Latin America
Abad, Hector. Oblivion: A Memoir. New York. 2012. Farrar Straus Giroux. 9780374223977. Translated from the Spanish by Anne McLean and Rosalind Harvey. 263 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Nayon Cho.

Oblivion is a heartbreaking, exquisitely written memorial to the author’s father, Héctor Abad Gómez, whose criticism of the Colombian regime led to his murder by paramilitaries in 1987. Twenty years in the writing, it paints an unforgettable picture of a man who followed his conscience and paid for it with his life during one of the darkest periods in Latin America’s recent history. PRAISE FOR OBLIVION: A MEMOIR… It is very difficult to summarize Oblivion without betraying it, because, like all great works, it is many things at once. To say that it is a heartrending memoir of the author’s family and father—who was murdered by a hired assassin—is true, but paltry and infinitesimal, because the book is also a moving immersion into the inferno of Colombian political violence, into the life and soul of the city of Medellín, into the private life and public courage of a family, a true story that is also a superb fiction due to the way it is written and constructed, and one of the most eloquent arguments written in our time or any time against terror as an instrument of political action. —Mario Vargas Llosa. [Oblivion] emits a primal yet articulate howl . . . Mr. Abad’s prose, in this translation by Anne McLean and Rosalind Harvey, is elastic and alive . . . In Spanish the verb ‘to remember’ is ‘recordar,’ the author reminds us, a word that derives from ‘cor,’ the Latin for heart. This memoir is extravagantly big-hearted. It will be stocked, in good bookstores, in the nonfiction or belles-lettres sections. A wise owner might also place a copy under the sign that more simply reads: Parenting. —Dwight Garner, The New York Times. [An] admirable effort at speaking the unspeakable, at verbalizing the pain accumulated over decades, is Héctor Abad’s extraordinary memoir Oblivion. It’s been years since I read such a powerful meditation on loss . . . I confess not to have known of [Abad] before, even though this is his second book translated into English. This ignorance was actually beneficial, for it allowed me to submerge myself in the narrative without preconception. I emerged from that submersion hypnotized. Oblivion will remind you in equal measure of Vittorio de Sica’s Italian neo-Realist movie The Bicycle Thief and Elie Wiesel’s Holocaust novel Night . . . [Abad’s] desire to explore the echoes of memory with meticulous care, to touch the wound of the past through lucid prose, is an act of valor. —Ilan Stavans, San Francisco Chronicle. A family memoir that deserves classic status . . . [Abad] not only pays radiant homage to a hero but champions the path of peaceful change he so steadfastly took. —Boyd Tonkin, The Independent. A tremendous and necessary book, devastatingly courageous and honest. At times I wondered how [Abad] was brave enough to write it. —Javier Cercas. A beautiful and profoundly moving work. —El País. [Oblivion] is a shattering chronicle of Colombia’s violence. But it is also an inspiring tribute to tolerance and paternal love. —Giles Tremlett, The Guardian. A beautiful, authentic, and moving book. —Rosa Montero. [A] great and deeply moving testament. —Kate Saunders , The Times (London). An unbearably moving, eloquent tribute to the author’s father—who was murdered by Colombian paramilitaries in 1987—that is fit to burst with love and pride." —Holly Kyte, The Telegraph. I store up what I have read by Héctor Abad like spherical, polished, luminous little balls of bread, ready for when I have to walk through a vast forest in the nighttime.—Manuel Rivas. "Colombian author Abad dedicates this loving and sentimental memoir to his father, Héctor Abad Gómez, a professor and doctor devoted to his family, "moved to tears…by poetry and music," and committed to a better Colombia. The latter aspiration cost him his life when he was assassinated in 1987, and his son began writing this book five years later. Abad spends much of the book expressing his love for his father, but it is his discussion of Gómez's public health and human rights projects—such as founding "the Colombian Institute of Family Wellbeing, which built aqueducts and sewer systems in villages, rural districts, and cities"—that reveals what a remarkable educator, reformer, and activist the senior Abad was, and how his assassination was a tragedy for a family and a nation."—Publishers Weekly.

