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James Joyce's Ulysses by Stuart Gilbert. New York. 1934. Knopf. 379 pages + index pages.

 

 

james joyces ulysses 1934 no dwFROM THE PUBLISHER -

   With the passing of each year, Ulysses receives wider recognition and greater acclaim as a modern literary classic. To comprehend Joyce's masterpiece fully, to gain insight into its significance and structure, the serious reader will find this analytical and systematic guide invaluable. In this exegesis, written under Joyce's supervision, Stuart Gilbert presents a work that is at once scholarly, authoritative and stimulating.

 

 

 

Gilbert StuartStuart Gilbert (25 October 1883 – 5 January 1969) was an English literary scholar and translator. Among his translations into English are works by Alexis de Tocqueville, Édouard Dujardin, André Malraux, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, Georges Simenon, Jean Cocteau, Albert Camus, and Jean-Paul Sartre. He also assisted in the translation of James Joyce's Ulysses into French. He was born at Kelvedon Hatch, Essex, on 25 October 1883, the only son of a retired army officer, Arthur Stronge Gilbert, and Melvina (daughter of the Raja of Kapurthala). He attended Cheltenham and Hertford College, Oxford, taking a first in Classical Moderations. He joined the Indian Civil Service in 1907 and, after military service in the First World War, served as a judge in Burma until 1925. He then retired, settling in France with his French-born wife Moune (née Marie Douin). He remained there for the rest of his life, except for some time spent in Wales during the Second World War. Gilbert was one of the first Joycean scholars. He first read Ulysses while he was in Burma and admired it greatly. According to his wife, she and Gilbert were taking a walk in the Latin Quarter of Paris when they passed Shakespeare and Company, and saw some typescript pages of a French translation of Ulysses by Auguste Morel and Valery Larbaud displayed in the window. Gilbert noted several serious errors in the French rendering and introduced himself to Sylvia Beach, who was impressed by his criticisms of the translation. She took his name and telephone number, and suggested that Joyce, who was assisting in the translation, would contact him. This began many years of friendship between Joyce and Gilbert. He published James Joyce's Ulysses: A Study in 1930 (revised edition 1950) and published a collection of Joyce's letters in 1957. One of Gilbert's major projects was the translation from French of Roger Martin du Gard's novel sequence Les Thibault. Running to nearly 1,900 pages in translation, it was published by the Viking Press in the United States in two volumes, The Thibaults (1939) and Summer 1914 (1941).

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ulysses & Us: The Art Of Everyday Life In Joyce's Masterpiece by Declan Kiberd. New York. 2009. Norton. 401 pages. Jacket Design By Patti Ratchford. Jacket Photograph Courtesy Of The National Library Of Ireland Cover Of First Edition Ulysses Courtesy Of Fairfield Auction, LLC. 9780393070996.

 

 

9780393070996FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Declan Kiberd, professor of Anglo-Irish literature at the University College Dublin and Ireland’s premier literary historian, offers an audacious, pioneering new take on James Joyce’s masterpiece. ULYSSES, he argues, is not an esoteric work for the scholarly few but indisputably a work rooted in the lives of ordinary citizens, offering a humane vision of a more tolerant and decent life in the modern world. Structuring his analysis around the mundane pleasures highlighted throughout the work—including waking, walking, and drinking—Kiberd progresses through each of ULYSSES’s episodes to elegantly reveal that Joyce’s ultimate goal was to create a book honoring the richness of daily life. At a time when most other modernist authors adopted a rather dismissive tone toward popular culture and the emerging noise of industry, Joyce wrote ULYSSES to extol the everyday man and embrace the bustle of middle-class streets. He wanted to infuse that commonplace Dublin world, in all of its grit and vulgar physicality, with a fierce passion and a miraculous interiority that would illuminate its underlying beauty. For Kiberd, the seemingly banal hero of ULYSSES, Leopold Bloom, embodies an intensely ordinary kind of wisdom and, in this way, offers us a model for living well, in the tradition of Homer, Dante, and the Bible—all of which Joyce drew on in writing his book by shedding light on Joyce’s celebration of everyday life, Kiberd rescues ULYSSES from the dusty shelves of rarified literary neglect and presents it to the audience it was originally written about and for which it was intended.Kiberd Declan

 

 

DECLAN KIBERD is a professor of Anglo-Irish literature at the University College Dublin and the author of Inventing Ireland: The Literature of the Modern Nation, which won the Irish Times Prize. He lives in Dublin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tales Of Pirx The Pilot by Stanislaw Lem. New York. 1979. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. Translated From the Polish By Louis Iribarne. 206 pages. Jacket design by Jean-Marie Troillard. 0151879788.

 

 

Pirx, simpleton or genius? Pirx the Pilot is the Good Soldier Schweik sent into space.

 

 

0151879788FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   In Pilot Pirx, Stanislaw Lem has created an irresistibly likable character - an astronaut who gives the impression of still navigating by the seat of his pants. He is a bumbler, but an inspired one. We are at a moment in time when the Transgalactic tine flies regularly to the Moon, which by now provides excellent tourist accommodations; space travel has become routine, Yet things go wrong, mysteriously and suspiciously, and Pirx is the one to investigate strange accidents, either because his superiors consider him expendable, or because they trust his flair. Whimsical, spellbinding, infused with Lem's uncannily vivid 'familiarity' with the day-to-day realities and regions of space travel, the tales of Pilot Pirx build up to a towering climax. We meet Pirx in school, embarking on a training mission that is to drive home to him, with devastating impact, the inadequacy of textbook knowledge in an astronaut's arsenal. In 'Terminus,' the last and longest adventure, Pirx deciphers a spaceship's sinister past with the help of a robot's retentive memory; the writing develops a new dimension, revealing Lem's imaginative affinity with robots, whom he endows with something akin to feelings by investing his central character, Pirx, with the full range of human foibles, Lem offers here a wonderful vision of the audacity, childlike curiosity, and intuition that may give man the courage to confront the vastness of outer space.

 

 

Lem StanislawStanislaw Lem (12 September 1921 – 27 March 2006) was a Polish writer of science fiction, philosophy and satire. His books have been translated into 41 languages and have sold over 27 million copies. He is known as the author of the 1961 novel Solaris, which has been made into a feature film three times. In 1976 Theodore Sturgeon wrote that Lem was the most widely read science-fiction writer in the world. In 1996, he received the prestigious Polish award, the Order of the White Eagle. His works explore philosophical themes; speculation on technology, the nature of intelligence, the impossibility of mutual communication and understanding, despair about human limitations and humanity's place in the universe. They are sometimes presented as fiction, but others are in the form of essays or philosophical books. Translations of his works are difficult due to passages with elaborate word formation, alien or robotic poetry, and puns.

 

 

 

 

 

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 The Hard Facts Of The Grimms' Fairy Tales by Maria Tatar. Princeton. 1987. Princeton University Press. 278 pages. Cover illustration - Snow White. From 'Sneewittchen. Ein Kinder-Marchen mit 17 Bildern, illustrated by Theodore Hosemann (Berlin - Winckelmann, 1847). 0691067228.

 

 

From one of the most interesting writers on folklore around, a look at the classic Grimm Brothers fairy tales in their uncensored form tracing their transformation from adult reading material to the watered-down tales that many of us first heard as children.

 

 

hard facts of the grimms fairy talesFROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

   A look at the classic Grimm Brothers fairy tales in their uncensored form tracing their transformation from adult reading material to the watered-down tales that many of us first heard as children. Even those who remember that Snow White's stepmother arranges the murder of her stepdaughter, that doves peck out the eyes of Cinderella's stepsisters, that Briar Rose's suitors bleed to death on the hedge surrounding her castle, or that a mad rage drives Rumpelstiltskin to tear himself in two will be surprised by Maria Tatar's revelations about the tales of the brothers Grimm in their unexpurgated form. Murder, mutilation, cannibalism, infanticide, and incest: the darker side of classic fairy tales figures as the subject matter for this intriguing study of Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm's Nursery and Household Tales. Although children never have much trouble accepting the hard facts of the bedtime stories in this collection, adults have often found it difficult to come to terms with their sensationalistic content. Bruno Bettelheim has taught us to look for deeper symbolic meanings in the violence of fairy tales. Now Professor Tatar skillfully employs the tools not only of the psychoanalyst but also of the folklorist, literary critic, and historian to examine the harsher aspects of the stories gathered by the Grimms. Few books have been written in English on the tales collected by the Grimms, and none has probed their allegedly happy endings so thoroughly. From a first chapter on 'Sex and Violence' to an epilogue entitled 'Getting Even,' the author presents an entirely new interpretation of this best-selling of all German books. She focuses above all on the wishes for revenge that drive the heroes and heroines of the Grimms' tales. In transforming folk materials that once served as adult entertainment into children's reading matter, the Grimms may have suppressed episodes touching on sexual matters, but they often embellished descriptions of cruelty, especially when it took the form of revenge. For Professor Tatar violent family conflicts, the pitting of the weak against the strong, and universal fantasies of retaliation are keys to the enduring popularity of the Grimms' stories. 'Tatar seeks to reexamine the Grimms' tales by combining methods from psychology, structuralism, folklore, and social history. She has a fine ability to bring together research in the field and to conceive new interpretations. The book is eminently readable and will certainly Tatar Mariahelp the general reader to reassess the Grimms' tales. ' - JACK ZIPES, University of Florida.

 

 

  MARIA TATAR is Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures at Harvard University. She is the author of SPELLBOUND: STUDIES ON MESMERISM AND LITERATURE (Princeton).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mules and Men by Zora Neale Hurston. Philadelphia. 1935. Lippincott. Illustrations By Miguel Covarrubias & Introduction By Franz Boas. 343 pages.

 

A rich collection of folklore and oral history from Zora Neale Hurston.

 

mules and men no dwFROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

   MULES AND MEN is the first great collection of black America's folk world. In the 1930's, Zora Neale Hurston returned to her 'native village' of Eatonville, Florida to record the oral histories, sermons and songs, dating back to the time of slavery, which she remembered hearing as a child. In her quest, she found herself and her history throughout these highly metaphorical folk-tales, 'big old lies,' and the lyrical language of song. With this collection, Zora Neale Hurston has come to reveal and preserve a beautiful and important part of American culture.

 Hurston Zora Neale

 

Zora Neale Hurston (1891-1960) was a novelist, folklorist, and anthropologist whose fictional and factual accounts of black heritage remain unparalleled. Her many books include DUST TRACKS ON A ROAD; THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD; JONAH'S GOURD VINE; MOSES, MAN OF THE MOUNTAIN; MULES AND MEN; and EVERY TONGUE GOT TO CONFESS.

 

 

 

 

 

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Oxherding Tale by Charles Johnson. Bloomington. 1982. Indiana University Press. 176 pages. Jacket drawing by Sharon Sklar. 0253166071. 

 

A complex novel of race, slavery, history, and philosophy.

 

 

0253166071FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

 

   Andrew Hawkins' birth is the result of a huge misunderstanding. His story begins on an evening in 1837. Jonathan Polkinghorne, master of the Cripplegate plantation, and his dutiful butler, George Hawkins, drink a bit too much and decide they can't go home to their own wives--so they go home to each others'. Disaster ensues. Their wives never quite recover, George is banished to the fields, and nine months later Anna Polkinghorne gives birth to the fated narrator of OXHERDING TALE. As a youth, Andrew is caught in the perpetual battle of the sexes; as he matures, he becomes a social chameleon, who tastes life fully in both the white and the black worlds, never truly belonging to either. Charles Johnson's comic philosophical novel takes the form of a picaresque, first-person narrative. It is the story of Andrew's desperate flight from slavery, but in OXHERDING TALE bondage is spiritual as well as physical, sexual as well as racial. Andrew's adventures cover not only the landscape of the antebellum South--the horrors of the 'peculiar institution,' black suicide, and death in the mines--but also timeless questions of identity and the nature of the self. The novel's title refers to the 'Ten Oxherding Pictures' of the twelfth-century Zen artist Kuo-an Shih-yuan, which depict the progress of a young herdsman searching for his wayward ox Accordingly, the narrative skillfully interfaces Eastern philosophical traditions with the drama of black American slavery. On his way to a liberation that should surprise the reader, Andrew encounters a vivid cast of characters. There is Flo Hat-field, an aging sensualist and 'genius of love,' who satisfies her gargantuan appetites on a diet of sweets and young male slaves; Reb, the Coffinmaker, a direct pipeline to African mysteries, who reluctantly flees north with Andrew; and Horace Bannon, the ominous Soulcatcher, a bounty-hunter who does not so much catch runaways as absorb them into himself, taking on their individual quirks and idiosyncrasies. A young Karl Marx also appears, paying a funny, yet zanily plausible visit to America to meet Ezekiel Sykes-Withers, Andrew's tragic and ascetic tutor. There is Minty, a slave girl of remarkable strength, as well as the misanthropic Dr. Undercliff and his sharp-tongued daughter, Peggy, with whom Andrew achieves a rare and unexpected serenity. Brilliantly realized minor characters complete the portrait of a world that, as the narrator says, 'is ruin now, mere parable. ' Like John Fowles in The French Lieutenant's Woman, John Barth in The Sotweed Factor, and E. L. Doctorow in Ragtime, Charles Johnson has created a narrative voice that bridges present-day and past sensibilities. The form of OXHERDING TALE--at once a celebration and an exploration of a traditional genre--underscores its meaning: a fiction that fully treats slavery and liberation on every level of experience.

