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(12/07/2012) Andrea Camilleri: A Companion to the Mystery Fiction by Lucia Rinaldi. Jefferson and London. 2012. McFarland & Company. 179 pages. paperback. keywords: Literary Criticism Mystery Sicily Andrea Camilleri Literature Translated Reference. 9780786446704. Front cover images: (inset) Portrait of Andrea Camilleri, pencil on cardboard, 30cm x 50cm, 2009, by Messina artist Pietro Bitto; sailboat - 2012, Shutterstock.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

    This is the first comprehensive reference work in English dedicated to the writing of world-famous Italian mystery writer Andrea Camilleri. It includes entries on plots, characters, dates, literary motifs, and themes from the bestselling author’s detective stories and television crime dramas, with special attention given to the serialized policeman Inspector Salvo Montalbano, Camilleri’s most famous character. It also equips the reader with background information on Camilleri’s life and career and provides a guide to the writings of reviewers and critics.

LUCIA RINALDI is a teaching fellow at University College London, Department of Italian. Her main research interests are 20th-century Italian literature and culture, in particular crime fiction. She has published articles on Italian crime writers and is coeditor of ASSASSINATIONS AND MURDER IN MODERN ITALY: TRANSFORMATIONS IN SOCIETY AND CULTURE (2007).

 


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