Zenosbooks

(02/25/2013) Faith & The Good Thing by Charles Johnson. New York. 1974. Viking Press. 196 pages. hardcover. keywords: Literature America Black African American. 0670305693. Jacket design by Abner Graboff.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   ‘It is time to tell you of Faith and the Good Thing.’ Faith Cross, only child of Lavidia and the late Todd Cross (a storyteller who lived in a world full of magic and fabulous fictions) of Hatten County, Georgia, saved at a prayer meeting at the age of twelve, is a beauty, a brown-sugared soul sister turning eighteen on the day her mother breathes her last breath. ‘Momma,’ Faith says, ‘I called for Reverend Brown. .’ Lavidia says, ‘Girl, you get yourself a good thing,’ then gulps once and dies. Faith doesn’t know what that means, but she hungers to find out. She wants – needs - that Good Thing on earth, that really Good Thing. Can anyone show her the way? The Swamp Woman, the werewitch who dwells in the bogs, tells her she’s a Number One - needs direction to avoid disaster. Faith, she says, should leave the Southern backwoods and head for Chicago. Life on earth without the Good Thing, she tells Faith, is marked by famine and misery. It is not much to go on, but it propels sweet Faith Cross away from her rural Dixie and her lost love Alpha Omega Holmes to the lower depths of the Windy City, and from a soulless middle-class existence to the interior of her memories and her hopes. Here, in this quest for the Good Thing, we have the human adventure. We also have the story of Faith Cross - a metaphysical yarn spun from pure feeling; from sex, love, suffering, beauty, and truth. Set to the music of the spheres, haunted by a philosopher’s spirit, conjured up from dreams and disasters, the adventure-strewn path to Faith’s Good Thing lies before us and powerfully beckons us to follow. Trust Charles Johnson, a storyteller with a sorcerer’s touch, to realize the moment of truth. In this remarkable, relentlessly fascinating first novel, he blends superstition, folk tale, and sharply edged realism to bring us closer to that Good Thing than perhaps even he will ever know.

CHARLES JOHNSON received the National Book Award for MIDDLE PASSAGE in 1990. Currently the Pollock Professor of English at the University of Washington, he lives in Seattle.

 


Check zenosbooks.com for either a used or a new copy of this book, or you can add it to your wishlist.

 


 

 

 

 

 


Search

Who's Online

We have 174 guests and no members online

Zeno's Picks

Democracy Now!

Democracy Now!

Democracy Now! is an independent daily TV & radio news program, hosted by award-winning journalists Amy Goodman and Juan González. We provide daily global news headlines, in-depth interviews and investigative reports without any advertisements or government funding. Our programming shines a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lifts up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. Democracy Now! is live weekdays at 8am ET and available 24/7 through our website and podcasts.

Words Without Borders

Words Without Borders

Words Without Borders:The Online Magazine of International Literature

New York Review of Books

The New York Review of Books

Recent items from nybooks.com
  • The New Passport-Poor
    Drawing borders around people might give us a more orderly and predictable world. But for all the promised benefits of a frictionless experience of journeying, it may not be a more humane one. Passports might disappear in the next decade, but...
  • The Afro-Pessimist Temptation
    Ta-Nehisi Coates says that he came to understand as a grown-up the limits of anger, but he is in a fed-up, secessionist mood by the end of We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy. His collection of eight essays on politics and...
  • Ratfucked Again
    The party that wins the right to draw the legislative maps of the 2020s will have enormous power to shape future Congresses and state legislatures—to determine, for example, whether districts are drawn in such a way that Republicans need only worry...
  • Remodeling Mayhem
    “Counter Investigations,” an exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London, details the work of an investigative agency called Forensic Architecture. The group, founded by the Israeli architect Eyal Weizman in 2010, seeks to use...
  • Devastatingly Human
    The gripping and dramatic show “All Too Human: Bacon, Freud and a Century of Painting Life” merits its title: it is “all too human” in the tender, painful works that form its core. But “a century of painting life” promises something wider—does it...
  • Epigenetics: The Evolution Revolution
    It is by now well established that people who suffer trauma directly during childhood or who experience their mother’s trauma indirectly as a fetus may have epigenetically based illnesses as adults. More controversial is whether epigenetic changes...
  • Malaysia and the Improbable Win of an Unlikely Alliance
    Mahathir Mohamad’s campaign promise was to obtain a pardon from prison for Anwar Ibrahim, the former deputy whom he, Mahathir, had once seen jailed, if his electoral alliance with Anwar’s wife won in this month’s general election. This...
  • The New Europeans
    Europe has become more anti-Muslim as it has become more Muslim. Though it is hard to find many cultural affinities between the Pakistanis of Bradford, the Algerians of Marseille, and the Turks of Berlin, Islam remains the main determinant of...
  • The Old Lady
    The Bank of England is one of Britain’s distinct contributions to history. It was chartered in 1694 to lend money to King William for war on France, when a company of London merchants received from Parliament the right to take deposits in coin from...