Johnson CharlesCHARLES JOHNSON'S first novel, FAITH AND THE GOOD THING, was called by the Washington Post a book 'of rare eloquence and originality, a fable that entertains and informs. ' Mr. Johnson is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Washington, fiction editor of the Seattle Review, author of the PBS Visions drama 'Charlie Smith and the Fritter Tree,' and recently a producer-writer for the PBS series Up and Coming. He lives in Seattle with his wife, Joan, and their two children, Malik and Elizabeth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Enthusiasts by Robert Musil. New York. 1983. Performing Arts Journal Publications. Translated from the German by Andrea Simon. Introduction by Martin Esslin. 103 pages. Cover design by Steven Hoffman. 093382646x.

 

A recent rediscovery from the Austrian literary giant.

 

 

093382646xFROM THE PUBLISHER -

   In his play THE ENTHUSIASTS, Robert Musil brings together a fascinating group of characters, including a detective who tries to unravel their mysterious couplings, in a country home outside a city. The time is pre-World War I, when the old world order is crumbling, and even the most sophisticated individual must struggle to understand changing views of sexuality, reason, science, and human commitment. Musil's philosophical erotic comedy, with its new ideas about dialogue and behavior, its skepticism, wit, and poetic use of language, was controversial in its time (1922), and only recently was it rediscovered by German-speaking audiences. Robert Musil, widely known for his trilogy THE MAN WITHOUT QUALITIES and YOUNG TORLESS, is one of this century's remarkable writers, though his plays are unknown to English-speaking audiences. In his Introduction, Martin Esslin calls the play 'revolutionary and innovative' both in style and subject matter. For too long Robert Musil has been a missing link in European dramatic literature-now is the time for American audiences to see his achievements in the context of twentieth-century developments in theatre.

 

 

Musil RobertRobert Musil was born in Klagenfurt, Austria, on November 6,1880, the son of a successful engineer. He was educated at military academies and received a diploma in engineering from the Technical University in Br?nn. Engineering, however, failed to satisfy his increasing interest in literature and the humanities. He then studied philosophy and experimental psychology at the University of Berlin, where he received his Ph.D. degree in 1908. The publication of his first novel, YOUNG TORLESS, in 1906 and its immediate recognition led him to abandon a career as an academic philosopher and devote himself to writing. After his marriage in 1911 he worked as a librarian at the Technical University in Vienna and then moved in 1913 to Berlin to become an editor of Neue Rundschau. During these years his writing suffered. Musil-served as an officer in the Austrian Army from 1914-1918 and after the war held various government posts in Vienna until 1922, when he decided to live as a free-lance writer. He wrote plays and stories, dramatic criticism for various newspapers, and contributed essays and criticism to a number of literary journals. In the early Twenties he conceived his major work, THE MAN WITHOUT QUALITIES, which continued to occupy him for the rest of his life. Volume I appeared in 1930, Volume II in 1933, but the work was never completed. After Hitler's coming to power and the Nazi Anschluss, Musil left Vienna permanently and emigrated to Switzerland, where he led a quiet existence, working continuously at THE MAN WITHOUT QUALITIES, until his death on April 15, 1942, in Geneva. It was only after World War II that Robert Musil's importance as one of the major figures of contemporary literature began to be recognized. More than a thousand reviews, articles and critical essays on his work have been published since 1948, and editions of his work are now available in many languages throughout the world.

 

Slouching Towards Bethlehem by Joan Didion. New York. 1968. Farrar Straus Giroux. 238 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Lawrence Ratzkin.

 

slouching towards bethlehemFROM THE PUBLISHER - 

 

 

It is a commonplace among observers of the American literary scene that some of the most exciting writing these days is appearing in magazine articles and essays rather than in stories or novels. Aficionados are aware that some of the most remarkable of these pieces are being written by a young woman named Joan Didion. The author of a highly regarded. first novel, RUN RIVER, Miss Didion has been writing regularly over the past few years for Holiday, Vogue, The Saturday Evening Post, and elsewhere, building a following just as Tom Wolfe did before the appearance of THE KANDY-KOLORED TANGERINE-FLAKE STREAMLINE BABY. In SLOUCHING TOWARDS BETHLEHEM, Miss Didion has brought together the best of her nonfiction writing, keynoted by her extraordinary report on life among the hippies of San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district. This essay, a brilliant evocation of the life style of the ‘flower generation,’ sets the tone of the book, both in its very personal confrontation between author and subject, and in its underlying theme. For most of the essays deal, in one way or another, with the atomization of modern life, the sense that ‘things fall apart, the center cannot hold,’ and with the new gods, the new ways of living that are replacing traditional ones. Also among the twenty essays in the book are ‘Some Dreamers of the Golden Dream,’ which has been described as telling ‘more about California today than could be uncovered by a task force of sociologists working for a year’; ‘Goodbye to All That,’ an account of the author’s encounter with the illusion and delusion that is New York; ‘John Wayne: A Love Song’; an anatomy of Hawaii called ‘Letter from Paradise, 210 19’ N., 1570 52’ W.’; ‘Los Angeles Notebook’; and ‘The Seacoast of Despair,’ about the mansions of Newport. Joan Didion writes throughout not just as a reporter of events and people, but also as a reporter of ‘how it feels to me.’ And her style is almost perfectly tuned to express both her feelings and her remarkably acute vision of the contemporary scene. CONTENTS: I. LIFE STYLES IN THE GOLDEN LAND - Some Dreamers of the Golden Dream; John Wayne: A Love Song; Where the Kissing Never Stops; Comrade Laski, C.P.U.S.A. (M.#NAME?.); 7000 Romaine, Los Angeles 38; California Dreaming; Marrying Absurd; Slouching Towards Bethlehem; II. PERSONALS - On Keeping a Notebook; On Self-Respect; I Can’t Get That Monster out of My Mind; On Morality; On Going Home; III. SEVEN PLACES OF THE MIND - Notes from a Native Daughter; Letter from Paradise, 21° 19’ N., 157° 52’ W; Rock of Ages; The Seacoast of Despair; Guaymas, Sonora; Los Angeles Notebook; Didion JoanGoodbye to All That.

 

 

Joan Didion (born December 5, 1934) is an American author best known for her novels and her literary journalism. Her novels and essays explore the disintegration of American morals and cultural chaos, where the overriding theme is individual and social fragmentation. A sense of anxiety or dread permeates much of her work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Pitching Around Fidel: A Journey into the Heart of Cuban Sports by S. L. Price. Gainesville. 2014. University Press of Florida. 288 pages. paperback. 9780813049687. 

 

 

9780813049687FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   In an artful pastiche of observation, personal narrative, interviews, and investigative reporting, S.L. Price, a senior writer for Sports Illustrated, describes sports and athletes in today's Cuba. On his journeys to the island, Price finds a country that celebrates sports like no other and a regime that uses games as both symbol and weapon in its dying revolution. He finds Olympic and world champion boxers, track stars, volleyball and baseball players, but he also finds that with Castro's revolution staggering beneath the weight of a great depression, Cuba's famed sports system is imploding. Athletes are defecting by plane and raft. Superstars bike to games and legends like boxer Teofilo Stevenson are forced to lost themselves in a bottle of rum. Beyond an examination of sports in the hothouse of revolution, Pitching Around Fidel presents a vibrant and realistic portrait of Cuba today, complete with sex-happy tourists, blackouts, Fidel's famous former lover, and a black-power fugitive wanted in the U.S. for murder and hijacking. At once a biting travelogue and a meditation on sports in both America and Cuba, Pitching Around Fidel is a valuable document about a time and place that is close to fading away. 'Fascinating.'--Chicago Tribune. 'Unprecedented. Astonishing.'--Miami Herald. 'A rarity: a balanced, compassionate, intimate journal of Cuba's slow, agonizing decay.'--Sports Illustrated. 'Price describes a lovely, proud, impoverished people caught in [a] repressive system that destroys thousands as it celebrates a handful.'--Kirkus 'Takes the wider view, poking its nose into the politics and culture of Cuba every few pages. Price has an easy, lyrical style that elevates his work beyond the usual sports fare.'--Business Week. 'Fascinating, sometimes hilarious, often heart-wrenching.'--Philadelphia Inquirer. 'Easily the most engaging book on Cuban sports--if not Cuba--published in many years.'--Baseball America. 'Offers a rare and provocative tour of the world's most remarkable sports culture. It's an unforgettable story of supremely gifted athletes, the utter madness of politics, and the scent of big money across the sea.'--Carl Price S LHiaasen. 'Price is one of the finest writers on sports anywhere.'--USA Today.

 

 

S. L. Price, a senior writer at Sports Illustrated since 1994, has been called a “Master of the New Journalism” by the New York Times. An award-winning former columnist and feature writer at the Miami Herald and the Sacramento Bee, he is also the author of Far Afield, which Esquire named one of the five best books of 2007, and Heart of the Game, which was named the #1 baseball book of 2009 by Baseball America.

 

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Mining Capitalism: The Relationship between Corporations and Their Critics by Stuart Kirsch. Berkeley. 2014. University of California Press. 314 pages. paperback. 9780520281714. 

 

 

9780520281714FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Corporations are among the most powerful institutions of our time, but they are also responsible for a wide range of harmful social and environmental impacts. Consequently, political movements and nongovernmental organizations increasingly contest the risks that corporations pose to people and nature. Mining Capitalism examines the strategies through which corporations manage their relationships with these critics and adversaries. By focusing on the conflict over the Ok Tedi copper and gold mine in Papua New Guinea, Stuart Kirsch tells the story of a slow-moving environmental disaster and the international network of indigenous peoples, advocacy groups, and lawyers that sought to protect local rivers and rain forests. Along the way, he analyzes how corporations promote their interests by manipulating science and invoking the discourses of sustainability and social responsibility. Based on two decades of anthropological research, this book is comparative in scope, showing readers how similar dynamics operate in other industries around the world. 'Mining Capitalism is excellent. It makes a much-needed contribution to understanding our contemporary historical moment. Kirsch adeptly moves his focus between close-to-the-ground descriptions of corporate practices and persuasive claims about the ways that corporations work to control meaning and money.'-Kim Fortun, author of Advocacy After Bhopal. 'Kirsch presents a richly detailed study of global corporate attitudes towards natural resources and the politics that inform indigenous social movements facing global capitalist interests. This is a vivid account of how the globalization of nature affects societies that have vastly different understandings of what natural resources mean.'-Arjun Appadurai, Goddard Professor of Media, Culture, and Communication. 'Mining Capitalism takes us from the devastation of a river to the courtrooms and commissions where activists and thieves reimagine its truth and consequences. This is a thrilling story, and everyone should read it. As both participant and perceptive observer, Kirsch offers us engaged anthropology at its very best.'-Anna Tsing, coeditor of Words in Motion: Toward a Global Lexicon.

 

 

Stuart Kirsch is an anthropologist who has worked extensively on indigenous rights in the Pacific, especially in relation to the Ok Tedi mine in Papua New Guinea. He earned a doctoral degree at the University of Pennsylvania, and is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Michigan. He is the author of Reverse Anthropology: Indigenous Analysis of Social and Environmental Relations in New Guinea (Stanford 2006) and Mining Capitalism (California 2014). Dr. Kirsch has consulted widely on environmental issues and land rights for the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights, the World Bank, the Nuclear Claims Tribunal, and numerous NGOs and law firms. 

 

 

 

 

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Murder on the Thirty-First Floor by Per Wahlöö. London. 2012. Vintage Books. 215 pages. paperback. 9780099554769. Cover photograph: ER Productions/Corbis. Translated from the Swedish by Sara Death. 

 

 

9780099554769FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

 

Chief Inspector Jensen investigates a bomb threat made to the nation's publishing conglomerate, supposedly in retaliation for a murder. 

