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Author birthdays

  • January 10th

    January 10th Americo De Almeida, Jose (Born  January 10, 1887)    JOSE AMERICO DE ALMEIDA was born in 1887 and lived in retirement in Joao Pessoa. His long life was devoted almost entirely to public service and literature. His first novel A Bagacei’ra (Trash, 1928) enjoyed enormous success. The first translation of the book to appear in any language was that of R. L. Scott-Buccleuch into English in 1978 and...

  • January 9th

    January 9th   Karel Capek (Born  January 9, 1890)    Karel Capek (January 9, 1890 - December 25, 1938) was one of the most influential Czech writers of the 20th century. Capek was born in Malé Svatonovice, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary (now Czech Republic). He wrote with intelligence and humour on a wide variety of subjects. His works are known for their interesting and precise descriptions of reality, and...

  • January 8th

    January 8th     Leonardo Sciascia (Born  January 8, 1921)    Leonardo Sciascia (January 8, 1921 – November 20, 1989) was an Italian writer, novelist, essayist, playwright and politician. Some of his works have been made into films, including Open Doors (1990) and Il giorno della civetta (1968). Sciascia was born in Racalmuto, Sicily. In 1935 his family moved to Caltanissetta; here Sciascia studied under...

Neglectedbooks.com

The Neglected Books Page

www.NeglectedBooks.com: Where forgotten books are remembered
  • Double Exposure, by Gloria Vanderbilt and Thelma Lady Furness (1958)
    You don’t read Double Exposure, the dual-narrated memoir of identical twins and society dames Gloria Morgan Vanderbilt and Thelma Morgan, Lady (later Viscountess) Furness as literature, but as a combination of specimen and spectacle. And as the latter, it offers more nooks and crevices than a Mandelbrot set. For those into abnormal psychology, there is […]
  • Mrs. Beneker, by Violet Weingarten (1967)
    Depending on your perspective, Violet Weingarten’s debut novel, Mrs. Beneker (1967) is outdated or timeless. Mr. and Mrs. Beneker could live next door to half of John Cheever’s characters or across the street from Rob and Laura Petrie. She picks up Mr. Beneker from the 6:23PM train to Westchester, takes an adult education class on […]
  • Cousin to Human, by Jane Mayhall (1960)
    I learned of Jane Mayhall’s first and only novel, Cousin to Human (1960) from its inclusion in Tillie Olsen’s lists of recommended titles by women writers included in the back of her book, Silences. Olsen provided no description of it and no explanation for its mention. Cousin to Human seems to have vanished from notice […]
  • Hunter of Doves, by Josephine Herbst (1954)
    “For understanding what it was like to live to the full the turbulent American literary life of the 1920’s and 30’s as it moved from bohemianism to radicalism, there could be no more revealing figure than Josephine Herbst,” wrote Robert Gorham Davis in his review of Elinor Langer’s 1984 biography of Herbst, Josephine Herbst: The […]
  • Snow in London, from A Half of Two Lives, by Alison Waley
    The Wind Blows High The wind, the wind, the wind blows high, The snow is falling from the sky. Maisie Drummond says she’ll die For Want of the Golden City. Children’s Game The last day of February I929. At Bayswater when I enter the Underground the sky is dull as canvas and still — the […]
  • Risk, by Rachel MacKenzie (1971)
    Risk, Rachel MacKenzie’s brief account of her hospitalization and initial recovery from open-heart surgery to repair an aneurysm of the left ventricle of her heart is one of the shortest books covered on this site, just 59 pages in all. Adapted from an article she published in The New Yorker in November, 1970 as “fiction,” […]
  • “Train Window,” from Sun-Up and Other Poems, by Lola Ridge (1920)
    Train Window Small towns Crawling out of their green shirts … Tubercular towns Coughing a little in the dawn … And the church … There is always a church With its natty spire And the vestibule– That’s where they whisper: Tzz-tzz . . . tzz-tzz . . . tzz-tzz . . . How many codes […]
  • Lost Writers of the Plains, from Nebraska Educational Telecommunications
    Link: http://netnebraska.org/basic-page/learning-services/lost-writers-plains A new series of radio shows, along with a free accompanying ebook, featuring the lives and works of eight neglected writers of the American Plains, has just been released by Nebraska Educational Telecommunications. This series, organized by Professor Wendy Katz from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, is a little multimedia treasure trove. For each […]
  • A Half of Two Lives, by Alison Waley (1982)
    First, let’s start with the facts, since these are not this book’s strong suit. Sometime in 1929, Arthur Waley, who was working as Assistant Keeper of Oriental Prints and Manuscripts at the British Museum and who had began to be known as a translator and popularizer of Asian literature with his publication of A Hundred […]
  • Dinner Party at Sea, from Flamingo, by Mary Borden
    The dinner party, thanks to the little pills that Mr. Parkinson always had by him, was a great success. Mr. Parkinson swallowed one, and made Mrs. Prime do the same, saying in his high, funny falsetto voice, “Here you are, Biddy,” and then the cocktail table shot across the floor and he went with it, […]

Three Percent - Literature in Translation

Three Percent - Article

A resource for international literature from the University of Rochester

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(02/25/2013) Faith & The Good Thing by Charles Johnson. New York. 1974. Viking Press. 196 pages. hardcover. keywords: Literature America Black African American. 0670305693. Jacket design by Abner Graboff.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   ‘It is time to tell you of Faith and the Good Thing.’ Faith Cross, only child of Lavidia and the late Todd Cross (a storyteller who lived in a world full of magic and fabulous fictions) of Hatten County, Georgia, saved at a prayer meeting at the age of twelve, is a beauty, a brown-sugared soul sister turning eighteen on the day her mother breathes her last breath. ‘Momma,’ Faith says, ‘I called for Reverend Brown. .’ Lavidia says, ‘Girl, you get yourself a good thing,’ then gulps once and dies. Faith doesn’t know what that means, but she hungers to find out. She wants – needs - that Good Thing on earth, that really Good Thing. Can anyone show her the way? The Swamp Woman, the werewitch who dwells in the bogs, tells her she’s a Number One - needs direction to avoid disaster. Faith, she says, should leave the Southern backwoods and head for Chicago. Life on earth without the Good Thing, she tells Faith, is marked by famine and misery. It is not much to go on, but it propels sweet Faith Cross away from her rural Dixie and her lost love Alpha Omega Holmes to the lower depths of the Windy City, and from a soulless middle-class existence to the interior of her memories and her hopes. Here, in this quest for the Good Thing, we have the human adventure. We also have the story of Faith Cross - a metaphysical yarn spun from pure feeling; from sex, love, suffering, beauty, and truth. Set to the music of the spheres, haunted by a philosopher’s spirit, conjured up from dreams and disasters, the adventure-strewn path to Faith’s Good Thing lies before us and powerfully beckons us to follow. Trust Charles Johnson, a storyteller with a sorcerer’s touch, to realize the moment of truth. In this remarkable, relentlessly fascinating first novel, he blends superstition, folk tale, and sharply edged realism to bring us closer to that Good Thing than perhaps even he will ever know.

CHARLES JOHNSON received the National Book Award for MIDDLE PASSAGE in 1990. Currently the Pollock Professor of English at the University of Washington, he lives in Seattle.

 


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