short account of greek philosophy perennial p138A Short Account of Greek Philosophy by G. F. Parker. New York. 1969. Harper Perennial. P138. 194 pages. Cover design by Ted Bernstein.

A readable summary of Greek philosophy.


   ‘Each year sees an increased number of students entering the upper forms of our schools, our colleges and our universities. Most are not only studying some subject or subjects in depth but are also following a course of General or Liberal Studies. Many have no first-hand or formal acquaintance with Classical thought and are constantly meeting references to Greek philosophers and common philosophical terms. They are also discovering that, however important and interesting their particular subjects, there is a great deal of truth in the words of Sir Karl Popper: ‘We are not students of some subject matter but students of problems. And problems cut right across the borders of any subject matter or discipline. ’ The history of man’s thought recognizes no arbitrarily erected barriers. There are, too, the ‘students’ who are not formally enrolled in any educational establishment and who are traveling each year to Greece in unprecedented numbers to explore at first hand the more palpable remains of Classical and pre-Classical ages. Excellent guide books for the traveler are already numerous and continue to multiply. But however good the guide books, one cannot easily capture the spirit o, say, Heracleitus or Democritus or Plato as one wanders round an ancient temple site or modern museum. It has been my intention to provide information and some common ground for students, whatever their subjects of study or interests may be. Plato and Aristotle cannot be ignored; nor can they be understood except in relation to their times and their predecessors, the pre-Socratic philosophers. And the pre-Socratics are not merely important; they are intellectually exciting and have a certain affinity with our present age. ' – From the Preface by the author.



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