Héctor Abad was born in Medellín, Colombia, in 1958. He was twelve when he wrote his first stories, going on to win the 1980 Colombian National Short Story Prize at just twenty-one. In 1987 his father was murdered by paramilitaries, and Abad was forced to flee to Italy. While in exile he published his first book, Malos Pensamientos (1991) but it was only upon returning to Colombia in 1993 that he became a fulltime writer. His autobiographical Oblivion: A Memoir has recently become available in English.
Abad, Hector. Recipes for Sad Women. London. 2012. Pushkin Press. 9781906548636. Translated from the Spanish by Anne McLean. 156 pages. paperback. Cover illustration: Still Life of Grapes by Gino Severini

An idiosyncratic cookbook for the culinary enlightenment of mind and heart, combining perceptiveness with compassion and wisdom with sensuousness-for whenever we feel overwhelmed by our humanity. A book of ambiguous genre and delicate, playful wisdom, Recipes for Sad Women is not a novel and not a cookbook. But should you wish to know what food to prepare in the case of sobbing or of nervousness, what the closest thing to dinosaur meat is (and therefore the best remedy for guilt), or what to eat when you are perfectly healthy and enjoying reciprocated love, you will find no better collection of recipes on the market. An acclaimed novelist, essayist, journalist and translator, Abad’s eccentric, sensual and wry guide is neither unserious, nor entirely plausible in its advice. Elegant, melancholic, funny and full of morsels of insight, it is deftly and movingly instructional on the proper appreciation of sadness. ‘I store up what I have read by Héctor Abad like spherical, polished, luminous little balls of bread, ready for when I have to walk through a vast forest in the night-time.’ –Manuel Rivas. ‘This is a book that quietly knows what it is to be human, and to bridge, or reconcile, the gap between body and mind.’–Nick Lezard, Guardian. ‘A passion for romantic Borgesianism will be satisfied by Hector Abad’s Recipes for Sad Women, cute vignettes which address a darker sadness’ –Nick Lezard, Guardian Books of the Year 2012.

Héctor Abad was born in Medellín, Colombia, in 1958. He was twelve when he wrote his first stories, going on to win the 1980 Colombian National Short Story Prize at just twenty-one. In 1987 his father was murdered by paramilitaries, and Abad was forced to flee to Italy. While in exile he published his first book, Malos Pensamientos (1991) but it was only upon returning to Colombia in 1993 that he became a fulltime writer. His autobiographical Oblivion: A Memoir has recently become available in English.
Abad, Hector. The Farm. Brooklyn. 2018. Archipelago Press. 9780914671923. Translated from the Spanish by Anne McLean. 471 pages. paperback. Cover art: Simon Abad. Cover design Megan Mangum

Pilar, Eva, and Antonio Ángel are the last heirs of La Oculta, a farm hidden in the mountains of Colombia. The land provides the setting for the siblings’ happiest memories, but it also reminds them of their struggle against the siege of violence and terror, restlessness and flight. In The Farm, Héctor Abad illuminates the vicissitudes of a family and a people, as well as the voices of these three siblings, recounting their loves, fears, desires, and hopes, all against a dazzling backdrop. We enter their lives at the moment they are about to lose the paradise on which they built their dreams and reality.

Héctor Abad was born in Medellín, Colombia, in 1958. He was twelve when he wrote his first stories, going on to win the 1980 Colombian National Short Story Prize at just twenty-one. In 1987 his father was murdered by paramilitaries, and Abad was forced to flee to Italy. While in exile he published his first book, Malos Pensamientos (1991) but it was only upon returning to Colombia in 1993 that he became a fulltime writer. His autobiographical Oblivion: A Memoir has recently become available in English.
Abreu, Caio Fernando. Whatever Happened To Dulce Veiga?. Austin. 2000. University Of Texas Press. 029270500x. Translated from the Portuguese & With An Afterword & Glossary by Adria Frizzi. 200 pages. hardcover.