 

 

 

 

Wahloo PerPer Wahlöö (1926-1975) was a Swedish writer and journalist, who published with his wife Maj Sjöwall the widely translated series novels of Martin Beck and his colleagues at the Central Bureau of Investigation in Stockholm. Its style has been described as ‘reportal. spare, disciplined and full of sharply observed detail. .’ The critic and awarded mystery writer H.R.F. Keating selected Roseanna (1965) in 1987 for his list of the one hundred best crime novels. Several of the books have also been adapted into screen. Per Wahlöö was born in Göteborg, the son of Waldemar and Karin (Svensson) Wahlöö. After graduating from the University of Lund in 1946, he worked as a journalist, covering criminal and social issues for a number of newspapers and magazines. In the 1950s Wahlöö was engaged in radical political causes, activities that resulted in his deportation from Franco's Spain in 1957. Before becoming a full-time writer, he wrote a number of television and radio plays, and was managing editor of several magazines. As a novelist Wahlöö made his debut with HIMMELSGETEN (1959), which was followed by others dealing with abuses of power and the dark side of the society. Wahlöö's science fiction thrillers include MORD PÅ 31 (1965, THE THIRTY-FIRST FLOOR), which was filmed as Kamikaze in 1989, starring the director Rainer Werner Fassbinder in his final screen role. The story was set in a futuristic Germany. STÄLSPRANGET (1968, STEEP SPRING) depicted a deadly plague in Sweden. The protagonist in both novels was Chief Inspector Jensen. GENERALERNA (1965), a trial novel set in a military state, reflected Wahlöö's views on dictatorship. LASTBILEN (1962) was published in the United States as A NECESSARY ACTION and in Britain as THE LORRY. UPPDRAGET (1963), set in a Latin American country, gained an international success. It was translated into English under the title The Assignment. In 1961 Wahlöö met Maj Sjöwall when they were working for magazines published by the same company. At that time Wahlöö was married, Sjöwall was a single parent of a daughter. They became lovers and married. The carefully planned crime novel series was created in the evenings, after their children had been put to bed. Starting from ROSEANNA (1965), their project ended ten years and ten books later with TERRORISTERNA (1975). According to Wahlöö, their intention was to ‘use the crime novel as a scalpel cutting open the belly of the ideological pauperized and morally debatable so-called welfare state of the bourgeois type.’ The narrative focused on realistic police routine and teamwork – rather the deductive leaps of a Hercule Poirot type individual – and was compared to Georges Simenon. The first three novels, ROSEANNA, a story of rape-murder of an American girl whose body in found in a Swedish canal, THE MAN WHO WENT UP IN SMOKE (1966) and THE MAN ON THE BALCONY (1967), were straightforward police procedural novels. They introducing the central characters – the solid, methodical detective Martin Beck with failing marriage, ex-paratrooper Lennart Kollberg, who hates violence and refuses to carry a gun, Gunvald Larsson, wildman and a drop-out from high society, Einar Rönn from the rural north of Sweden and patrolmen Kristiansson and Kvant, the necessary comic pair. Beck considers himself ‘stubborn and logical, and completely calm’. He lives in a small apartment in Stockholm with his wife, Inga, and two children. In the following books Beck's relationship with his wife deteriorates, and he begins an affair with the liberal Rhea Nilsen. THE LAUGHING POLICEMAN (1968), about the investigation of the murder of eight occupants of a Stockholm bus, was made into a film in 1973, directed by Stuart Rosenberg and starring Walter Matthau, Bruce Dern, and Lou Gossett. The story was set in San Francisco. The film shared its Bay area locale with Dirty Harry (1971), but was otherwise more downbeat. At the end of THE LOCKED ROOM (1972), Sjöwall and Wahlöö show their sympathy towards a bank robber; however, they abhor sexual violence. In COP KILLER (1974) Lennart Kollberg writes his resignation, because of his socialist world view. The later novels, and especially the last, THE TERRORIST, is a bitter analysis of the welfare state, and openly sides with criminals-as-revolutionaries. At the end, Beck is deeply ambivalent about remaining a policeman, because he fears that he is contributing to the violent nature of Swedish society rather than preventing it. The novel was published after Wahlöö's death in Stockholm on June 23, 1975. Though a joint venture, the book was mostly written by Wahlöö, who was already very ill. Wahlöö's other works include translations into Swedish of some Ed McBain's 87th Precinct procedural novels and Noel Behn's political thriller THE KREMLIN LETTER, filmed by John Huston in 1970. With Sjöwall he also edited the literature magazine Peripeo, and wrote a comparative study of police methods in Sweden, the United States, Russia, and England. ‘He was an extreme Left-winger with a taste for popular sport,’ said the English mystery writer Julian Symons of Wahlöö, ‘and his interest in British football. was passionate. The books he wrote with Maj Sjöwall represents an attempt to bring his political feelings into a literary form with a wide appeal.’

 

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Hauptmann's Ladder: A Step-by-Step Analysis of the Lindbergh Kidnapping by Richard T. Cahill Jr.. Kent. 2014. Kent State University Press. 402 pages. paperback. 9781606351932. Cover image courtesy of the New Jersey State Police Museum. True Crime History (Kent State).

 

9781606351932FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

 

   In 1936, Bruno Richard Hauptmann was executed for the kidnapping and murder of Charles Lindbergh Jr. Almost all of America believed Hauptmann guilty; only a few magazines and tabloids published articles questioning his conviction. In the ensuing decades, many books about the Lindbergh case have been published. Some have declared Hauptmann the victim of a police conspiracy and frame-up, and one posited that Lindbergh actually killed his own son and fabricated the entire kidnapping to mask the deed. Because books about the crime have been used as a means to advance personal theories, the truth has often been sacrificed and readers misinformed. Hauptmann's Ladder is a testament to the truth that counters the revisionist histories all too common in the true crime genre. Author Richard T. Cahill Jr. puts the true back in true crime, providing credible information and undistorted evidence that enables readers to form their own opinions and reach their own conclusions. Cahill presents conclusions based upon facts and documentary evidence uncovered in his twenty years of research. Using primary sources and painstakingly presenting a chronological reconstruction of the crime and its aftermath, he debunks false claims and explodes outrageous theories, while presenting evidence that has never before been revealed. Hauptmann's Ladder is a meticulously researched examination of the Lindbergh kidnapping that restores and preserves the truth of the crime of the century.

 

 

Richard T. Cahill Jr. received a B.A. in history and political science from Mount Saint Mary College and a J.D. from Albany Law School. His professional experience includes clerking for a criminal court judge, serving as both an assistant district attorney and a criminal defense attorney, and practicing civil law.

 

 

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Even Now: Poems by Hugo Claus. Brooklyn. 2013. Archipelago Books. 245 pages. paperback. 9781935744887. Cover design by David Bullin. Selected and translated from the Dutch by David Colmer. With an afterword by Cees Nooteboom. 

 

9781935744887FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Beautifully translated from the Dutch by David Colmer, the IMPAC Award-winning translator of Gerbrand Bakker's The Twin, Hugo Claus's poems are remarkable for their dexterity, intensity of feeling, and acute intelligence. From the richly associative and referential 'Oostakker Poems' to the emotional and erotic outpouring of the 'mad dog stanzas' in 'Morning, You,' from his interpretations of Shakespeare's sonnets to a modern adaptation of a Sanskrit masterpiece, this volume reveals the breadth and depth of Claus's stunning output. Perhaps Belgium's leading figure of postwar Dutch literature, Claus has long been associated with the avant-garde: these poems challenge conventional bourgeois mores, religious bigotry, and authoritarianism with visceral passion. The prose, poetry, and paintings of Hugo Claus (1929-2008) were as influential as they were groundbreaking. His novels include Wonder (Archipelago Books), The Sorrow of Belgium, his magnum opus of postwar Europe, as well as Desire, The Swordfish, Mild Destruction, Rumors, and The Duck Hunt. In addition to his writing, he was a painter, playwright, and director. Claus was the recipient of seven state prizes in Claus HugoBelgium, the Prize for Dutch Literature, and the Leipzig Book Award for European Understanding for his body of work.

 

 

The prose, poetry, and paintings of Hugo Claus (April 5, 1929, Bruges, Belgium - March 19, 2008, Antwerp, Belgium) were as influential as they were groundbreaking. His novels include Wonder (Archipelago Books), The Sorrow of Belgium, his magnum opus of postwar Europe, as well as Desire, The Swordfish, Mild Destruction, Rumors, and The Duck Hunt. In addition to his writing, he was a painter, playwright, and director. Claus was the recipient of seven state prizes in Belgium, the Prize for Dutch Literature, and the Leipzig Book Award for European Understanding for his body of work.

 

 

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Hermann Hesse's Fictions of the Self: Autobiography and the Confessional Imagination by Eugene L. Stelzig. Princeton. 1988. Princeton University Press. 346 pages. hardcover. 0691067503. 

 

 

0691067503FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   This masterful synthesis of criticism and biography surveys all of Hermann Hesse's major works and many of his minor ones in relation to the intricate psychological design of his entire life history. Eugene Stelzig examines what it means to be an ‘autobiographical writer’ by considering Hesse's fictions of the self as an exemplary instance of the relationship between life and art and between biography and autobiography. In a graceful and inviting style, he frees this major confessional writer from the confines of German culture and the status of ‘cult figure’ of the 1960s, and situates him in the tradition of world literature and in a variety of literary, psychological, philosophical, and religious contexts. Three introductory chapters on autobiography and Hesse set the stage for a chronological study. Then follows a penetrating analysis of the balance between biographical fact and confessional fantasy in Hesse's long career, from the failed autobiography of his first literary success, Beneath the Wheel, through the protracted midlife crisis of the grotesque Steppenwolf period, to the visionary Stelzig Eugene Lautobiography of his magisterial fictional finale, The Glass Bead Game.

 

 Eugene L. Stelzig is Distinguished Teaching Professor and Chair of the Department of English, SUNY Geneseo.

 

 

 

 

 

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The Lizard's Tale by Jose Donoso. Evanston. 2011. Northwestern University Press. 205 pages. hardcover. 9780810127029. Jacket design by Marianne Jankowski. Translated from the Spanish by Suzanne Jill Levine. Edited by Julio Ortega. 

 

9780810127029FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Winner of 2012 PEN Center USA Literary Award for Translation. José Donoso was the leading Chilean representative of the Latin American ‘Boom’ of the sixties and seventies that included Gabriel García Márquez, Mario Vargas Llosa, and Manuel Puig, among others. Written as a draft in 1973, set aside, and forgotten, The Lizard’s Tale was discovered among Donoso’s papers at Princeton University by his daughter after his death. Edited for publication by critic and poet Julio Ortega, it was published posthumously in Spanish under the title Lagartija sin cola in 2007. Suzanne Jill Levine, who knew Donoso and translated two of his earlier works, brings the book to an English-language audience for the first time. Defeated and hiding in his Barcelona apartment, painter Antonio Muñoz-Roa—clearly Donoso’s alter ego—relates the story of his flight with Luisa, his cousin, lover, and benefactor, after his scandalous desertion from the ‘Informalist’ movement (a witty reference to a contemporary Spanish art movement and possibly an allusion to the Boom as well), in which he had been a member of a certain standing. Frustrated, old, and alone, the artist looks back on his years in the small town of Dors, a place he unsuccessfully tried to rescue from the crushing advance of modernity, and on the decline of his own family, also threatened by the changing times. In Levine’s able hands, Donoso’s clear prose shines through, forming a compact, powerful, and still-relevant meditation on the commercialization of art and the very places we inhabit.

 

 

Donoso JoseJosé Donoso Yáñez (October 5, 1924–December 7, 1996) was a Chilean writer. He lived most of his life in Chile, although he spent many years in self-imposed exile in Mexico, the United States (Iowa) and mainly Spain. Although he had left his country in the sixties for personal reasons, after 1973 he said his exile was also a form of protest against the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet. He returned to Chile in 1981 and lived there until his death. Donoso is the author of a number of remarkable stories and novels, which contributed greatly to the Latin American literary boom. The term 'Boom' was coined in his 1972 essay Historia personal del ‘boom’. His best known works include the novels Coronación, El lugar sin límites (The Place Without Limits) and El obsceno pájaro de la noche (The Obscene Bird of Night). His works deal with a number of themes, including sexuality, the duplicity of identity, psychology, and a sense of dark humor. After his death, his personal papers at the University of Iowa revealed his homosexuality; a revelation that caused a certain controversy in Chile.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Reading Basquiat: Exploring Ambivalence in American Art by Jordana Moore Saggese. Berkeley. 2014. University of California Press. 222 pages. hardcover. 9780520276246. Cover design by Sandy Drooker. 

 

 

9780520276246FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Before his death at the age of twenty-seven, Jean-Michel Basquiat completed nearly 2,000 works. These unique compositions-collages of text and gestural painting across a variety of media-quickly made Basquiat one of the most important and widely known artists of the 1980s. Reading Basquiat provides a new approach to understanding the range and impact of this artist's practice, as well as its complex relationship to several key artistic and ideological debates of the late twentieth century, including the instability of identity, the role of appropriation, and the boundaries of expressionism. Jordana Moore Saggese argues that Basquiat, once known as ?the black Picasso,' probes not only the boundaries of blackness but also the boundaries of American art. Weaving together the artist's interests in painting, writing, and music, this groundbreaking book expands the parameters of aesthetic discourse to consider the parallels Basquiat found among these disciplines in his exploration of the production of meaning. Most important, Reading Basquiat traces the ways in which Basquiat constructed large parts of his identity-as a black man, as a musician, as a painter, and as a writer-via the manipulation of texts in his own library. 'A brilliant book and a great read. At long last, a deeply researched text on Basquiat's project.' -Jonathan Fineberg, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 'Challenging prevailing assumptions about the work of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Saggese argues that Basquiat's practice was as much conceptual as expressive. Reading Basquiat turns the focus from the artist's lifestyle to his work and the ways in which his approach to appropriation and Saggese Jordana Mooreimprovisation addressed the artistic discourse of the 1980s. With this book, Saggese changes the conversation about Basquiat and African Americans' participation in contemporary art.' -John P. Bowles, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

 

Jordana Moore Saggese is Assistant Professor of Contemporary Art in the Visual Studies Program at California College of the Arts.

