medieval Icelandic sagas that Magnus Magnusson has called 'historical novels -- the first novels to be written in Europe'. Mixing realism with wild Gothic imagination, history with eerie tales of hauntings, it dramatizes a thirteenth-century view of the past, from the pagan anarchy of the Viking Age to the settlement of Iceland, the coming of Christianity and the beginnings of organized society. Its central figure is Snorri, a man so perplexingly ambiguous that the narrator himself is drawn to speculate on his motives and a character who brilliantly epitomizes the violent stresses of his times. 'Of all the various records of Icelandic history and literature, there is none more interesting than Eyrbyggja Saga' - Sir Walter Scott.

 

 

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(08/20/2008) Gisli Sursson's Saga & The Saga Of The People Of Eyri by Martin S. Regal & Judy Quinn. New York. 2003. Penguin Books. Translated From The Icelandic By Martin A. Regal & Judy Quinn. Edited & With An Introduction By Vesteinn Olason. keywords: Literature Iceland Scandinavia Translated Saga Mythology. 247 pages. Cover - Illuminated capital showing a killing, from the beginning of the chapter on personal rights in the Svalbaroosbok manuscript of Jonsbok. 0140447725.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Based on oral tales that originated in historical events in tenth-century Iceland, these two sagas follow the fate of a powerful Viking family across two generations, from its early Norwegian ancestry through fierce battles to defend its honour. GISLI SURSSON'S SAGA is a story of forbidden love and divided loyalties, in which the heroic Gisli vows to avenge the murder of his 'sworn brother' and sets in motion a chain of bloody events that culminate in tragedy. THE SAGA OF THE PEOPLE OF EYRI continues the story with Snorri, a cunning leader of the next generation, who uses his intellect to restore social order. Blending gripping narrative, humour, the supernatural and shrewd observation, these tales reveal the richness of the saga tradition and present a vivid record of a society moving from ruthless individualism to a Christian ethic of reconciliation and order. These clear, contemporary translations are accompanied by an introduction giving the historical and literary background to the sagas. This edition also includes appendices on social and political structures and early Icelandic literature, notes, maps, a glossary and an index of characters.

 

 

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(08/19/2008) The Saga Of Grettir The Strong by Bernard Scudder. New York. 2005. Penguin Books. Translated From The Icelandic By Bernard Scudder. Edited & Introduced By Ornolfur Thirsson. keywords: Literature Iceland Scandinavia Translated Sagas Mythology. 267 pages. Cover illustration of Grettir the Strong from a seventeenth century manuscript in the Arni Magnusson Institute, Iceland. 0140447733.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Composed at the end of the fourteenth century by an unknown author, THE SAGA OF GRETTIR THE STRONG is one of the last great Icelandic sagas. It relates the tale of Grettir, an eleventh-century warrior struggling to hold on to the values of a heroic age as they are eclipsed by Christianity and a more pastoral lifestyle. Unable to settle into a community of farmers, Grettir becomes the aggressive scourge of both honest men and evil monsters - until, following a battle with the sinister ghost Glam, he is cursed to endure a life of tortured loneliness away from civilization, fighting giants, trolls and berserks. A mesmerizing combination of pagan ideals and Christian faith, this is a profoundly moving conclusion to the Golden Age of saga writing. New to Penguin Classics, this is an updated edition of Bernard Scudder's acclaimed translation. The new introduction by Ornolfur Thorsson considers the influence of Christianity on Icelandic saga writing, and this edition also includes genealogical tables, maps and a note on the translation.

 

 

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(08/18/2008) The Emigrant by L. F. Dostoieffskaya. London. 1916. Constable & Company. Translated From The Russian By Vera Margolies. Introduction By Stephen Graham. keywords: Literature Russia Women Translated. 320 pages.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   'The Emigrant', by L. F. Dostoieffskaya, a daughter of Dostoieffsky the novelist, was published in 1913, and obtained considerable success in Russia. It is a study of the life of a Russian girl in Italy. It is a deeply interesting study of contemporary types. In truth, only two Russians take part in the story, the hero and heroine, Prince Gzhatsky and Irene. But the long struggle which is portrayed is a Russian struggle. - from the introduction by Stephen Graham to the 1916 Constable & Company edition translated by Vera Margolies.