A forty-year-old Brazilian journalist reduced to living in a dilapidated building inhabited by a bizarre human fauna-fortune-tellers, transvestites, tango-loving Argentinean hustlers-is called upon to track down and write the story of Dulce Veiga, a famous singer who disappeared twenty years earlier on the eve of her first big show. Thus begins a mad race through an underground, nocturnal São Paulo among rock bands with eccentric names, feline reincarnations of Vita Sackville-West, ex-revolutionaries turned junkies, gay Pietas, echoes of Afro-Brazilian religions, and intimations of AIDS . . . Constructed like a mystery, the novel unravels over a week, evoking a decadent and contaminated atmosphere in which the journalist’s own search for meaning finds its expression in the elusive Dulce Veiga, who constantly appears to him as if in a dream, her arm pointing heavenward. Whatever Happened to Dulce Veiga? is a descent into the underworld of contemporary megalopolises where, like the inside of a huge TV, life intermingles with bits of music, film clips, and soap opera characters in a crazy and macabre dance, moving toward a possible catharsis.

Caio Fernando Abreu (September 12, 1948, Santiago, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil - February 25, 1996, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil) was an award-winning journalist, novelist, short-story writer, and playwright who portrayed, as no other contemporary writer, the myriad contradictions of urban Brazil. His untimely death, as well as his courageous stand on AIDS and the growing popular interest in gay literature, will likely result in renewed attention to his playful yet urgent brand of postmodern writing. Adria Frizzi is a translator and critic who teaches in the Department of French and Italian at the University of Texas at Austin.
Abreu, Joao Capistrano De. Chapters of Brazil's Colonial History 1500-1800. New York. 1997. Oxford University Press. 0195103017. Preface by Fernando A. Novais. Introduction by Stuart Schwartz. Translated from the Portuguese by Arthur Brakel. Library of Latin America series. 236 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Kathleen M Lynch. Jacket illustration by Giraudon/Art Resource.

This accomplished new translation of a Brazilian classic will be an integral volume in Oxford’s new Library of Latin America, Never before available in English, this superb narrative opens Brazil’s rich, fascinating past to the general reader, and offers scholars access to a great turning point in historical scholarship. In all the history of Latin America, few historians have been so influential as the Brazilian scholar Joao Capistrano de Abreu. His own life reflected the changes that swept his country and his academy: the nineteenth-century scion of a remote Brazilian province, he paid his way to the capital by selling a slave he had inherited; he went on to bring Brazilian history into the twentieth century, moving it from patriotic sentimentalism to rigorous, rational scholarship. Now, for the first time, his central work, a classic of historical literature, appears in a sharp, clear English translation. In CHAPTERS OF BRAZIL’S COLONIAL HISTORY, Capistrano de Abreu created an integrated history of Brazil in a landmark work of scholarship that is also a literary masterpiece. Breaking with previous writers, who had taken a plodding governor-after-governor approach that rested upon administration and politics, he offers a startlingly modern analysis of the past, based on the role of the economy, settlement, and the occupation of the interior, In these pages, he combines sharp portraits of dramatic events-close-fought battles against Dutch occupation in the 1650s, Indian resistance to often brutal internal expansion-with insightful social history. A master of Brazil’s ethnographic landscape, he provides detailed sketches of daily life for Brazilians of all stripes. Capistrano de Abreu first won acclaim for a linguistic study of a Brazilian Indian language; he brings that knowledge to play as he describes the interaction between colonial settlers, African slaves, and native inhabitants, as cultures mixed in the creation of the modern nation, He also stresses the role of the physical landscape and environment in ways that presaged contemporary developments in historical scholarship. And along the way, his distinctive voice provides the reader with rare pleasure. After quoting a vivid description of a typical seventeenth-century atrocities. . Arthur Brakel is the translator of Cyro dos Anjos’s Diary of a Civil Servant and João Reis’s Slave Rebellion in Brazil, He resides in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Stuart B. Schwartz is George Burton Adams Professor of History at Yale University. Fernando Novais is a Brazilian scholar currently teaching at the University of Campinas, Brazil. . .

