Zenosbooks

Finding Time Again: In Search of Lost Time by Marcel Proust. London. 2003. Penguin Books. Newly Translated from the French by Ian Patterson. 374 pages. paperback. 9780141180366.

 

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

 

   In Finding Time Again, Marcel discovers his world destroyed by war and those he knew transformed by the march of time. A superb picture of France in the throes of the First World War, and containing, in the Bal des tetes sequence, one of Proust’s most devastating set-pieces, Finding Time Again triumphantly describes the paradox of facing mortality yet overcoming it through the act of writing. As Marcel rediscovers his vocation, he realizes that he can live on by writing down the story of his own memories and of his search to recapture the past. ‘One of the cornerstones of the Western literary canon’ - The Times.

 

 MARCEL PROUST was born in Auteuil in 1871. In his twenties, following a year in the army, he became a conspicuous society figure, frequenting the most fashionable Paris salons of the day. After 1899, however, his chronic asthma, the death of his parents, and his growing disillusionment with humanity caused him to lead an increasingly retired life. From 1907 on, he rarely emerged from a cork-lined room in his apartment on boulevard Haussmann. There he insulated himself against the distractions of city life and the effects of trees and flowers-though he loved them, they brought on his attacks of asthma. He slept by day and worked by night, writing letters and devoting himself to the completion of In Search of Lost Time. He died in 1922.

 

 

 Check zenosbooks.com for either a used or a new copy of this book, or you can add it to your wishlist.

 

 

 

 


Search

Zeno's Picks

New York Review of Books

The New York Review of Books

Recent items from nybooks.com
  • A Sketched Guide to Michelangelo
    There are three extremely horny artists with exhibits at the Met right now. Rodin (a last name artist), David Hockney (arguably a full name artist), and Michelangelo (a first name artist). It's fun to watch people look at the work with extremely...
  • Rulfo: Immortal Scribe of the Dead
    Against the grain of the baroque, overwrought style that had seemed to define Latin American literature, each word of Juan Rulfo’s fiction emerges as if extracted from the soil, leaving readers to apprehend what is held back, to divine the vast...
  • In the Cauldron at Midnight
    Can a woman be a muse and an artist? In theory, yes. In practice, the roles seldom overlap comfortably. “All that means is you’re someone else’s object,” as Leonora Carrington put it.
  • A Modern Greek Tragedy
    Did Greece have any way of breaking out of Germany’s grip? The common criticism of Yanis Varoufakis’s period in office is that he was an intellectual who took the knife of logic to a political gunfight. He was ill equipped from the start. His...
  • ‘Black Panther’: Choose Your Weapons
    Movies often flatten real African cultures into two-dimensional imagery—stereotypes in stereo, a quilt of clichés. But Wakanda, as everyone keeps reminding us, doesn’t exist. This gave Ryan Coogler free rein to create a country in the subjunctive...
  • Words to Live By
    From the moment of my diagnosis, I pondered the nature of love: Had I left my sons enough of it? Does love endure? Is love bankable? I stumble upon the answer courtesy of an illness that forced me to look back on a childhood marked by loss and...
  • Luther vs. Erasmus: When Populism First Eclipsed the Liberal Elite
    Erasmus was an internationalist who sought to establish a borderless Christian union; Luther was a nationalist who appealed to the patriotism of the German people. Where Erasmus wrote exclusively in Latin, Luther often used the vernacular, the...
  • Congo for the Congolese
    Beneath Congo’s soil lies an estimated $24 trillion in natural resources, but this wealth is also the source of untold suffering. Today, more Congolese are displaced from their homes than Syrians, Iraqis, Yemenis, or Rohingyas, yet their miseries...
  • Roth Agonistes
    During his early writing years in Chicago, Philip Roth began each morning by shouting at the young face peering out from the mirror at him: “Attack! Attack!” The force of Roth’s attack, sustained for more than a half-century, is what made his...

Neglectedbooks.com

The Neglected Books Page

www.NeglectedBooks.com: Where forgotten books are remembered
  • If Hopes Were Dupes, by Catherine York (Pseudonym of Ann Farrer) (1966)
    Reading Jessica Mitford’s memoir of the critic, novelist, and poet Philip Toynbee, The Faces of Philip (1984), I stumbled across a mention of a book that turns out not only to be neglected but (at the moment) unattainable outside a couple dozen libraries: Ann Farrer’s 1966 memoir of her struggles with depression and the relatively... Read...
  • Lord, I Was Afraid, by Nigel Balchin (1947)
    I have a mild fascination with unreadable books. Mild because I often lack the courage or persistence to take them on, fascination because I often have the nagging sense that I should. By “unreadable,” I don’t mean truly unreadable, like the book of Pi to the millionth digit or whatever length it is, but dauntingly... Read more
  • Fido Couchant, by P. B. Abercrombie (1961)
    I’ve reached the point where I’m no longer surprised to find that even after decades of looking for neglected books, I can still stumble across completely unfamiliar books and authors. A perfect example is P. B. (short for Patricia Barnes) Abercrombie, who wrote about eight novels, most of them comedies, between the early 1950s and... Read more
  • The Rat, by G. M. A. Hewett (1904)
    It’s something of a guilty pleasure to come across a children’s book that doesn’t exactly seem to have been written with children in mind. Take The Rat, by G. M. A. (George Mottram Arthur) Hewett, the first in a series of “Animal Autobiographies” published by Adam and Charles Black in the early 1900s. I give... Read more
  • “Death at Teatime,” by K. Arnold Price, from Little Reviews Anthology 1945
    Death at Teatime That afternoon when everything stopped at four o’clock the houses suddenly looked old as fossils cold in the rigid sunlight transfixed from prehistoric time. Sound raved up in spate from College Green, released from utterance for there was now no more to be said: released from laughter for there would be no... Read more
  • Kenneth Fearing, Poet
    If poetry didn’t have a bad rap in the eyes of American readers and publishers, the poems of Kenneth Fearing would never go out of print. They’d be shelved alongside the crime novels of Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler and read just as often. One of his novels–The Big Clock (1946)–has attained that status. It’s... Read more
  • Obituaries, by William Saroyan (1979)
    When he was a young man with aspirations to become a writer, William Saroyan set himself a daily task to write for at least an hour and produce at least a few pages, no matter how good, bad, or irrelevant the results. It established a discipline that served him well for over fifty years, helping... Read more
  • “Lament,” by Brenda Chamberlain, from The New British Poets
    Lament My man is a bone ringed with weed. Thus it was on my bridal night, That the sea, risen to a green wall At our window, quenching love’s new delight, Stood curved between me and the midnight call Of him who said I was so fair He could drown for joy in the salt... Read more
  • Free E-books of Dorothy Richardson’s Pilgrimage — and a technical note
    Almost two years ago, I embarked upon my most ambitious and, it turned out, most rewarding reading task, working through the thirteen books of Dorothy Richardson’s Pilgrimage. (Richardson referred to it as a single novel and each book as a chapter.) At the time I wrote: … while a complete scholarly edition of Richardson’s work......
  • The Collected Stories of Rhys Davies (1955)
    We spent our Christmas week in a cottage in north Wales and I could not pass the time without taking the opportunity to read a long out-of-print collection of stories by one of Wales’ finest writers of the 20th century, Rhys Davies. The Collected Stories of Rhys Davies is one of the many perhaps not... Read more

Subscribe to our Newsletter!

Receive
Copyright © 2018 Zenosbooks. All Rights Reserved.
Joomla! is Free Software released under the GNU General Public License.