 

 

 

 

 

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Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman by Peter Korn. Boston. 2014. David R. Godine. 181 pages. hardcover. 9781567925111. 

 

 

9781567925111FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

 

   The good life that society prescribes -- the untrammeled pursuit of wealth and fame, leisure and consumption -- often leaves some essential part of us malnourished. We may be capable, competent individuals yet find ourselves starved for avenues of engagement that provide more satisfying sustenance. Furniture making, practiced as a craft in the twenty-first century, is a decidedly marginal occupation. Yet the view from the periphery can be illuminating. For woodworker Peter Korn, the challenging work of bringing something new and meaningful into the world through one's own volition -- whether in the arts, the kitchen, or the marketplace -- is exactly what generates the authenticity, meaning, and fulfillment for which many of us yearn. In this moving account, Korn explores the nature and rewards of creative practice. We follow his search for meaning as an Ivy-educated child of the middle class who finds employment as a novice carpenter on Nantucket, transitions to self-employment as a designer/maker of fine furniture, takes a turn at teaching and administration at Colorado's Anderson Ranch Arts Center, and finally founds a school in Maine: the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship, an internationally respected, non-profit institution. This is not a 'how-to' book in any sense. Korn wants to get at the why of craft in particular, and the satisfactions of creative work in general, to understand their essential nature. How does the making of objects shape our identities? How do the products of creative work inform society? In short, what does the process of making things reveal to us about ourselves? Korn draws on four decades of hands-on experience to answer these questions eloquently, and often poignantly, in this personal, introspective, and revealing book. 'Peter Korn writes that his work as a furniture-maker tries to accomplish three goals: integrity, simplicity, and grace. Fortunately, these qualities are also what distinguish his writing. In this book, he gives the reader an almost tangible sense of what it takes to be a creative craftsman, a homo faber, a maker of things, which is one of the central elements of the human condition. But he does much more than that: he explores what the search for self and for belonging entails in our rapidly changing times.' --Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. 'Peter Korn's brilliant new book resonates with me as a visual artist in a profound way. I share his passion for craft and admire his ability to take a plank of wood and fashion anything he sets his mind to. Throughout the centuries, furniture makers and painters have shared a set of belief systems centered on craft. The pleasure and calm that I get as a painter fashioning a complicated work from colored dirt on canvas is, I believe,Korn Peter the same pleasure and peace that Peter Korn and his students get as craftsmen.' --Chuck Close.

 

 

Peter Korn is the founder and Executive Director of the Centre for Furniture Craftmanship, a woodworking and design school in Rockport, Maine. A furniture maker since 1974, his work has been exhibited in galleries and museums across the United States. In addition to writing Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman, which won the 2014 Maine Literary Award, Korn is the author of several how-to books. These include the bestselling Woodworking Basics: Mastering the Essentials of Craftsmanship and The Woodworker's Guide to Hand Tools.

 

 

 

 

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2666 by Roberto Bolaño. New York. 2008. Farrar Straus Giroux. 898 pages. hardcover. 9780374100148. Jacket art - Gustave Moreau, 'Jupiter and Semele', oil on canvas. Jacket design by Charlotte Strick. Translated from the Spanish by Natasha Wimmer. 

 

9780374100148FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

 

   Composed in the last years of Roberto Bolaño’s life, 2666 was greeted across Europe and Latin America as his highest achievement, surpassing even his previous work in its strangeness, beauty, and scope. Its throng of unforgettable characters includes academics and convicts, an American sportswriter, an 9780374531553elusive German novelist, and a teenage student and her widowed, mentally unstable father. Their lives intersect in the urban sprawl of Santa Teresa - a fictional Juárez - on the U.S.-Mexico border, where hundreds of young factory workers, in the novel as in life, have disappeared.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bolaño Roberto   Author of 2666 and many other acclaimed works, Roberto Bolaño (1953-2003) was born in Santiago, Chile, and later lived in Mexico, Paris, and Spain. He has been acclaimed ‘by far the most exciting writer to come from south of the Rio Grande in a long time’ (Ilan Stavans, The Los Angeles Times),’ and as ‘the real thing and the rarest’ (Susan Sontag). Among his many prizes are the extremely prestigious Herralde de Novela Award and the Premio Rómulo Gallegos. He was widely considered to be the greatest Latin American writer of his generation. He wrote nine novels, two story collections, and five books of poetry, before dying in July 2003 at the age of 50.

 

 

 

 

 

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The Bat: The First Harry Hole Thriller by Jo Nesbø. London. 2012. Harvill Secker. 374 pages. paperback. 9781846556005. Translated from the Norwegian by Don Bartlett.

 

9781846556005FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

 

   The first Inspector Harry Hole novel. Inspector Harry Hole of the Oslo Crime Squad is dispatched to Sydney to observe a murder case. Harry is free to offer assistance, but he has firm instructions to stay out of trouble. The victim is a twenty-three year old Norwegian woman who is a minor celebrity back home. Never one to sit on the sidelines, Harry befriends one of the lead detectives, and one of the witnesses, as he is drawn deeper into the case. Together, they discover that this is only the latest in a string of unsolved murders, and the pattern points toward a psychopath working his way across the country. As they circle closer and closer to the killer, Harry begins to fear that no one is safe, least of all those investigating the case.

 

 

Nesbø JoJo Nesbø’s books, translated into forty-seven languages, have sold more than fifteen million copies worldwide. His previous Harry Hole novels include THE REDBREAST, NEMESIS, THE DEVIL’S STAR THE SNOWMAN, and THE LEOPARD, and he is the author of HEADHUNTERS and several children’s books. He has received the Glass Key Award for best Nordic crime novel. He is also a musician, songwriter, and economist and lives in Oslo.

 

 

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Tiny Game Hunting: Environmentally Healthy Ways to Trap and Kill the Pests in Your House and Garden New Edition by Hilary Dole Klein and Adrian M. Wenner. Berkeley. 2001. University of California Press. 268 pages. paperback. 9780520221079. Line drawings by Courtlandt Johnson. 

 

 

9780520221079FROM THE PUBLISHER -

  

 

Every year Americans use a staggering five hundred million pounds of toxic pesticides in and around their homes, schools, parks, and roads-a growing health risk for people and the environment. But are these poisons really necessary? This book, appealing to the hunter in us all, shows how to triumph in combat with pests without losing the war to toxic chemicals. Tiny Game Hunting, written in a lively and entertaining style and illustrated with detailed drawings, gives more than two hundred tried-and-true ways to control or kill common household and garden pests without using toxic pesticides.

 

Hilary Dole Klein is a writer living in Santa Barbara and the author of A Guide to Nonsexist Children's Books (1976) and Substituting Ingredients (third edition, 1994), among other books. Adrian M. Wenner is Professor Emeritus of Natural History at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and the author of books, articles, and a chapter in Comparative Psychology of Invertebrates: The Field and Laboratory Study of Insect Behavior (1997).

 

 

 

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The Tale Of Tsar Saltan by Alexander Pushkin. New York. 1996. Dial Press. hardcover. 32 pages. Illustrated by Gennady Spirin. Based On A Translation From The Russian by Pauline Hejl. 0803720017.

 

 

0803720017FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   

 Betrayed by her jealous sisters, a Tsarina and her infant son are marooned on a barren island until a magical swan helps them regain their rightful heritage.

 

 

 

Pushkin AlexanderAlexander Sergeyevich Pushkin (6 June 1799 – 10 February 1837) was a Russian author of the Romantic era who is considered by many to be the greatest Russian poet and the founder of modern Russian literature. Pushkin was born into Russian nobility in Moscow. His matrilineal great grandfather – Abram Gannibal – was brought over as a slave from what is now Eritrea and had risen to become an aristocrat. Pushkin published his first poem at the age of fifteen, and was widely recognized by the literary establishment by the time of his graduation from the Tsarskoye Selo Lyceum. While under the strict surveillance of the Tsar's political police and unable to publish, Pushkin wrote his most famous play, the drama Boris Godunov. His novel in verse, Eugene Onegin, was serialized between 1825 and 1832. Notoriously touchy about his honour, Pushkin fought as many as twenty-nine duels, and was fatally wounded in such an encounter with Georges-Charles de Heeckeren d'Anthès. Pushkin had accused D'Anthès, a French officer serving with the Chevalier Guard Regiment of attempting to seduce the poet's wife, Natalya Pushkina.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Set the Night on fire: L.A. in the Sixties by Mike Davis and Jon Wiener. London/New York. 2020.  Verso. 9781784780227.  788 pages. hardcover. Cover design by Matt Dorfman.

 

9781784780227FROM THE PUBLISHER - 

 

A magisterial, riveting movement history of Los Angeles in the Sixties. Los Angeles in the sixties was a hotbed of political and social upheaval. The city was a launchpad for Black Power—where Malcolm X and Angela Davis first came to prominence and the Watts uprising shook the nation. The city was home to the Chicano Blowouts and Chicano Moratorium, as well as being the birthplace of “Asian American” as a political identity. It was a locus of the antiwar movement, gay liberation movement, and women’s movement, and, of course, the capital of California counterculture. Mike Davis and Jon Wiener provide the first comprehensive movement history of L.A. in the sixties, drawing on extensive archival research and dozens of interviews with principal figures, as well as the authors’ storied personal histories as activists. Following on from Davis’s award-winning L.A. history, City of Quartz, Set the Night on Fire is a historical tour de force, delivered in scintillating and fiercely beautiful prose. “Authoritative and impressive.” –Los Angeles Times. “Monumental.” –Guardian.

 

 

Davis Mike and Wiener JonMike Davis is the author of City of Quartz, Late Victorian Holocausts, Buda’s Wagon, and Planet of Slums. He is the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship and the Lannan Literary Award. He lives in San Diego. Jon Wiener is a longtime Contributing Editor at the Nation and host and producer of Start Making Sense, the magazine’s weekly podcast. He is an Emeritus Professor of U.S. history at UC Irvine, and his books include Gimme Some Truth: The John Lennon FBI Files and How We Forgot the Cold War: A Historical Journey across America. He lives in Los Angeles.

 

 

 

 

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The Conformist by Alberto Moravia. New York. 1951. Farrar Straus & Young. hardcover. 376 pages. Cover: Stefan Salter. Translated from the Italian by Angus Davidson. 

 

 

conformistFROM THE PUBLISHER -

   The Conformist tells an intense story, building from climax to climax. It keeps the reader absorbed in continuous physical and psychological action as it unravels the twists and turns of a man snared in his own destiny. It is the story of the life, loves and fate of Marcello Clerici, a high Fascist official called upon to act as a spy. His iron and bitter desire is to become not a rebel set apart from others, but a conformist in step with the crowd. So strong is his resolve and so sinister his motives that he will embrace any evil in his struggle for conformity. His fiancé says to him, looking at him with a kind of strange curiosity, ‘Most people want to be different from everyone else. but you are just the opposite: anyone would think you wanted to be like everyone else.’ All over the world and in your own community are men who falsely conform, and they are men you will recognize. Moravia has drawn a brilliant and uncompromising portrait of a type he deplores and fears. By far the finest and most important novel Moravia has written, it shows with great skill and without pity the irrational tides that sweep a man through life to shipwreck or to landfall. The character drawing is intricate and persuasive, and the book is remarkable for its many scenes, all precisely selected, that reveal motive through action. Above all, this is a story, fast and absorbing; but whether it is read as a story, as a study of the influence of sex on political behavior or as a commentary on normal life in a totalitarian regime, it is dramatic and unforgettable. Every novel Alberto Moravia has written has been building up to THE CONFORMIST. More dramatic and earthy than THE WOMAN OF ROME, more poignant than Two ADOLESCENTS, and more personal than CONJUGAL LOVE, it is his greatest book, and one of the finest novels to come out of Europe in our time.

 

 

There is also a Signet edition -

 

Paperback. 318 pages. November 1953. S1071. Translated from the Italian by Angus Davidson.

 

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

signet conformist s1071   The New Novel by the author of Woman of Rome. ‘One of the best writers in the world today.’ – Time. This uncompromising novel of the life, loves and fate of an agent of the Italian Secret Police during the 1930’s is a profound and exciting story on every level. As a melodrama of intrigue, treachery and murder, it ranks with the finest suspense fiction. And as a penetrating portrait of a man whose falseness to his true nature destroys the very security he seeks, it is gripping and revealing. More dramatic and earthy than The Woman of Rome, more poignant than Two Adolescents and more personal than Conjugal Love, The Conformist ranks as a masterpiece. ALBERTO MORAVIA is one of the most brilliant contemporary Italian novelists. He has achieved international fame with his books The Woman of Rome (Signet #5844), Conjugal Love (Signet 922), Two Adolescents (Signet #960) and The Fancy Dress Party. Farrar, Straus & Young publish the original American editions of his novels.
 

