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(10/10/2011) Mysteries by Knut Hamsun. New York. 1975. Avon/Bard. Translated from the Norwegian by Gerry Bothmer. keywords: Literature Norway Translated. 255 pages. 0380005042. October 1975.

FROM THE PUBLISHER -

   A STRANGE YOUNG MAN. Johan Nilsen Nagel burst upon the small coastal town like a thunderbolt. Audacious, unpredictable, clothed in a loud yellow suit and an aura of contradiction, he became deeply entangled with the small town’s most respected ‘solid citizens’; bringing out hidden undercurrents of bitterness and hatred. MYSTERIES is Knut Hamsun’s searing portrait of a man trapped in a self-made cage - an intense novel which relentlessly reveals man’s constant, consuming duality. Of MYSTERIES, novelist Henry Miller has said, ’It is closer to me than any other book I have ever read. Hamsun is the author I deliberately tried to imitate. He seems to have been to those of my generation what Dickens was to the readers of his time. We read everything he wrote and panted for more.

 

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