Zenosbooks

(12/07/2012) Andrea Camilleri: A Companion to the Mystery Fiction by Lucia Rinaldi. Jefferson and London. 2012. McFarland & Company. 179 pages. paperback. keywords: Literary Criticism Mystery Sicily Andrea Camilleri Literature Translated Reference. 9780786446704. Front cover images: (inset) Portrait of Andrea Camilleri, pencil on cardboard, 30cm x 50cm, 2009, by Messina artist Pietro Bitto; sailboat - 2012, Shutterstock.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

    This is the first comprehensive reference work in English dedicated to the writing of world-famous Italian mystery writer Andrea Camilleri. It includes entries on plots, characters, dates, literary motifs, and themes from the bestselling author’s detective stories and television crime dramas, with special attention given to the serialized policeman Inspector Salvo Montalbano, Camilleri’s most famous character. It also equips the reader with background information on Camilleri’s life and career and provides a guide to the writings of reviewers and critics.

LUCIA RINALDI is a teaching fellow at University College London, Department of Italian. Her main research interests are 20th-century Italian literature and culture, in particular crime fiction. She has published articles on Italian crime writers and is coeditor of ASSASSINATIONS AND MURDER IN MODERN ITALY: TRANSFORMATIONS IN SOCIETY AND CULTURE (2007).

 


Check zenosbooks.com for either a used or a new copy of this book, or you can add it to your wishlist.

 


 


Search

Who's Online

We have 44 guests and no members online

Zeno's Picks

Democracy Now!

Democracy Now!

18 December 2018

Democracy Now! is an independent daily TV & radio news program, hosted by award-winning journalists Amy Goodman and Juan González. We provide daily global news headlines, in-depth interviews and investigative reports without any advertisements or government funding. Our programming shines a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lifts up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. Democracy Now! is live weekdays at 8am ET and available 24/7 through our website and podcasts.

Words Without Borders

Words Without Borders

18 December 2018

Words Without Borders:The Online Magazine of International Literature
  • After Midnight

    Presented here for the first time in English, the cult writer Charles Chahwan—"Lebanon's answer to Charles Bukowski"—tells a tale of rival militiamen euphoric with violence.   Under the gentle

    ...
  • The Watchlist: December 2018

    Each month, Tobias Carroll shares a handful of recently released or forthcoming titles in translation that he’s especially excited about.   From Archipelago Books | The Barefoot Woman by

    ...
  • A Holiday Gift Guide for Children’s Literature in Translation

    In the past, I often felt lost buying books for the kids of friends and families. Goodnight, Moon may be inexhaustibly good, but everyone already has it; same with The Phantom Tollbooth; same with most all of

    ...
  • Shadow and Light: Three Poems

    18ème arrondissement To Nuno Júdice The sculptors of Montmartre must have studied anatomy (in depth) to chisel such beauty into their sacred figures. Or else wandered around (from

    ...
  • First Read—From “Away! Away!”

    The following excerpt is from Jana Beňová’s Away! Away!, translated by Janet Livingstone and out tomorrow from Two Dollar Radio. With Beňová’s signature

    ...
  • Living with the Tao

    John Minford reflects on his experience with Taoism and as a translator of Taoist texts, including Lao Tzu’s the Tao Te Ching, out this week with Viking.   When the Oxford police arrested me

    ...
  • “The Anarchist Who Shared My Name,” the Oulipo, and Contemporary Nonfiction

    Tobias Carroll explores Pablo Martín Sánchez’s recently released The Anarchist Who Shared My Name (tr. Jeffrey Diteman, Deep Vellum Publishing) within the context of the Oulipo collective and

    ...
  • Akram Aylisli’s Literary Odyssey

    Akram Aylisli’s Farewell, Aylis: A Non-Traditional Novel in Three Works was recently published by Academic Studies Press. Katherine E. Young, who translated the novel from the Russian, explores the

    ...
  • Works Cited In Franciane Conceição Silva’s Panorama of Afro-Brazilian Literature

    References and Further Reading  Alves, Miriam.Mulher Mat(r)iz. Belo Horizonte: Nandyala, 2011. Alves, Miriam. Entrevista. Duke, Dawn (Org.). A escritora afro-brasileira: ativismo e arte literária. Belo

    ...