 

 

 

 

Moravia AlbertoAlberto Moravia, born Alberto Pincherle (November 28, 1907 – September 26, 1990) was an Italian novelist and journalist. His novels explored matters of modern sexuality, social alienation, and existentialism. He is best known for his debut novel Gli indifferenti (published in 1929), and for the anti-fascist novel Il Conformista (The Conformist), the basis for the film The Conformist (1970) by Bernardo Bertolucci. Other novels of his translated to the cinema are Il Disprezzo (A Ghost at Noon or Contempt) filmed by Jean-Luc Godard as Le Mépris (Contempt) (1963); La Noia (Boredom), filmed with that title by Damiano Damiani in 1963 and released in the US as The Empty Canvas in 1964; and La Ciociara filmed by Vittorio de Sica as Two Women (1960). Cedric Kahn's L'Ennui (1998) is another version of La Noia. He was an atheist. He once remarked that the most important facts of his life had been his illness, a tubercular infection of the bones that confined him to a bed for five years, and Fascism, because they both caused him to suffer and do things he otherwise would not have done. ‘It is what we are forced to do that forms our character, not what we do of our own free will.’ His writing was marked by its factual, cold , precise style, often depicting the malaise of the bourgeoisie, and was rooted in the tradition of nineteenth-century narrative, underpinned by high social and cultural awareness. In his world, where inherited social, religious and moral beliefs are no longer acceptable, he considered sex and money the only basic criteria for judging social and human reality. Moravia believed that writers must, if they were to be successful in representing reality, ‘assume a moral position, a clearly conceived political, social, and philosophical attitude’ but also that, ultimately, - ‘A writer survives in spite of his beliefs.’ Between 1959 and 1962 Moravia was President of the worldwide association of writers, PEN International.

 

 

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Fantasies Of The Master Race by Ward Churchill (edited by M. Annette Jaimes). Monroe. 1992. Common Courage Press. paperback. 304 pages. Published Simultaneously In Cloth. 0962883867.

 

 

0962883867FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Chosen an ‘Outstanding Book on the Subject of Human Rights in the United States’ by the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Human Rights. In this volume of incisive essays, Ward Churchill looks at representations of American Indians in literature and film, delineating a history of cultural propaganda that has served to support the continued colonization of Native America. During each phase of the genocide of American Indians, the media has played a critical role in creating easily digestible stereotypes of Indians for popular consumption. Literature about Indians was first written and published in order to provoke and sanctify warfare against them. Later, the focus changed to enlisting public support for ‘civilizing the savages,’ stripping them of their culture and assimilating them into the dominant society. Now, in the final stages of cultural genocide, it is the appropriation and stereotyping of Native culture that establishes control over knowledge and truth. The primary means by which this is accomplished is through the powerful publishing and film industries. Whether they are the tragically doomed ‘noble savages’ walking into the sunset of Dances With Wolves or Carlos Castaneda's Don Juan, the exotic mythical Indians constitute no threat to the established order. Literature and art crafted by the dominant culture are an insidious political force, disinforming people who might otherwise develop a clearer understanding of indigenous struggles for justice and freedom. This book is offered to counter that deception, and to move people to take action on issues confronting American Indians today.

 

 

Churchill WardWard LeRoy Churchill (born October 2, 1947) is an American author and political activist. He was a professor of ethnic studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder from 1990 to 2007. The primary focus of his work is on the historical treatment of political dissenters and Native Americans by the United States government. His work features controversial and provocative views, written in a direct, often confrontational style. In January 2005, Churchill's work attracted publicity because of the widespread circulation of a 2001 essay, ‘On the Justice of Roosting Chickens‘. In the essay, he claimed that the September 11 attacks were a natural and unavoidable consequence of what he views as unlawful US policy, and he referred to the ‘technocratic corps’ working in the World Trade Center as ‘little Eichmanns‘. In March 2005 the University of Colorado began investigating allegations that Churchill had engaged in research misconduct; it reported in June 2006 that he had done so. Churchill was fired on July 24, 2007, leading to a claim by some scholars that he was fired because of the ‘Little Eichmanns’ comment. Churchill filed a lawsuit against the University of Colorado for unlawful termination of employment. In April 2009 a Denver jury found that Churchill was wrongly fired, awarding him $1 in damages. In July 2009, a District Court judge vacated the monetary award and declined Churchill's request to order his reinstatement, deciding the university has ‘quasi-judicial immunity’. In February 2010, Churchill appealed the judge's decision. In November 2010, the Colorado Court of Appeals upheld the lower-court's ruling. In September 10, 2012, the Colorado Supreme Court upheld the lower courts' decisions in favor of the University of Colorado. On April 1st, 2013, the United States Supreme Court declined to hear the case.

 

 

 

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Saints And Strangers by Angela Carter. New York. 1986. Viking Press. hardcover. 126 pages. September 1986. Jacket design by Melissa Jacoby. Jacket painting The Peaceable Kingdom circa 1840-1845 by Edward Hicks. 0670811394.

 

 

0670811394FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   Spellbinding, entrancing, vital-all the words critics used to describe Carter’s Nights at the Circus apply as well to this thrilling collection by ‘the poet of the short story.’ - Lisa St. Aubin de Teran. The saints and strangers of Angela Carter’s title are those who, in the words of the Puritan settlers of Massachusetts, would colonize the New World. And in this dazzling collection of short fiction, the focus is on the New World of both fact and the imagination. Three of these eight stories are set in America-’The Fall River Axe Murders’ is a haunting cinematic prologue to that most celebrated of nineteenth-century crimes; ‘Our Lady of the Massacre’ depicts (in a completely authentic voice) the adventures of an eighteenth-century indentured servant who is kidnapped by the Indians and married to a chieftain; ‘The Cabinet of Edgar Allen Poe’ brings its obsessed hero to a kind of crippled life; and a fourth, ‘Black Venus,’ brilliantly reimagines the relationship of Charles Baudelaire to his Caribbean Creole mistress, a daughter of the New World languishing in the Old. In other stories, we are transported to the steppes of Central Asia (‘The Kiss’). an Alpine village full of mysterious happenings (‘Peter and the Wolf’), an enchanted forest (‘Overture and Incidental Music to A Midsummer Night’s Dream’), and an Edwardian kitchen (‘The Kitchen Child’). In each case, we are caught by the tale-spinning magic that distinguishes Angela Carter’s best work. Yet these stories do more than dazzle us with glittering prose and eccentric flights of fancy. Each speaks with an achingly human voice and embraces the frailty and mystery of the flesh. Whether they are saints or strangers, the subjects of Angela Carter’s latest book are unforgettable.

 

 

Carter AngelaAngela Carter (7 May 1940 – 16 February 1992) was an English novelist and journalist, known for her feminist, magical realism, picaresque and science fiction works. In 2008, The Times ranked Carter tenth, in their list of ‘The 50 greatest British writers since 1945’ Born Angela Olive Stalker in Eastbourne, in 1940, Carter was evacuated as a child to live in Yorkshire with her maternal grandmother. As a teenager she battled anorexia. She began work as a journalist on the Croydon Advertiser, following in the footsteps of her father. Carter attended the University of Bristol where she studied English literature. She married twice, first in 1960 to Paul Carter. They divorced after twelve years. In 1969 Angela Carter used the proceeds of her Somerset Maugham Award to leave her husband and relocate for two years to Tokyo, Japan, where she claims in NOTHING SACRED (1982) that she ‘learnt what it is to be a woman and became radicalised.’ She wrote about her experiences there in articles for New Society and a collection of short stories, FIREWORKS: NINE PROFANE PIECES (1974), and evidence of her experiences in Japan can also be seen in THE INFERNAL DESIRE MACHINES OF DOCTOR HOFFMAN (1972). She then explored the United States, Asia and Europe, helped by her fluency in French and German. She spent much of the late 1970s and 1980s as a writer in residence at universities, including the University of Sheffield, Brown University, the University of Adelaide, and the University of East Anglia. In 1977 Carter married Mark Pearce, with whom she had one son. As well as being a prolific writer of fiction, Carter contributed many articles to The Guardian, The Independent and New Statesman, collected in SHAKING A LEG. She adapted a number of her short stories for radio and wrote two original radio dramas on Richard Dadd and Ronald Firbank. Two of her fictions have been adapted for the silver screen: The Company of Wolves (1984) and THE MAGIC TOYSHOP (1987). She was actively involved in both film adaptations, her screenplays are published in the collected dramatic writings, The Curious Room, together with her radio scripts, a libretto for an opera of Virginia Woolf's Orlando, an unproduced screenplay entitled The Christchurch Murders (based on the same true story as Peter Jackson's Heavenly Creatures) and other works. These neglected works, as well as her controversial television documentary, The Holy Family Album, are discussed in Charlotte Crofts' book, Anagrams of Desire (2003). Her novel NIGHTS AT THE CIRCUS won the 1984 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for literature. At the time of her death, Carter was embarking on a sequel to Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre based on the later life of Jane's stepdaughter, Adèle Varens. However, only a synopsis survives. Angela Carter died aged 51 in 1992 at her home in London after developing lung cancer.

 

 

 

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Stephen Hero by James Joyce. New York. 1944. New Directions. hardcover. 234 pages. Frontispiece portrait by Augustus John. Edited from the manuscript in the Harvard College Library, and introduction and editorial note, by Theodore Spencer. 

 

 

stephen hero 1944FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

 

   STEPHEN HERO is an early version of Joyce’s PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN, probably completed about 1906. It is said that when the manuscript came back to Joyce after rejection by the twentieth publisher, he threw it into the fire, from which his wife was able to rescue only a portion. The 383 pages which first came to light were edited by the late Theodore Spencer and published by New Directions in 1944 through the courtesy of the Harvard College Library; they gave a long, connected section of the original – a sequence complete in itself. The first printing was immediately exhausted and a second, very large one lasted only several years. When twenty-five additional manuscript pages, forming a complete short incident, were found, New Directions held up reprinting so that they could be included. Edited by John J. Slocum and Herbert Cahoon, the Joyce bibliographers, who also contribute an interesting foreword, the new section is here printed with the permission of the Yale University Library. It throws new light on Joyce’s attitudes and, like the rest, makes excellent reading in itself. STEPHEN HERO differs extensively from the published text of PORTRAIT both in content and it treatment; it includes many characters and incidents later cut for the sake of compression. It is more an autobiography of Joyce and less an objectivized novel. As such it throws valuable light on the development of his extraordinary genius. As a human document it is profoundly moving – the candid story of a sensitive and brilliant young Irishman’s struggle against conventions of the Dublin of his day. The new incident, which precedes the earlier published sequence in time, takes this young Irishman into cities of central Ireland, which Joyce nowhere else describes, and shows them and persons he met there with flashing insight and vividness. The main manuscript rebegins shortly after Stephen (Joyce) enters the national University, and breaks off just as his emancipation from all that the University implies reaches a kind of climax. The love interest, only briefly sketched in PORTRAIT, is developed at some length in STEPHEN HERO, and also there is much detailed material about Joyce’s family background. Perhaps because Joyce was instinctively so superb a literary craftsman, the writing of STEPHEN HERO gives little indication of being a first draft. Passage after passage offer memorable examples of his pure and powerful prose style. His wit and irony are a continual delight, particularly in Stephen’s conversations which are very fully reproduced, and in his satiric comments on people and their ideas. In addition to the new foreword which ties the new manuscript to the one originally published, Professor Spencer’s long introductory essay is reprinted. It tells the history of the manuscript, compares its structure and technique with that of the final version, analyzes its principal themes and underscores its special literary values. The volume contains relevant illustrations.