 

 

 

 

 

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(08/17/2008) Sisters Of The Yam: Black Women & Self-Recovery by bell hooks. Boston. 1993. South End Press. keywords: Politics Psychology Black Women. 195 pages. Cover photo by Laura Simpson, 'Waterbearer', 1986. 0896084566.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   When SISTERS OF THE YAM: BLACK WOMEN AND SELF-RECOVERY was originally released in 1994, it won critical praise and solidified bell hooks' reputation as one of the leading public intellectuals of her generation. Today, the book is considered a classic in African American and feminist circles. In SISTERS OF THE YAM, hooks examines how the emotional health of black women is wounded by daily assaults of racism and sexism. Exploring such central life issues as work, beauty, trauma, addiction, eroticism and estrangement from nature, hooks shares numerous strategies for self-recovery and healing. She also shows how black women can empower themselves and effectively struggle against racism, sexism and consumer capitalism.

 

 

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(08/16/2008) The Cardinals With Meditations & Short Stories by Bessie Head. Portsmouth. 1995. Heinemann. keywords: Literature Africa South Africa Women. 141 pages. Cover illustration by Alan Bond. 0435909673.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   This is the first time THE CARDINALS is available outside South Africa. It is the 1960s in South Africa. Blacks and whites are segregated, in life and love. This is Mouse's world, but she is blind to it, living only for her books. A job as a reporter on African Beat forces her to open her eyes. Newsroom sexism combines with everyday stories of racial repression, and political muck-raking to radically alter Mouse's perceptions. But it is her relationship with the cynical newshound Johnny that is the greatest challenge to her loveless solitude. THE CARDINALS was one of Bessie Head's earliest works. Like the other short pieces in this collection it is a passionate exploration of the effects of apartheid. Bessie Head was born in South Africa in 1937 and died in exile in 1986. Her works include - WHEN RAIN CLOUDS GATHER, MARU, and A QUESTION OF POWER.

 

 

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(08/15/2008) Discipline & Punish: The Birth Of The Prison by Michel Foucault. New York. 1978. Pantheon Books. Translated from The French By Alan Sheridan. keywords: Psychology Punishment Prisons Philosophy. 334 pages. Jacket design by Tan Collins, Inc. 0394499425. January 1978.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   The author of the classic study of madness has now written the definitive account of how prisons and the power to punish became a part of our lives. Sweeping aside almost three centuries of increasingly sterile penal debate, Michel Foucault explains why the present-day arguments about the failures of penal institutions are, in fact, as old as the modern prison itself. In a remarkable tour de force, he demonstrates that these alleged failures are actually an inherent part of an institution which never functioned to eliminate criminals but only to define, refine, and perpetuate crime. To find out why this is so, Foucault goes back to the emergence of Western penal methods in the seventeenth century, when torture of the body gave way to punishment of the soul through rehabilitation. The world of medieval torture, with its intricate, gruesome methods for carving punishment directly on the body and its public spectacles of brutality, is first vividly re-created. Then the methods of corrective incarceration are shown to have shattered these traditional ways, bringing about a virtual revolution in the treatment and understanding of crime and punishment. Foucault skillfully reveals how this philosophy of rehabilitation, lauded as more humane and progressive by a virtual army of technician/reformers--wardens, doctors, chaplains, educators, psychiatrists--in fact created and insidiously expanded the most sophisticated methods of repression and behavior transformation. Prisons, he argues, cannot be separated from the societies they serve; they are but the concentrated expression of a discipline that has spread throughout schools, armies, factories, and hospitals since the seventeenth century. With their regularized routines, rigidly organized labor, experts on normality, and specialized authorities who test, classify, and assess, prisons epitomize the ways people are controlled and repressed today.

The holder of a Chair at France's most prestigious institution, the College de France, Foucault has also taught at the University of Buffalo. He is the author of MADNESS AND CIVILIZATION, THE ORDER OF THINGS, THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF KNOWLEDGE, THE BIRTH OF THE CLINIC, and I, PIERRE RIVIERE.