New York Review of Books

The New York Review of Books

18 December 2018

Recent items from nybooks.com
  • ‘The Weekly Standard’: a Record of Failed Regime Change
    For most neocons, however, journalism has never been more than a Leninist means to an end—to form an intellectual vanguard. For it is political influence that the neocons crave. Kristol worked to destroy the 1993 Clinton Healthcare bill and sought...
  • Let the People Take Back Control of Brexit
    A university degree was the best predictor of how you would vote in the 2016 EU referendum. In a very real sense, it was a tug of war between those who do and those who don’t have agency in their lives. Three years later, it still is. For those who...
  • Regulate It, Man
    Emily Dufton’s timely book Grass Roots: The Rise and Fall and Rise of Marijuana in America deftly chronicles the battle over the most popular semi-illegal substance in the US. It is a story of revolution, counterrevolution, pyrrhic...
  • Walton Ford: Twenty-First-Century Naturalist
    Since the 1990s, Walton Ford has been retrospectively caught up in the nineteenth century’s obsession with nature, back when the mountains were crawling with lions, and the sky was full of birds. His new series “Barbary,” on display at Kasmin’s new...
  • India’s Farmers on the March
    Agriculture in India relies heavily on rain and temperature in the growing season; farmers here are highly sensitive to climate. They have already felt the beginning of the apocalypse in the form of dried-up wells, declining yields, and mass...
  • Hive Mentalities
    Bees evolved from wasp ancestors around 100 million years ago. Most wasps are sleek carnivores, but bees are flower-loving, long-haired, and often social vegetarians (the branched hairs that cover their bodies trap pollen, which, along with nectar,...
  • War Song
    1937
    Beckett got
    stabbed by
    pliant spear
    of a stranger,
    one Paris night.
  • American Women of the Far Right
    Much has been said and written about the “toxic masculinity” of the far right and white supremacy, but on the other side is a toxic femininity just as invested in the idea of a whiteness as victimized, at risk, and requiring protection. Not all...
  • The Pro-Israel Push to Purge US Campus Critics
    The US Department of Education recently adopted a new definition of anti-Semitism, one that equates any criticism of Israel with a hatred of Jews. Watching how Temple University leaders failed to defend Professor Marc Lamont Hill when the...

Neglectedbooks.com

The Neglected Books Page

18 December 2018

www.NeglectedBooks.com: Where forgotten books are remembered
  • The Ritz Carltons, by Fillmore Hyde (1927)

    Remember when it was still possible to make fun of rich people? Like Thurston Howell III and his wife, Lovey, on Gilligan’s Island? Or the silly, spoiled heiresses in High Society and My Man Godfrey? Well, if you’re nostalgic for a time when the idle rich were valid objects of ridicule instead of reality TV... Read more

    The post ...

  • All Night at Mr. Stanyhurst’s, by Hugh Edwards (1933)

    Except. Remember that Lucy is described as Stanyhurst’s sixteen year-old mistress. We learn that he first met Lucy at the age of fourteen, when she was the mistress of his uncle, Lord Cluny, and that he eventually steals the girl away from him. At the start of the evening, before the abbé and the sailor... Read more

    The post ...

  • Jesus Be a Fence Around Me, by the Soul Stirrers (1961)

    I want to go off piste for a moment to talk about my second love. About the same time I became interested in discovering neglected books, I also started to read and listen to ever-expanding circles of music. I think it was Peter Guralnick’s Feel Like Going Home that hooked me, but it could just... Read more

    The post ...

  • The Last Blue Sea, by David Forrest (1959)

    David Forrest was the pen-name of Australian writer, academic and historian David Denholm (1924-1997). Among his numerous works of non-fiction, including an acclaimed history, The Colonial Australians about the early white settlement of the country, were a few novels. The Last Blue Sea, published in 1959, was his first. The book drew considerably praise and... Read

    ...
  • A Letter from My Father, edited by Page Smith (1976)

    “It was my father’s strange conceit to write me a letter, the writing of which extended over a period of more than thirty years, and which, ultimately, reached ten thousand pages in length, a total of over two and a half million words,” Page Smith writes in his introduction to this book, which should be... Read more

    The post ...

  • A Walk in the Sun, by Harry Brown (1944)

    A Walk in the Sun was a slim war novel first published in 1944 which generated considerable hype and attention upon its initial release, followed closely by a successful film version. Yet, despite the praise of many reviewers and the conviction that this was a major work of war fiction, the book was soon forgotten.... Read more

    The post ...

  • Inez Holden: A Memoir, by Anthony Powell

    From London Magazine, Oct/Nov 1974, Vol. 14 No. 4, a remembrance of Inez Holden, author of There’s No Story There, reviewed here in August: Inez Holden died on 30 May this year. She had been unwell for some little time, but her death was unexpectedly sudden. I never had what might be called a day-to-day... Read more

    The post ...

  • The King of the Barbareens, by Janet Hitchman (1960)

    The King of the Barbareens is a memoir of a childhood spent as a bit of flotsam tossed about in the social welfare system that existed in England in the early part of the 20th century. Apart from an impression of watching an Armistice parade at the age of two, Janet Hitchman’s first memories are... Read more

    The post ...

  • Signed With Their Honour, by James Aldridge (1942)

    James Aldridge (1918- 2015) was an Australian journalist and war correspondent who covered the Second World War in Greece, Crete and North Africa 1940-1941. Signed With Their Honour was his first novel. Aldridge enjoyed a period of considerable success in the late-war to post-war period and his biggest-selling novel was The Diplomat published in 1949.... Read

    ...
  • “The City Cosmic,” by Roy Ivan Johnson, from The Fourth Watch

    The City Cosmic This morning The lure of the street Entangled my feet And I walked … and walked … and walked … I turned into the narrowest streets, I breathed the smoke of the factories, I smelled the reek and rot of the tenements; I passed by ancient spacious lawns and piles of masonry... Read more

    The post ...

Copyright © 2018 Zenosbooks. All Rights Reserved.
Joomla! is Free Software released under the GNU General Public License.