And then, there is the 1955 New Directions edition - hardcover. 251 pages.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

stephen hero new directions 1955 STEPHEN HERO is an early version of Joyce’s PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN, probably completed about 1906. It is said that when the manuscript came back to Joyce after rejection by the twentieth publisher, he threw it into the fire, from which his wife was able to rescue only a portion. The 383 pages which first came to light were edited by the late Theodore Spencer and published by New Directions in 1944 through the courtesy of the Harvard College Library; they gave a long, connected section of the original – a sequence complete in itself. The first printing was immediately exhausted and a second, very large one lasted only several years. When twenty-five additional manuscript pages, forming a complete short incident, were found, New Directions held up reprinting so that they could be included. Edited by John J. Slocum and Herbert Cahoon, the Joyce bibliographers, who also contribute an interesting foreword, the new section is here printed with the permission of the Yale University Library. It throws new light on Joyce’s attitudes and, like the rest, makes excellent reading in itself. STEPHEN HERO differs extensively from the published text of PORTRAIT both in content and it treatment; it includes many characters and incidents later cut for the sake of compression. It is more an autobiography of Joyce and less an objectivized novel. As such it throws valuable light on the development of his extraordinary genius. As a human document it is profoundly moving – the candid story of a sensitive and brilliant young Irishman’s struggle against conventions of the Dublin of his day. The new incident, which precedes the earlier published sequence in time, takes this young Irishman into cities of central Ireland, which Joyce nowhere else describes, and shows them and persons he met there with flashing insight and vividness. The main manuscript rebegins shortly after Stephen (Joyce) enters the national University, and breaks off just as his emancipation from all that the University implies reaches a kind of climax. The love interest, only briefly sketched in PORTRAIT, is developed at some length in STEPHEN HERO, and also there is much detailed material about Joyce’s family background. Perhaps because Joyce was instinctively so superb a literary craftsman, the writing of STEPHEN HERO gives little indication of being a first draft. Passage after passage offer memorable examples of his pure and powerful prose style. His wit and irony are a continual delight, particularly in Stephen’s conversations which are very fully reproduced, and in his satiric comments on people and their ideas. In addition to the new foreword which ties the new manuscript to the one originally published, Professor Spencer’s long introductory essay is reprinted. It tells the history of the manuscript, compares its structure and technique with that of the final version, analyzes its principal themes and underscores its special literary values. The volume contains relevant illustrations. James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist and poet, considered to be one of the most influential writers in the modernist avant-garde of the early 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey are paralleled in an array of contrasting literary styles, perhaps most prominent among these the stream of consciousness technique he perfected. Joyce was born in Dublin, Ireland, on February 2, 1882. He was the oldest of ten children in a family that experienced increasing financial difficulties during his childhood. After attending Clongowes Wood College and Belevedere College (both Jesuit institutions) in Dublin, he entered the Royal University, where he studied languages and philosophy. Upon his graduation, in 1902, Joyce left Ireland for France but returned the following year because his mother was dying. In 1904 he met Nora Barnacle (they fell in love on June 16, ‘Bloomsday’), and in October of that year they went together to Europe, settling in Trieste. In 1909 and again in 1912 Joyce made unsuccessful attempts to publish Dubliners, a collection of fifteen stories that he intended to be ‘a chapter of the moral history of my country focused on Dublin, ‘the centre of paralysis.’ In 1914 Dubliners finally appeared, followed by the semiautobiographical novel A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN, a reworking of an earlier manuscript, STEPHEN HERO. During the First World War Joyce and Nora lived in Zurich; in 1920 they moved to Paris, where Ulysses was published in 1922. FINNEGANS WAKE, Joyce’s most radical and complex work, began appearing in installments in 1928 and was published in its entirety in 1939. After the German occupation of Paris, Joyce and Nora (who were married in 1931) moved to Zurich, where he died in January. His complete oeuvre includes three books of poetry, a play, occasional journalism, and his published letters. Though most of his adult life was spent abroad, Joyce's fictional universe does not extend far beyond Dublin, and is populated largely by characters who closely resemble family members, enemies and friends from his time there; Ulysses in particular is set with precision in the streets and alleyways of the city. Shortly after the publication of Ulysses he elucidated this preoccupation somewhat, saying, ‘For myself, I always write about Dublin, because if I can get to the heart of Dublin I can get to the heart of all the cities of the world. In the particular is contained the universal.’

Joyce JamesJames Augustine Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist and poet, considered to be one of the most influential writers in the modernist avant-garde of the early 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey are paralleled in an array of contrasting literary styles, perhaps most prominent among these the stream of consciousness technique he perfected. Joyce was born in Dublin, Ireland, on February 2, 1882. He was the oldest of ten children in a family that experienced increasing financial difficulties during his childhood. After attending Clongowes Wood College and Belevedere College (both Jesuit institutions) in Dublin, he entered the Royal University, where he studied languages and philosophy. Upon his graduation, in 1902, Joyce left Ireland for France but returned the following year because his mother was dying. In 1904 he met Nora Barnacle (they fell in love on June 16, ‘Bloomsday’), and in October of that year they went together to Europe, settling in Trieste. In 1909 and again in 1912 Joyce made unsuccessful attempts to publish Dubliners, a collection of fifteen stories that he intended to be ‘a chapter of the moral history of my country focused on Dublin, ‘the centre of paralysis.’ In 1914 Dubliners finally appeared, followed by the semiautobiographical novel A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN, a reworking of an earlier manuscript, STEPHEN HERO. During the First World War Joyce and Nora lived in Zurich; in 1920 they moved to Paris, where Ulysses was published in 1922. FINNEGANS WAKE, Joyce’s most radical and complex work, began appearing in installments in 1928 and was published in its entirety in 1939. After the German occupation of Paris, Joyce and Nora (who were married in 1931) moved to Zurich, where he died in January. His complete oeuvre includes three books of poetry, a play, occasional journalism, and his published letters. Though most of his adult life was spent abroad, Joyce's fictional universe does not extend far beyond Dublin, and is populated largely by characters who closely resemble family members, enemies and friends from his time there; Ulysses in particular is set with precision in the streets and alleyways of the city. Shortly after the publication of Ulysses he elucidated this preoccupation somewhat, saying, ‘For myself, I always write about Dublin, because if I can get to the heart of Dublin I can get to the heart of all the cities of the world. In the particular is contained the universal.’

 

 

 

 

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Heavy Traffic & High Culture: New American Library as Literary Gatekeeper in the Paperback Revolution by Thomas L. Bonn. Carbondale. 1989. Southern Illinois University Press. hardcover. 241 pages. 0809314789.

 

 

0809314789FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

 

   This is a book about the magical names in literature, about the literary heritage of a nation balanced against a backdrop of big business; it is the story of New American library from 1946 to 1961 and of Victor Weybright, the publisher whose talismanic phrase, ‘luster and lucre,’ characterizes both the cultural and financial formu1a that guided this giant paperback house. The book is based on the editorial correspondence at NAL from the company’s beginning in 1945 until just after its purchase by the Times-Mirror Company. Generally ignoring financial, marketing, and production records, the files that form the core of this book concentrate on interoffice memoranda to and from editorial staff and feature letters to and from authors, agents, publishers, and readers. Bonn shows how Weybright and copublisher Kurt Enoch advanced NAL from a poor, scarcely tolerated relation - as were all paperback reprinters - in the publishing family to a prestigious, even proprietary publisher, initiating contracts and discovering new talent. By the middle of the l950s, many hardcover publishing houses were accepting original manuscripts based on their anticipated mass market paperback sales. Bonn employs the ‘gatekeeper’ theory of communication to account for much of NAL’s success, citing Weybright as chief gatekeeper. Explaining this theory as Weybright applied it, Bonn notes that ‘the tension on the gate’s spring is created by the cultural contribution the work is likely to make tempered by its projected balance sheet.’ Weybright brought harmony to the conflicting interests of culture vs. commerce; his goal was ‘heavy traffic, high culture’ or John Steinbeck, Tennessee Williams, William Faulkner, Truman Capote, Ernest Hemingway and others at the dimly remembered 25 cents per copy. Bonn focuses on Weybright’s dealings with Bennett Cerf and Random House, Charles Scribner’s Sons, Alfred A. Knopf, and other hardback houses to show how NAL acquired titles. In this book, notable for its previously unpublished correspondence by major figures, Bonn scores another triumph by examining the phenomenon of paperback abridgment. These letters reveal the reactions of James M. Cain, James Jones, and Robert Penn Warren when paperback economics killed as many as half of their words. Well-founded fear of censorship, these files reveal, consumed much money and time, yet of all of the books on the NAL list, only Erskine Caldwell’s God’s Little Acre was judged obscene in a courtroom. The works of James M. Cain were challenged, as were those of Faulkner, until he won his 1950 Nobel Prize. Weybright also faced a continuing battle with certain authors over paperback covers. The editor’s views as to what would sell books frequently conflicted with the opinions of his authors. William Styron acquiesced to Weybright with some grace, but the cover conflict between NAL and James T. Farrell was bitter; the rift between NAL and J. D. Salinger over covers for The Catcher in the Rye and Nine Stories grew so acrimonious that both sides lost when Salinger severed his relationship with the company. NAL published the great—William Faulkner, Norman Mailer, J. D. Salinger - and the big money-makers - Erskine Caldwell, Ian Fleming, Mickey Spillane. This ideal arrangement enabled the innovative paperback publishing company to make a profit even as it made a gigantic cultural contribution.

 

 

Thomas L. Bonn, Librarian at the State University of New York, College at Cortland, is the author of Paperback Primer: A Guide for Collectors and Under Cover: An Illustrated History of American Mass Market Paperbacks.

 

 

 

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The Business Of Books: How International Conglomerates Took Over Publishing & Changed The Way We Read by Andre Schiffrin. New York. 2000. Verso. hardcover. 181 pages. 1859847633.

 

 

1859847633FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

 

   Postwar American publishing has been ruthlessly transformed since André Schiffrin joined its ranks in 1956. Gone is a plethora of small but prestigious houses that often put ideas before profit in their publishing decisions, sometimes even deliberately. Now six behemoths share 80% of the market and profit margin is all. André Schiffrin can write about these changes with authority because he witnessed them from inside a conglomerate, as head of Pantheon, co-founded by his father bought (and sold) by Random House. And he can write about them with candor because he is no longer on the inside, having quit corporate publishing in disgust to setup a flourishing independent house, the New Press. Schiffrin’s evident affection for his authors sparkles throughout a story woven around publishing the work of those such as Studs Terkel, Noam Chomsky, Gunnar Myrdal, George Kennan, Juliet Mitchell, R.D.Laing, Eric Hobsbawm and E.P. Schiffrin AndreThompson. Part-memoir, part-history, here is an account of the collapsing standards of contemporary publishing that is irascible, acute and passionate. An engaging counterpoint to recent, celebratory memoirs of the industry written by those with more stock options and fewer scruples than Schiffrin, The Business of Books warns of the danger to adventurous, intelligent publishing in the bullring of today’s marketplace.

  

 André Schiffrin was, for thirty years, Publisher at Pantheon. He was also the Director of the New Press, which he founded in 1993. He contributed a regular column on publishing to the Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

 

 

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Paperbacks, U. S. A.: A Graphic History, 1939-1959 by Piet Schreuders. San Diego. 1981. Blue Dolphin Enterprises. paperback. 259 pages. September 1981. Translated from the Dutch by Josh Pachter. 

 

 

paperbacks usaFROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

 

   In this informative and entertaining description of the first 20 years of paperback history, the emphasis is on the way these early books looked, and especially on their covers: who made them, how they were produced, and how they changed over two decades. Piet Schreuders, editor and designer of two popular Dutch magazines (Furore and the Poezenkrant), spent five years researching the roots of this cultural phenomenon and found, besides shameless plagiarism, amateurish drawings and commercially-bred bad taste, a wealth of sensitive, human, original and unique design and art.Schreuders Piet

 

 

Piet Schreuders (Born 1951 in Rotterdam, The Netherlands) is an independent graphic designer based in Amsterdam. His specialties include magazines, books, cds, cartography and rephotography. He is a leading expert in pop culture archaeology, including the pamphlet Lay In - Lay Out, a guide to Beatles locations in London and the work of paperback illustrator James Avati. His recreations of the music of Leroy Shield, the composer of stock music from Hal Roach comedies, led to the creation of the Dutch documentary orchestra, The Beau Hunks. He is editor and designer of De Poezenkrant (a newsletter about cats) and of FURORE (a magazine about everything else). He served as art director of the weekly media magazine VPRO Gids from 1998 until 2013.

 

 

 

 

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Antipoems: New & Selected by Nicanor Parra. New York. 1985. New Directions. hardcover. 208 pages. Jacket photograph by Layle Silbert. design by Denise Breslin. Edited by David Unger Various Translators From The Spanish. 0811209598.

 

 

0811209598FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

 

   ANTIPOEMS: NEW AND SELECTED, a fresh bilingual gathering aswell as retrospective of the work of Chile’s foremost poet, reintroduces him to North American readers after thirteen years. Though he has been hardly unproductive, the politics of his homeland have channeled his inventiveness into new modes of expression, which remind us of the sometimes sly hermeticism of Italian writers, Eugenio Montale and Elio Vittorini among them, during the Fascist regime. As Frank MacShane makes clear in his introduction, Parra has not tried to escape repression, but by ‘using his wit and his humor, he has shown how the artist can still speak the truth in troubled times.’ Since much of Parra’s early work is now out of print, editor David Unger has included many of the poems which influenced North American poets such as Ferlinghetti and Merton in the ‘50s and ‘60s, some in new or revised translations. Of Parra’s more recent work, there are generous selections from Artifacts (1972), Sermons and Preachings of the Christ of Elqui (1977), New Sermons and Preachings of the Christ of Elqui (1979), Jokes to Mislead the Police (1983), Ecopoems (1983), Recent Sermons (1983), and a section of ‘Uncollected Poems’ (1984). ANTIPOEMS: NEW AND SELECTED is edited by David Unger, who contributed many of the translations to Enrique Lihn’s THE DARK ROOM AND OTHER Poems (New Directions, 1978). Professor Frank MacShane of Columbia University, in his critical introduction, gives a full evaluation of a poet who ‘is unquestionably one of the most influential and accomplished in Latin America today, heir to the position long held by his countryman, Pablo Neruda.’ CONTENTS: Introduction by Prank MacShane; Editor’s Note by David Unger; from Poemas y antipoemas/Poems and Antipoems (1954); from Nebulosa/Nebula (1950); from Versos de salon/Salon Verses (1962); from Canciones rusas/Russian Songs (1967); from Ejercicios respiratorios/Breathing Exercises (1964-66); from La camisa de fuerza/The Straitjacket (1968); Los Professores/The Teachers (1971); from Poemas de emergencia/Emergency Poems (1972); from Artefactos/Artifacts (1972); Memorias de un ataud/Memories of a Coffin (1975); from Sermones y prédicas del Cristo de Elqui/The Sermons and Preachings of the Christ of Elqui (1977); from Nuevos sermones y prédicas del Cristo de Elqui/New Sermons and Preachings of the Christ of Elqui (1979); from Chistes parRa desorientar a la policia/Jokes to Mislead the Police (1983); from Ecopoemas/Eco poems (1983); from Ultimos sermones/Recent Sermons (1983); from Poemas inéditos/Uncollected Poems (1984); Index of titles (Spanish); Index of titles (English).