 

 

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(08/14/2008) The Last Man by Mary Shelley. Oxford/New York. 1994. Oxford University Press. Edited & With An Introduction By Morton D. Paley. keywords: Literature England Women. 479 pages. Cover illustration is a detail from 'The Old Man and Death', 1773, by Joseph Wright. 0192831526.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   'The last man! Yes. I may well describe that solitary beings feelings, feeling myself as the last relic of a beloved race, my companions extinct before me' - Mary Shelley, Journal, May 1824. Best remembered as the author of FRANKENSTEIN, Mary Shelley wrote THE LAST MAN eight years later, on returning to England from Italy after her husband Percy's death. It is the twenty-first century, and England is a republic governed by a ruling elite, one of whom, Adrian, Earl of Windsor, has introduced a Cumbrian boy to the circle. This outsider, Lionel Verney, narrates the story, a tale of complicated, tragic love, and of the gradual extermination of the human race by plague. THE LAST MAN also functions as an intriguing roman-a-clef, for the saintly Adrian is a monument to Percy Bysshe Shelley, and his friend Lord Raymond is a portrait of Byron. The novel offers a vision of the future that expresses a reaction against Romanticism, as Shelley demonstrates the failure of the imagination and of art to redeem her doomed characters.

 

 

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(08/13/2008) The Elder Edda: A Selection by Paul B. Taylor & W. H. Auden. New York. 1970. Random House. Introduction By Peter H. Salus & Paul B. Taylor. keywords: Literature Poetry Iceland Mythology Translated Scandinavia. 175 pages. Jacket Design By Anita Karl. April 1970.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   The POETIC or ELDER EDDA is a compilation made about A. D. 1200 of earlier Icelandic poems on cosmology, mythology, and the stories of Norse heroes. Together with the PROSE or YOUNGER EDDA, it is the chief source of our knowledge of Scandinavian mythology. This new translation--the result of a collaboration between a distinguished scholar and a major poet who has always felt a deep instinctive sympathy for the great masterpieces of Northern Europe-succeeds superbly in conveying the power, sharpness, and precision of the original. It is prefaced with a most helpful introduction by Professor Peter H. Salus and Paul B. Taylor.

WYSTAN HUGH AUDEN was born in York, England, in 1907. He has been a resident of the United States since 1939, and an American citizen since 1946. Educated at Gresham's School, Holt, and at Christ Church, Oxford, he became associated with a small group of young writers in London--among them Stephen Spender and Christopher Isherwood. He is the author of several volumes of poetry and essays. Mr. Auden has been the recipient of a number of awards, among them the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the Bollingen Prize in Poetry, the Guinness Poetry Award and, in 1967, the National Medal for Literature given by the National Book Committee.

PAUL B. TAYLOR is Professor of Old and Middle English at the University of Geneva, Switzerland. Prior to this he was in Iceland as a Fulbright lecturer at the University of Iceland.

PETEB H. SALUS is Chairman of the Division of Humanities at Scarborough College, University of Toronto. He has also been Chairman of the Linguistics Department at Queens College, City University of New York, and was Chairman of the Program in Linguistics at the University of Michigan.

 

 

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(08/12/2008) The Count Of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. New York. 2003. Penguin Books. Translated From The French & With An Introduction By Robin Buss. keywords: Literature Translated France. 1276 pages. The cover shows a detail of 'Smugglers Landing in a Storm' by Philippe Jacques de Loutherbourg. 0140449264.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Thrown in prison for a crime he has not committed, Edmond Dantes is confined to the grim fortress of If. There he learns of a great hoard of treasure hidden on the Isle of Monte Cristo and he becomes determined not only to escape, but also to unearth the treasure and use it to plot the destruction of the three men responsible for his incarceration. Dumas' epic tale of suffering and retribution, inspired by a real-life case of wrongful imprisonment, was a huge popular success when it was first serialized in the 1840s. Robin Buss' lively translation is complete and unabridged, and remains faithful to the style of Dumas' original. This edition includes an introduction, explanatory notes and suggestions for further reading.