João Capistrano de Abreu (Maranguape, 1853 - Rio de Janeiro, 1927) was a Brazilian historian. His works are characterized by a rigorous investigation of the sources and a critical view of the historical process. João Capistrano de Abreu was born in Maranguape, Ceará. He dedicated himself to the study of colonial Brazil. His book 'Capítulos de História Colonial' ('Chapters of Colonial History') is a major reference for all who study Brazilian history.
Acosta, Juvenal (editor). Light From a Nearby Window: Contemporary Mexican Poetry. San Francisco. 1994. City Lights Books. 087286281x. 231 pages. paperback. Cover design by Rex Ray

LIGHT FROM A NEARBY WINDOW introduces a new generation of poets who have become a driving force in Mexican literature today. Until quite recently, contemporary Mexican poetry has been little-known and virtually unavailable to English-speaking readers. This bilingual anthology includes twenty-one poets - twelve men and none women - all of whom have received national and international recognition. In poems about sexuality and spirituality, politics and marginalization, history and tradition, urban and rural life, they write about the unique experience of being Mexican at the end of the millennium. CONTENTS: INTRODUCTION; LUIS MIGUEL AGUILAR-The War of the Stones; José Maria, Lumberjack; Memo, Who Loved Motorcycles; GASPAR AGUILERA DIAZ- Does Anyone Know Where Roque Dalton Spent His Final Night?; Finally, After So Many Years, Hernán Cortés Declares; MARIA BARANDA- from The Garden of Enchantments; EFRAIN BARTOLOME- House of Monkeys; Letters from Bonampak; Coffee Harvest; ALBERTO BLANCO- The Parakeets; Luxury Hotel; I, Clouded; Good Wishes; Moon of Daily Life; The Poet Does and Doesn’t Have; Why So Many Forms?; CARMEN BOULLOSA- Letter to the Wolf; Fire; The Other; RICARDO CASTILLO- The Poet of the Garden; Ode to the Urge; One Potato, Two; LUCHA CORPI- Undocumented Anguish; from Boundaries; ELSA CROSS- Night of San Miguel; Jaguar; Tenayuca; Uxmal; Malinalco; ANTONIO DELTORO- Submarine; Barefoot Days; The Sold House; Fossils; JORGE ESQUINCA- Fable of the Hunter; Hortensia; FRANCISCO HERNANDEZ- The Boy in the Photograph; Until the Poem Remains; To the Author of ‘Dream Song’; Autograph DAVID HUERTA- November Rain; from Incurable; Packages; EDUARDO LANGAGNE- Earthquake; Opening Up the Caskets; ELVA MACIAS- From Capricorn; Indications; Image and Likeness; FABIO MORABITO- My Regular Appearances; I Hear Cars; Swings; Master of an Expanse; ISABEL QUINONEZ- In Our Desolation; To Flow, Submerge; Craving for Light; Retirement; SILVIA TOMASA RIVERA- I sense you careening downshadow; Mother, I want to go to the sea; We’re at a fiesta; The cowhands; JOSE JAVIER VILLARREAL- An imposing silence Ballad in Memory of François Villon; Untitled IV; MINERVA MARGARITA VILLARREAL- Song of Penelope; Sleep’s Faithless Lady; VERONICA VOLKOW-The House; Hunger; Deep darkness; You are naked; The Circle; God; CONTRIBUTORS’ NOTES. . . JUVENAL ACOSTA was born in Mexico City in 1961. He studied economics in Mexico City, and philosophy in Morelia, Michoacan, where he lived, miraculously, as a poet. He is the author of the prize-winning Diciendo unas palabras negras and PAPER OF LIVE FLESH. He lives in Berkeley, California. . TRANSLATORS - F. Bell, Forrest Gander, Robert L. Jones, Elaine Katzenberger, Michael Koch, W S. Merwin, Nancy J. Peters, LaVonne Poteet, Catherine Rodriguez-Nieto, John Oliver Simon, Iona Whishaw. . The following poems were published originally in these Spanish-language editions: LUIS MIGUEL AGUILAR-La guerra de las piedras; José Maria, maderero; Memo, motociclista-from Todo lo que se, Editorial Cal y Arena, 1996. GASPAR AGUILERA DIAZ-Alguien sabe donde paso la ultima noche Roque Dalton?; Al fin después de tantos anos Hernan Cortés declara-from Zona do derrumbe, Editorial Katum, 1984. MARIA BARANDA-Parte I del libro-from El jardin do los encantamientos, Coleccion Molinos de Viento, Universidad AutOnoma Metropolitana, 1989. EFRAIN BARTOLOMÉ-Casa de los monos; Cartas desde Bonampak; Corte de café-from Ojo de jaguar, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, (UNAM), 1990. ALBERTO BLANCO-Los pericos-from El libro do los pajaros, Ediciones Toledo, 1990. Para qué tantas formas?-from Cromos, INBA/SEP, 1987. CARMEN BOULLOSA-Carta al lobo; El fuego; El otro-from La Salvaja, Fondo de Cultura Economica, 1989. RICARDO CASTILLO-El poeta del jardin; Oda a las ganas; Pin uno, pin dos-from El pobrecito señor X, Fondo de Cultura Economica, 1980. LUCHA CORPI-Margenes; Indocumentada angustia-from Variaciones sobre una tempestad/Variations on a Storm, Third Woman Press, 1990. ELSA CROSS-Noche de San Miguel; Jaguar; Tenayuca; Uxmal; Malinalco-from Jaguar, Ediciones Toledo, 1991. ANTONIO DELTORO-Submarino; Los dias descalzos; La casa vendida; Fosiles-from Los dias descalzos, Editorial Vuelta, 1993. JORGE ESQUINCA-Fabula del cazador; Hortensia-from El cardo en la voz, Editorial Joaquin Mortiz, 1991. FRANCISCO HERNÂNDEZ-El nino de la fotografia; Hasta que el verso quede-from En las pupilas del que regresa, UNAM, 1993. DAVID HUERTA-Lluvias de noviembre-from Lluvias de noviembre, Multiarte, 1976. Incurable (Fragment)-from Incurable, Editorial ERA, 1987. EDUARDO LANGAGNE-El temblor-from A la manera del viejo escarabajo, Gobierno de Sinaloa, 1990. ELVA MACIAS-De capricornio-from Lejos de la memoria, Jean Boldo i Climent, Editores, 1989. Imagen y semejanza-from Imagen y semejanza, UNAM, 1982. FABIO MORIBITO-Mi periódica aparicion; Oigo los coches; Los columpios; Dueno de una amplitud-from De lunes todo el año, Joaquin Mortiz, 1992. SILVIA TOMASA RIVERA-Te siento correr sombras abajo-from Poemas al desconocido/ poemas a la desconocida, Penelope, 1984. Madre, quiero ir al mar; Estamos de fiesta; Los vaqueros-from Duelo de espadas, FCE, 1987. JOSÉ JAVIER VILLARREAL-Un largo silencio; Balada a la memoria de François Villon; Sin Titulo IV-from La procesion, Joaquin Mortiz, 1991. MINERVA MARGARITA VILLARREAL-Canción de Penelope; Dama infiel al sueno-from Dama infiel al sueño, Cuarto Menguante, 1991. VERONICA VOLKOW-La casa; El hambre; Profunda oscuridad; Estas desnudo; El circulo; Dios-from El incio, Joaquin Mortiz, 1983. .