Neglectedbooks.com

The Neglected Books Page

www.NeglectedBooks.com: Where forgotten books are remembered
  • Of Princesses and their Memoirs
    Just in case the newest addition to the British Royal Family, the Duchess of Sussex, is in need of some self-help reading, here is a tiara-full of memoirs written by princesses from the past. • The beautiful Lady Craven; the original memoirs of Elizabeth, baroness Craven, afterwards margravine of Anspach and Bayreuth and princess Berkeley... Read more
  • John Quill, from Weeds of Witchery, by Thomas Haynes Bayly (1837)
    John Quill John Quill was clerk to Robert Shark, a legal man was he, As dull, obscure, and technical as legal man could be; And, perch’d before his legal desk, Quill learnt the legal rules That give high principles to all who sit upon high stools! John Quill with skill could doubt distil where all... Read more
  • George Arbuthnott Jarrett, by Bernard Toms (1965)
    George Arbuthnott Jarrett was one of the most striking debuts in English fiction in the 1960s. There was nothing in Bernard Toms’ background to suggest that this ex-RAF mechanic and former Metropolitan Police officer had a work of such intensity and originality in him. As Irving Wardle, the TLS reviewer wrote: Originality is the last... Read more
  • “The Vote,” by Ralph Knevet from Another World Than This (1657)
    The Vote The helmet now an hive for bees becomes, And hilts of swords may serve for spiders’ looms;    Sharp pikes may make    Teeth for a rake; And the keen blade, th’ arch enemy of life. Shall be degraded to a pruning knife.    The rustic spade    Which first was made For honest agriculture, shall retake......
  • Where Love and Friendship Dwelt, by Marie Belloc Lowndes (1943)
    Where Love and Friendship Dwelt, the second volume of Marie Belloc Lowndes’ memoirs, covers a period of just over ten years, but it is a nearly non-stop parade of personalities. Most of them come from French literature, art, and theatre, for Belloc Lowndes spent much of this time writing notes from Paris for a variety... Read more
  • Tea, from And So Did I, by Malachi Whitaker (1939)
    Wine costs so much a bottle, ready made. When you have once got over the effort of hospitality (if it is an effort) there is nothing to do but open the bottle and wait. But tea is different, especially tea among the poor. Sometimes it is an effort in itself to go and draw the... Read more
  • And So Did I, by Malachi Whitaker (1939)
    If And So Did I were to be published afresh today as the work of a woman in her late thirties with a number of well-received short story collections behind her, I have no doubt that it would be quite successful in its sales and critical reception. Thanks to Wild, Eat, Pray, Love, The Argonauts,... Read more
  • No Stars on Travelocity, from Arthur Young’s travels in France
    At St. Geronde: go to the Croix Blanche, the most execrable receptacle of filth, vermin, impudence, and imposition that ever exercised the patience, or wounded the feelings of a traveller. A withered hag, the daemon of beastliness, presides there. I laid, not rested, in a chamber over a stable, whose effluviae through the broken floor... Read more
  • Blood and Water, by Peter de Polnay (1975)
    Every year or so, I reach for one of Georges Simenon’s “straight” novels–those bitter human comedies, such as The Rules of the Game, that he turned out as regularly as his Maigrets, usually spending under two weeks in writing them. As I once wrote, these novels have something of the attractive bitterness of a glass... Read more
  • The Many Names of God … er, Coffee, from All About Coffee, by William H. Ukers (1922)
    Nepenthe Festive cup Juice divine Nectar divine Ruddy mocha A man’s drink Lovable liquor Delicious mocha The magic drink This rich cordial Its stream divine The family drink The festive drink Coffee is our gold Nectar of all men The golden mocha This sweet nectar Celestial ambrosia The friendly drink The cheerful drink The essential......
Copyright © 2018 Zenosbooks. All Rights Reserved.
Joomla! is Free Software released under the GNU General Public License.