 

 

 

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(08/11/2008) Because The Night by James Ellroy. New York. 1984. Mysterious Press. keywords: Mystery Los Angeles. 280 pages. Jacket painting by Gamache. 089296071x.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   The saga of Detective Sergeant Lloyd Hopkins, begun in BLOOD ON THE MOON, continues in a powerful new novel. Files regarding the disappearance of Jacob Herzog, a hero cop whose legend is almost as grand as Lloyd's own, and a multiple murder committed with a pre-Civil War revolver, are on Hopkins' desk. With his usual tenacity, he pieces the puzzle together; the picture which emerges is a frightening one. The two cases are related, and the motivating force behind them is cloaked in layers of darkness. Within that darkness lurks John Havilland. Known as The Night Tripper, Havilland is a psychiatrist whose pleasure comes from the manipulation of the weak and lonely. Power for Dr. John comes from knowing as much as he can about as many as he can, and then using that information for whatever end suits his purposes. even if that end is murder! As Hopkins closes in, the doctor uses his patients as a buffer until the detective breaks through the circle, causing Havilland's madness to rage uncontrolled. The conclusion of BECAUSE THE NIGHT brings a shattering confrontation and the exorcism of Lloyd's own demons.

 

 

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(08/10/2008) Memories & Portraits by Ivan Bunin. Garden City. 1951. Doubleday. Translated from the Russian by Vera Traill & Robin Chancellor. keywords: Literature Translated Autobiography Russia. 217 pages. Jacket design by Ronald Clyne.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   MEMORIES AND PORTRAITS is the informal memoirs of Russian literary master Ivan Bunin - winner of the Nobel Prize in 1933 - which presents many fascinating and intimate portraits of three generations of Europe's famous artistic and literary men. Here, for example, is a masterly evocation of Chekhov, a man of many moods, sometimes simple, at other times bafflingly complex. Bunin has preserved some of Chekhov's most revealing comments on writing: 'You should only sit down to write when you are cold as ice. ' 'The sea is difficult to describe. Do you know the description I read the other day in a schoolboy's exercise book? `The sea was big. ' That was all it said. I found it wonderful.' Here also are many other renowned figures brought vividly to you by the man whom Andre Gide hailed recently, on the occasion of his eightieth birthday, as one of the greatest writers of his generation. There are Tolstoy telling Chekhov that he thought Shakespeare wrote badly; a joyful picture of Chaliapin, brilliant man and brilliant actor as well as great singer; and a delicately sculpted cameo of Rachmaninov. Bunin is a writer of the classical school. His prose is charged with overtones which brilliantly evoke a bygone world, peopled with irresistible characters. MEMORIES AND PORTRAITS is a delightful book which is objective yet reveals a charming and unique personality.

Ivan Bunin first came to prominence in 1908 when he was awarded the Pushkin Prize, then Russia's highest literary award, for his translations of Byron's poetic dramas and Longfellow's 'Song of Hiawatha. ' In 1910 and 1912 he published two novels, THE VILLAGE and THE ELAGHIN AFFAIR, which spread his reputation throughout Europe. Best known to Americans are his novel, THE WELL OF DAYS and the short story THE GENTLEMAN FROM SAN FRANCISCO. In 1933 Bunin was awarded the Nobel Prize. After opposing the Revolution in 1918, Bunin fled to France and has lived there since, in exile. Andre Gide wrote a tribute to him, lauding him as one of the foremost writers of the past fifty years.