Juvenal Acosta is a fiction writer, poet, and journalist born in Mexico in 1961. He has edited two anthologies of contemporary Mexican poetry published by City Lights Books. The original version of The Tattoo Hunter (El Cazador de Tatuajes), his first novel, was published in Mexico City to wide critical acclaim. This Fall, The Violence of Velvet (Terciopelo Violento), his second novel, will be released by Planeta Press. His essay on bullfighting, ‘The Gaze and the Blood,’ was translated into English by Gregory Rabassa and published by Periplus Books in London as an introduction to Tauromachia, a book of photography. Acosta writes for Cambio, a weekly magazine published by Gabriel García Márquez in Mexico City, directs the M.F.A. in Writing and Consciousness at the New College of California, and teaches creative writing at the California College of Arts and Crafts in San Francisco.
Acosta, Juvenal. The Tattoo Hunter. Berkeley. 2002. Creative Arts Book Company. 0887394965. 181 pages. paperback. Cover photograph by Eric Mertens

From the date of its original publication in Spanish, The Tattoo Hunter established itself as a new classic of the city by the Bay. Now in translation, this neo-noir novel is finally available to the English language reader. The Tattoo Hunter is a powerful account of the dark side of sexuality and its effects on human consciousness. Written in an enticing poetic style, this story of curiosity and seduction takes us from the very origins of the Cretan labyrinth to the labyrinth drawn on the soft skin of its most intriguing character, the Countess, in a desperate hunt for meaning. The elegant prose and provocative atmosphere immerse us in a world of velvet, Goth women, and red wine spilled on naked bodies, as we follow the steps of this unique, intellectual hunter.