 

 

Parra NicanorNicanor Parra Sandoval (born 5 September 1914) is a Chilean poet, mathematician, and physicist. He is considered an influential poet in Chile and throughout Latin America. Some rank him among the most important poets of Spanish language literature. Parra describes himself as an ‘anti-poet,’ due to his distaste for standard poetic pomp and function; after recitations he exclaims ‘Me retracto de todo lo dicho’ (‘I take back everything I said’). Parra, the son of a schoolteacher, was born in 1914 in San Fabián de Alico, Chile, near Chillán in southern Chile. He comes from the artistically prolific Parra family of performers, musicians, artists, and writers. His sister, Violeta Parra, was a folk singer, as was his brother Roberto Parra Sandoval. In 1933, he entered the Instituto Pedagógico of the University of Chile, and qualified as a teacher of mathematics and physics in 1938, one year after his first book, Cancionero sin Nombre, appeared. After teaching in Chilean secondary schools, in 1943 he enrolled in Brown University in the United States to study physics. In 1948, he attended Oxford University to study cosmology. He returned to Chile as a professor at the Universidad de Chile in 1946. Since 1952, Parra has been professor of theoretical physics in Santiago and has read his poetry in England, France, Russia, Mexico, Cuba, and the United States. He has published several books. Parra chooses to leave behind the conventions of poetry; his poetic language renounces the refinement of most Latin American literature and adopts a more colloquial tone. His first collection, Poemas y Antipoemas (1954) is a classic of Latin American literature, one of the most influential Spanish poetry collections of the twentieth century. It is cited as an inspiration by American Beat writers such as Allen Ginsberg. On December 1, 2011, Parra won the Spanish Ministry of Culture's Cervantes Prize, the most important literary prize in the Spanish-speaking world. On June 7, 2012, he won the Premio Iberoamericano de Poesía Pablo Neruda.

 

 

 

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  • Satan is a Woman by Gil Brewer

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Jun 5, 2014 | 17:17 pm

    Satan is a Woman by Gil Brewer Satan is a Woman by Gil Brewer. New York. 1951. Facwett Gold Medal. paperback. 158 pages. September 1951. #169.    FROM THE PUBLISHER -        She carried hell in her heart. SATAN IS A WOMAN. There is a legend of olden time that the Devil is not a fallen archangle at all, but a woman with flaxen hair and green eyes - a beautiful creature with an angel face, who can bend innocent young men to her will,[…]

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  • Half-Truths & One-And-A-Half Truths by Karl Kraus

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Jun 3, 2014 | 17:16 pm

    Half-Truths & One-And-A-Half Truths by Karl Kraus Half-Truths & One-And-A-Half Truths by Karl Kraus. Montreal. 1976. Engendra Press. hardcover. 128 pages. Design by Anthony Crouch. Edited and translated from the German by Harry Zohn. 0919830005.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        ‘This, and only this, is the substance of our civilization: the speed with which stupidity sucks us into its vortex.’ An intrepid guardian of the truth in an age drowning in lies, Karl Kraus (1874-1936), the great Viennese editor, moralist, polemicist and pacifist -[…]

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  • (04/30/2014) Eurocentrism by Samir Amin

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks May 1, 2014 | 00:51 am

    (04/30/2014) Eurocentrism by Samir Amin Eurocentrism by Samir Amin. New York. 1989. Monthly Review Press. hardcover. 152 pages. Translated from the French by Russell More. 0853457867.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        Since its first publication twenty years ago, Eurocentrism has become a classic of radical thought. Written by one of the world's foremost political economists, this original and provocative essay takes on one of the great 'ideological deformations' of our time: Eurocentrism. Rejecting the dominant Eurocentric view of world history, which narrowly[…]

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  • The Shooting Gallery & Other Stories by Yuko Tsushima

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Apr 30, 2014 | 00:50 am

    The Shooting Gallery & Other Stories by Yuko Tsushima  The Shooting Gallery & Other Stories by Yuko Tsushima. New York. 1988. Pantheon Books. paperback. 138 pages. Translated from the Japanese by Geraldine Harcourt. 0394757432.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        Eight stories by one of Japan's most important women authors concern the struggles of women in a repressive society. An unwed mother introduces her children to their father. A woman confronts the 'other woman'. A young single mother resents her children. These stories touch on universal themes[…]

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  • The Bureaucrats by Honore de Balzac

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Mar 17, 2014 | 16:57 pm

    The Bureaucrats by Honore de Balzac The Bureaucrats by Honore de Balzac. Evanston. 1993. Northwestern University Press. 247 pages. paperback. Cover: Honore Daumier, ‘Le ventre Legiuslatif, from Association Mensuelle.’ Translated from the French by Charles Foulkes. Edited and with an introduction by Marco Diani. 0810109875. Originally published as Les Employés (1837 - Scènes de la vie Parisienne).     FROM THE PUBLISHER -        THE BUREAUCRATS (Les Employés) stands out in Balzac’s immense oeuvre by offering a compelling analysis of an important nineteenth-century French[…]

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  • The Traces Of Thomas Hariot by Muriel Rukeyser

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Mar 5, 2014 | 17:53 pm

    The Traces Of Thomas Hariot by Muriel Rukeyser The Traces Of Thomas Hariot by Muriel Rukeyser. New York. 1971. Random House. 366 pages. hardcover. 0394449231.      FROM THE PUBLISHER -        A study of the life of little-known Elizabethan Thomas Hariot - friend of Ralegh, Drake and Marlowe, and one of the first English explorers of the New World. Hariot was linked to poets, mathematicians and pioneer scientists, involved in the scientific, political, philosophical and sexual heresies of his time, and an expert in ships[…]

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  • Sally Hemings by Barbara Chase-Riboud

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Feb 24, 2014 | 06:24 am

    Sally Hemings by Barbara Chase-Riboud Sally Hemings by Barbara Chase-Riboud. New York. 1979. Viking Press. hardcover. 348 pages. June 1979.  Jacket painting by Cornelia Gray. 0670616052.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        One of the greatest love stories in American history is also one of the least known, and most controversial. Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States and author of the Declaration of Independence, had a mistress for thirty-eight years, whom he loved and lived with until he died, the beautiful[…]

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  • The Italics Are Mine by Nina Berberova

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Jan 23, 2014 | 23:46 pm

    The Italics Are Mine by Nina Berberova The Italics Are Mine by Nina Berberova. New York. 1969. Harcourt Brace & World. 606 pages. hardcover. Jacket photograph & design by Robert A. Propper. Translated from the Russian by Philippe Radley.    FROM THE PUBLISHER -        This is the autobiography of Nina Berberova, who was born in St Petersburg in 1901, the only child of an Armenian father and a North Russian mother. After the Revolution, and the persecution of intellectuals which followed, she was forced[…]

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  • The Republic Of Dreams by Nelida Pinon

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Jan 19, 2014 | 23:45 pm

    The Republic Of Dreams by Nelida Pinon The Republic Of Dreams by Nelida Pinon. New York. 1989. Knopf. 663 pages. July 1989. hardcover. 0394555252. Jacket illustration by Steven Rydberg. Jacket design by Carol Devine Carson. Translated from the Portuguese by Helen Lane. (original title: Republica dos sonhos, 1984 - Livraria Francisco Alves Editora S/A, Rio de Janeiro).   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        This huge, mesmeric novel marks the debut in English of one of the most brilliant and admired of today’s Latin American writers.[…]

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  • Tales of the German Imagination: From the Brothers Grimm to Ingeborg Bachmann by Peter Wortsman (editor)

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Dec 2, 2013 | 15:58 pm

    Tales of the German Imagination: From the Brothers Grimm to Ingeborg Bachmann by Peter Wortsman (editor) Tales of the German Imagination: From the Brothers Grimm to Ingeborg Bachmann by Peter Wortsman (editor). New York. 2012. Penguin Books. paperback. 361 pages. Cover: 'Melancholy of the Mountains', 1929, Coloured woodcut by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner. Translated from the German, selected and editied with an introduction by Peter Wortsman. 9780141198804.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        Bringing together tales of melancholy and madness, nightmare and fantasy, this is a new collection of the most haunting German stories from[…]

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  • The Real Life Of Sebastian Knight by Vladimir Nabokov

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Sep 2, 2013 | 15:10 pm

    The Real Life Of Sebastian Knight by Vladimir Nabokov The Real Life Of Sebastian Knight by Vladimir Nabokov. Norfolk. 1941. 206 pages. November 1941. hardcover.     FROM THE PUBLISHER -    THE REAL LIFE OF SEBASTIAN KNIGHT is a perversely magical literary detective story-subtle, intricate, leading to a tantalizing climax-about the mysterious life of a famous writer. Many people knew things about Sebastian Knight as a distinguished novelist, but probably fewer than a dozen knew of the two love affairs that so profoundly influenced his career, the second[…]

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  • Conversation In The Cathedral by Mario Vargas Llosa

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Jul 10, 2013 | 16:54 pm

    Conversation In The Cathedral by Mario Vargas Llosa Conversation In The Cathedral by Mario Vargas Llosa. New York. 1984. Harper & Row. 601 pages. hardcover. 0060145021. (original title: Conversacion en La Catedral).   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        A powerful novel of political and personal greed, corruption, and terror set in modem Peru, by the author of The Green House and THE TIME OF THE HERO. Under the rule of the unseen military dictator General Odria. suspicion, paranoia, and blackmail become the realities of public and[…]

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  • The Orwell Reader by George Orwell

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Jun 28, 2013 | 16:39 pm

    The Orwell Reader by George Orwell The Orwell Reader by George Orwell. New York. 1956. Harcourt Brace & Company. 456 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Janet Halverson.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        Here is Orwell’s work in all its remarkable range and variety. The selections in this anthology show how Orwell developed as writer and as thinker; inevitably, too, they reflect and illuminate the history of the time of troubles in which he lived and worked. ‘A magnificent tribute to the probity, consistency[…]

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  • Mule Bone: A Comedy Of Negro Life by Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Jun 19, 2013 | 16:35 pm

    Mule Bone: A Comedy Of Negro Life by Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston Mule Bone: A Comedy Of Negro Life by Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston. New York. 1991. Harper Collins. 282 pages. hardcover. 0060553014. Jacket design by Suzanne Noli. Jacket illustration by David Diaz.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        Set in Eatonville, Florida, Zora Neale Hurston’s hometown and the inspiration for much of her fiction, this energetic and often farcical play centers on Jim and Dave, a two-man song-and-dance team, and Daisy, the woman who comes between their[…]

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  • Mansfield Park by Jane Austen

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Apr 12, 2013 | 14:55 pm

    Mansfield Park by Jane Austen Mansfield Park by Jane Austen. New York. 1996. Penguin Books. 432 pages. paperback. 0140434143. The cover shows ‘Miss Cazenove mounted on a Grey Hunter’ by Jacques-Laurent Agasse. Edited and with an introduction by Kathryn Sutherland.    FROM THE PUBLISHER -        MANSFIELD PARK is Jane Austen’s most profound and perplexing novel. Adopted into the household of her uncle, Sir Thomas Bertram, Fanny Price grows up a meek outsider among her cousins in the unaccustomed elegance of Mansfield Park.[…]

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  • Eva's Man by Gayl Jones

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Mar 1, 2013 | 20:27 pm

    Eva's Man by Gayl Jones Eva's Man by Gayl Jones. New York. 1976. Random House. 179 pages. March 1976. hardcover. 0394499344. Jacket design and illustration by Wendell Minor.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        Sitting in a prison cell—talking to a cellmate, a psychiatrist, herself, us - Eva Medina Canada is trying to remember it all, to keep memory separate from fantasy. But it is not easy. For a woman with no man and no money has to live in the streets, and[…]

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  • Corregidora by Gayl Jones

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Feb 28, 2013 | 20:23 pm

    Corregidora by Gayl Jones Corregidora by Gayl Jones. New York. 1975. Random House. 186 pages. March 1975. hardcover. 0394493230. Jacket design by Wendell Minor.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        Ursa Corregidora is lucky. She can sing her terror and her longing in a Kentucky café. She is less helpless then, and less bedeviled. But there is no song to numb her - to help her forget that the fruits of her marriage were violence and sterility; that she cannot live up[…]

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  • The Price Of The Ticket: Collected Nonfiction 1948-1985 by James Baldwin