 

 

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(08/09/2008) Deep Rivers by Jose Maria Arguedas. Austin. 1978. University Of Texas Press. Translated From The Spanish By Frances Horning Barraclough. Introduction by John V. Murra. Afterword by Mario Vargas Llosa. keywords: Literature Translated Peru Latin America. 248 pages. 0292715161.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   This powerful, poetic novel, set in the Peruvian Andes, has long resisted translation; its publication in English is truly a literary event. Jose Maria Arguedas draws upon his own Peruvian boyhood in portraying 'the sad and powerful current that buflets children who must face, all alone, a world fraught with monsters and fire, and great rivers. Ernesto, the narrator of DEEP RIVERS, is a child with origins in two worlds. The son of a wandering country lawyer, he is brought up by Indian servants until he enters a Catholic boarding school at age 14. In this urban Spanish environment he is a misfit and a loner. The conflict of the Indian and the Spanish cultures is acted out within him as it was in the life of Arguedas. For the author, the final resolution was his suicide in 1969. For the boy Ernesto, salvation is his world of dreams and memories. The games, music, insects, and flowers of his Andean childhood are more vividly alive for Emesto than the disturbing world of the present. This nostalgia helps to explain the novel's lyrical purity and its poetic, reminiscent tone. A major theme in Deep Rivers is the boy's strong link with the natural world, which is humanized to an extent that surpasses simple metaphor and becomes almost magical. Two of the novel's main episodes-the insurrection of the marketwomen and the suffering of the Indians during a typhus plague-involve conflict between the Indians and their Spanish masters. Ernesto observes these events, bewildered by the violence with which the two cultures clash. As Mario Vargas Llosa points out in the afterword, DEEP RIVERS records historical events and social problems at a personal level, 'the only way literary testimony can be living and not crystallize into dead symbols. ' Texas Pan American Series. CONTENTS: TRANSLATOR'S NOTE; INTRODUCTION by John V. Mutra; THE OLD MAN; Deep rivers; THE LEAVE-TAKING; THE HACIENDA; BRIDGE OVER THE WORLD; THE JOURNEYS; ZUMBAYLLU; THE INSURRECTION; DEEP CANYON; STONE AND LIME; YAWAR MAYU; THE COLONOS; AFTERWORD; DREAMS AND MAGIC IN JOS? MARIA ARGUEDAS by Mario Vargas Llosa; GLOSSARY.

Jose Maria Arguedas was an ethnologist, a poet, a folk musicologist, and the major Indianist novelist of our time. He was born in 1911 in Andahuaylas in rural Peru and, like Emesto, was raised by Indian servants whom he deeply loved. He earned his doctorate in anthropology at the University of San Marcos in Lima, where he was head of the Anthropology Department at the time of his death. While Arguedas' poetry was published in Quechua, he invented a language for his novels in which he used native syntax with Spanish vocabulary. This makes translation into other languages extremely difficult. Frances Horning Barraclough teaches Spanish at Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York, and has spent almost twenty years living and working in Chile and other parts of Latin America.

 

 

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(08/08/2008) The Long Goodbye by Raymond Chandler. London. 1953. Hamish Hamilton. keywords: Mystery America Los Angeles.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Raymond Chandler's ingenious novel finds Philip Marlowe constantly on the move with a case involving a war scarred drunk and his nymphomaniac wife. A psychotic gangster's on his trail; he's in trouble with the cops, and an unequaled number of corpses turns up.

 

 

 

 

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(08/07/2008) The Little Sister by Raymond Chandler. Boston. 1949. Houghton Mifflin. keywords: Mystery America Los Angeles. 249 pages.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   A movie starlet with a gangster boyfriend and a pair of siblings with a shared secret lure Marlowe into the less than glamorous and more than a little dangerous world of Hollywood fame. Chandler's first foray into the industry that dominates the company town that is Los Angeles.

 

 

 

 

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(08/06/2008) The Lady In The Lake by Raymond Chandler. New York. 1943. Knopf. keywords: Mystery America Los Angeles. 218 pages.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   A couple of missing wives--one a rich man's and one a poor man's--become the objects of Marlowe's investigation. One of them may have gotten a Mexican divorce and married a gigolo and the other may be dead. Marlowe's not sure he cares about either one, but he's not paid to care.

 

 

 

 

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(08/05/2008) The High Window by Raymond Chandler. New York. 1942. Knopf. keywords: Mystery America Los Angeles. 242 pages.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   A wealthy Pasadena widow with a mean streak, a missing daughter-in-law with a past, and a gold coin worth a small fortune--the elements don't quite add up until Marlowe discovers evidence of murder, rape, blackmail, and the worst kind of human exploitation.

 

 

 

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