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Feb 26, 2013 | 20:23 pm

    The Price Of The Ticket: Collected Nonfiction 1948-1985 by James Baldwin The Price Of The Ticket: Collected Nonfiction 1948-1985 by James Baldwin. New York. 1985. St Martin's Press. 690 pages. hardcover. 0312643063. Jacket design by Andy Carpenter.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        James Baldwin is one of the major American voices of this century. Nowhere is this more evident than in THE PRICE OF THE TICKET, which includes virtually every important piece of nonfiction, short and long, that Mr. Baldwin has ever written. With total truth and profound[…]

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  • Oriental Tales by Marguerite Yourcenar

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Jan 14, 2013 | 21:39 pm

    Oriental Tales by Marguerite Yourcenar Oriental Tales by Marguerite Yourcenar. New York. 1985. Farrar Straus Giroux. 147 pages. hardcover. 0374227284. Jacket painting by Tao-chi (1641-ca. 1710), from ‘Returning Home.’ Jacket design by Cynthia Krupat.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        Legends caught in flight, fables, allegories - these ten ORIENTAL TALES form a singular edifice in the work of Marguerite Yourcenar, as precious as a chapel in a vast palace. From China to Greece, from the Balkans to Japan, these TALES take us[…]

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  • Harmless Poisons, Blameless Sins by Mohammed Mrabet

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Dec 30, 2012 | 22:41 pm

    Harmless Poisons, Blameless Sins by Mohammed Mrabet Harmless Poisons, Blameless Sins by Mohammed Mrabet. Santa Barbara. 1976. Black Sparrow Press. Taped and Translated from the Moghrebi by Paul Bowles. 105 pages. 0876852746.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        During his childhood Mrabet listened to traditional story tellers in Tangier´s cafés - a world that fascinated him. Later on he would invent his own stories, and Paul Bowles taped and transcribed his stories. Mrabet´s first novel Love with a Few Hairs was published 1967 in London[…]

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  • Ancestor Stones by Aminatta Forna

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Dec 23, 2012 | 22:39 pm

    Ancestor Stones by Aminatta Forna Ancestor Stones by Aminatta Forna. New York. 2006. Atlantic Monthly Press. 323 pages. Jacket art by Bruno Barbier/Robert Harding. 0871139448. September 2006.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        ‘Abie has followed the arc of a letter from London back to Africa, to the coffee groves of Kholifa Estates, the plantation formerly owned by her grandfather. It is a place she remembers from childhood and which now belongs to her - if she wants it. Standing among the ruined[…]

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  • Dr.Futurity by Philip K. Dick

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Nov 3, 2012 | 04:54 am

    Dr.Futurity by Philip K. Dick Dr. Futurity by Philip K. Dick. New York. 1960. Ace Books. Paperback Original. Bound As An Ace Double With SLAVERS OF SPACE by John Brunner. D-421. 138 pages.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -         DR. FUTURITY is a 1960 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. It is an expansion of his earlier short story ‘Time Pawn‘, which first saw publication in the summer 1954 issue of Thrilling Wonder Stories. DR. FUTURITY was first published as a[…]

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  • The Collected Works Of Jane Bowles by Jane Bowles

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Oct 25, 2012 | 19:55 pm

    The Collected Works Of Jane Bowles by Jane Bowles The Collected Works Of Jane Bowles by Jane Bowles. New York. 1966. Farrar Straus Giroux. Introduction by Truman Capote. 431 pages. Jacket design by Ronald Clyne.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        Jane Bowles has for many years had an underground reputation as one of the truly original writers of the twentieth century. This collection of expertly crafted short fiction will fully acquaint all students and scholars with the author Tennessee Williams called the most important writer of[…]

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  • How To Solve It by G. Polya

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Dec 31, 2011 | 01:37 am

    How To Solve It by G. Polya How To Solve It by G. Polya. Garden City. 1957. Anchor/Doubleday. A93. 253 pages. Cover by George Giusti.Typography By Edward Gorey.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -         Heuristic - the study of the methods and rules of discovery and invention - has until our time been a largely neglected, almost forgotten, branch of learning. The disputed province of logic or philosophy or psychology, it tries to understand the process of solving problems and its typical mental operations.[…]

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  • Country Place by Ann Petry

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Nov 21, 2011 | 03:26 am

    Country Place by Ann Petry Country Place by Ann Petry. Boston. 1947. Houghton Mifflin. 266 pages. Cover: Paul Sample.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -     With all the compassionate insight into human beings for which she is noted, Ann Petry exposes the hypocrisies of a tranquil New England town in this dramatic story of a war veteran who searches to find out whether his wife has been unfaithful. ‘Gossip, malice, infidelity, murder. . . are some of the dominant matters treated in Country Place.’[…]

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  • The Unconscious Civilization by John Ralston Saul

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Nov 21, 2011 | 03:23 am

    The Unconscious Civilization by John Ralston Saul The Unconscious Civilization by John Ralston Saul. New York. 1997. Free Press. 199 pages. Jacket design by Tom Stvan. Jacket photograph by Philip Wallick/PPD International. Author photograph by Beverley Rockett. 0684832577. January 1997.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        Civilizations, like individuals, are often blinded to their true character by sentiment and ideology - and ours is perhaps the most glaring example. In a powerful meditation already hailed as ‘the best work of popular philosophizing produced in this[…]

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  • The Narrows by Ann Petry

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Nov 21, 2011 | 03:21 am

    The Narrows by Ann Petry The Narrows by Ann Petry. Boston. 1953. Houghton Mifflin. 428 pages.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        Originally published in 1953, The Narrows spins the unforgettable tale of a forbidden love affair between Link Williams, a college-educated twenty-six-year-old black man, and Camilo Sheffield, a wealthy married white woman. Set in the sleepy New England town of Monmouth, Connecticut, and 'filled with dramatic force, earthy humor, and tragic intensity', this classic novel deftly evokes a divisive era in America's[…]

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  • Black Reconstruction in America 1860-1880 by W. E. B. Du Bois

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Nov 21, 2011 | 02:22 am

    Black Reconstruction in America 1860-1880 by W. E. B. Du Bois Black Reconstruction in America 1860-1880 by W. E. B. Du Bois. New York. 1938. Harcourt Brace & Company. 746 pages. March 1938.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -      A distinguished scholar introduces the pioneering work in the study of the role of black Americans during the Reconstruction by the most gifted and influential black intellectual of his time. BLACK RECONSTRUCTION IN AMERICA is a book by W. E. B. Du Bois, first published in 1935. It is revisionist approach[…]

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  • Incantations & Other Stories by Anjana Appachana

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Nov 21, 2011 | 02:11 am

    Incantations & Other Stories by Anjana Appachana Incantations & Other Stories by Anjana Appachana. New Brunswick. 1992. Rutgers University Press. 150 pages. Cover photograph by Kasha Dalal. Cover design by the Senate. 0813518288.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        This first collection of fiction by Anjana Appachana provides stories that are beautifully written, the characters in them carefully and respectfully drawn. All the stories are set in India, but the people in them seem somehow displaced within their own society—a society in transition but a[…]

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  • The Street by Ann Petry

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Nov 21, 2011 | 00:20 am

    The Street by Ann Petry  The Street by Ann Petry. Boston. 1946. Houghton Mifflin. A Literary Fellowship Prize 1st Novel. 436 pages.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -      THE STREET tells the poignant, often heartbreaking story of Lutie Johnson, a young black woman, and her spirited struggle to raise her son amid the violence, poverty, and racial dissonance of Harlem in the late 1940s. Originally published in 1946 and hailed by critics as a masterwork, The Street was Ann Petry's first novel, a beloved[…]

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  • Roderick Random by Tobias Smollett

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Nov 20, 2011 | 23:59 pm

    Roderick Random by Tobias Smollett Roderick Random by Tobias Smollett. New York. 1995. Penguin Books. Edited & With An Introduction and Notes By David Blewett. 480 pages. The cover shows a detail of Lord George Graham in His Cabin by William Hogarth in the National Maritime Museum, London. 9780140433326.   RODERICK RANDOM was published in 1748 to immediate acclaim, and established Smollett among the most popular of eighteenth-century novelists. In this picaresque tale, Roderick Random suffers misfortune after misfortune as he drifts from one pummeling to another[…]

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  • Voltaire's Bastards: The Dictatorship Of Reason In The West by John Ralston Saul

    Zenosbooks - Zeno's Picks Nov 20, 2011 | 23:50 pm

    Voltaire's Bastards: The Dictatorship Of Reason In The West by John Ralston Saul Voltaire's Bastards: The Dictatorship Of Reason In The West by John Ralston Saul. New York. 1992. Free Press. 640 pages. Cover design by Michael Langenstein. 0029277256.   The pitfalls of rationalism and and the rise of bureaucracy.   FROM THE PUBLISHER -        In a wide-ranging, provocative anatomy of modern society and its origins, novelist and historian John Ralston Saul explores the reason for our deepening sense of crisis and confusion. Throughout the Western world we talk endlessly[…]

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Words Without Borders

New York Review of Books

  • Night Terrors

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    Night Terrors If, like me, you’re a baby boomer who pleaded as a child to stay up with the big kids to watch The Twilight Zone, you might remember daring yourself to make it all the way through without taking cover behind[…]

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  • Grand Illusions

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    Grand Illusions In Radical Hope: Ethics in the Face of Cultural Devastation (2006), Jonathan Lear writes of the intellectual trauma of the Crow Indians. Forced to move in the mid-nineteenth century from a nomadic to a settled existence, they catastrophically lost not[…]

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  • The Revival of Church Sanctuary

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    The Revival of Church Sanctuary Midway through last year, half a dozen Latin American immigrants scattered across the United States received “notices of intent to fine” from US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) for failing to leave the country. ICE has long had the authority[…]

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  • Where Health Care Is a Human Right

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    Where Health Care Is a Human Right In 2004 the CBC—Canada’s publicly funded broadcaster—produced a TV competition called The Greatest Canadian, which sought to crown a national figure, living or dead, with the title. (The BBC had produced a similar program in the UK two years earlier.)[…]

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  • Things as They Are

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    Things as They Are In 1966 the Museum of Modern Art held a retrospective devoted to Dorothea Lange—its first-ever solo exhibition of work by a female photographer. Lange’s photographs have now become part of our collective memory of the Great Depression. Migrant Mother (1936)—a[…]

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  • An Incandescent Inanity

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    An Incandescent Inanity Nikolai Gogol (1809–1852), Russia’s greatest comic writer, thoroughly baffled his contemporaries. Strange, peculiar, wacky, weird, bizarre, and other words indicating enigmatic oddity recur in descriptions of him. “What an intelligent, queer, and sick creature!” remarked Turgenev; another major prose writer,[…]

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  • Learning to Grieve

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    Learning to Grieve “Maybe I didn’t die properly,” says Jamie (played by Alan Rickman) in Anthony Minghella’s early film Truly, Madly, Deeply. “Maybe that’s why I can come back.” His partner, Nina (Juliet Stevenson), has been driven mad with grief, following his sudden[…]

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  • China’s Clampdown on Hong Kong

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    China’s Clampdown on Hong Kong As the 1997 handover of Hong Kong from Britain to China approached, commentary in the English-language press about the future of the colony was written in the elegiac style of obituaries, extolling the past and lamenting the future. In June[…]

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  • Query

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    I am writing the biography of Morton Sobell, and would like to hear from anyone who knew him. David Evanier 917-671-7612 devanier@earthlink.net

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  • The Representative

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    The Representative After the election of 2018, the US Congress became the most racially and ethnically diverse it had ever been. The freshman class contained a record number of incoming women (thirty-six), including the four young progressives who came to be called[…]

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  • Measuring Slavery’s Impact

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    To the Editors: Fara Dabhoiwala in “Speech and Slavery in the West Indies” [NYR, August 20] makes two claims that cannot be correct. As one of the scholars working on the www .slavevoyages.org site, which he kindly references, I would[…]

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  • Boston

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    When I first moved to this city to take a job, and the snows began to fall, a slow sadness took hold of me. Someone left a tiny pencil drawing of a sailboat on the ceiling of my bedroom, and[…]

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  • Seeing Too Clearly

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    Seeing Too Clearly Not long ago, Hari Kunzru was asked in an interview, “What is the worst-case scenario for the future?” He answered with brutal lucidity: The US becomes an autocracy, and devolves into a weak and fractious patchwork of jurisdictions run by[…]

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  • Max Weber’s Agon

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    To the Editors: We appreciate Peter E. Gordon’s thoughtful review of Charisma and Disenchantment, our edition of Max Weber’s “vocation lectures” [NYR, June 11], but of course we’re not writing simply to say thank you. For all the care and[…]

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  • Rashly Filling the Void

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    In an essay about his landmark novel, Native Son, Richard Wright argued that while the racial identity of his protagonist was essential to the storyline, it was not exclusively tied to the book’s broader meaning. True, Bigger Thomas—that brooding, brutal,[…]

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  • Don’t Wish for a Restoration

    The New York Review of Books Oct 29, 2020 | 12:00 pm

    During the last few years—and increasingly during the last few months—Americans have more and more come to resemble the passengers on the steamboat Fidèle in Herman Melville’s The Confidence Man. A sign hanging from the barbershop bulkhead says “No Trust.”[…]

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