Juvenal Acosta is a fiction writer, poet, and journalist born in Mexico in 1961. He has edited two anthologies of contemporary Mexican poetry published by City Lights Books. The original version of The Tattoo Hunter (El Cazador de Tatuajes), his first novel, was published in Mexico City to wide critical acclaim. This Fall, The Violence of Velvet (Terciopelo Violento), his second novel, will be released by Planeta Press. His essay on bullfighting, ‘The Gaze and the Blood,’ was translated into English by Gregory Rabassa and published by Periplus Books in London as an introduction to Tauromachia, a book of photography. Acosta writes for Cambio, a weekly magazine published by Gabriel García Márquez in Mexico City, directs the M.F.A. in Writing and Consciousness at the New College of California, and teaches creative writing at the California College of Arts and Crafts in San Francisco.
Ada, Alma Flor. Under the Royal Palms: A Childhood in Cuba. New York. 1998. Atheneum. 0689806310. 88 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Nina Barnett

In this companion volume to Alma Flor Ada’s WHERE THE FLAME TREES BLOOM, the author offers young readers another inspiring collection of stories and reminiscences drawn from her childhood on the island of Cuba. Through those stories we see how the many events and relationships she enjoyed helped shape who she is today. We learn of a deep friendship with a beloved dance teacher that helped sustain young Alma Flor through a miserable year in school. We meet relatives, like her mysterious Uncle Manolo, whose secret, she later learns, is that he dedicated his life to healing lepers. We share the tragedy of another uncle whose spirited personality leads to his love of flying. . . and the crash that takes his life. Heartwarming, poignant, and often humorous, this collection encourages children to discover the stories in their own lives - stories that can help inform their own values and celebrate the joys and struggles we all share no matter where or when we grew up.

Alma Flor Ada (born January 3, 1938 in Camagüey, Cuba) has lived in Cuba, Spain, and Peru. She now lives in San Francisco, California, where she is a Professor Emerita of multicultural education at the University of San Francisco. She is an award-winning Cuban-American author of children’s books, poetry, and novels. Dr. Ada is recognized for her work promoting bilingual and multicultural education in the United States.
Adams, Jerome R. Latin American Heroes: Liberators and Patriots from 1500 to the Present. New York. 1993. Ballantine Books. 0345383842. 289 pages. paperback. Cover design by Kristine V. Mills

Many North Americans are unaware of the history and politics of Latin America, and Latin American Heroes goes a long way to redress this lack of knowledge. These profiles of twenty-three history makers offer a unique view of Latin America through the eyes of men and women who devoted their lives to their countries, and to the freedom of their people. Here are fascinating mini-biographies of such influential and important subjects as Dona Marina (La Malinche), a former slave, born in 1505, who became an invaluable translator for Cortes; Toussaint L’Ouverture, who led Haitians to rebel against their French masters in the first major slave revolt in the new world, Jose Marti, the journalist, revolutionary, poet, orator, and charismatic leader of the fight to free Cuba from Spanish domination, and the modern martyr Bishop Romero, who, as an outspoken Catholic clergyman opposed to the abuses of the rightist regime in El Salvador, was murdered for his beliefs. You’ll also learn about Brazil’s Emperors Pedro I and Pedro II, the Women of the Mexican Revolution, Argentina’s Juan and Eva Peron, Mexico’s Emiliano Zapata, Venezuela’s Simon Bolivar, and Cuba’s Che Guevara. A straightforward and thoroughly researched biographical reference that amplifies some of the most significant voices in Latin America, past and present, Latin American Heroes is a long-overdue tribute to the people whose fearless struggle for self-determination changed history.

Jerome R. Adams is a freelance journalist living in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He is the author of Notable Latin American Women: Twenty-Nine Leaders, Rebels, Poets, Battlers and Spies, 1500–1900; Greasers and Gringos: The Historical Roots of Anglo-Hispanic Prejudice; and Liberators, Patriots and Leaders of Latin America: 32 Biographies.
Adams, M. Ian. Three Authors of Alienation: Bombal, Onetti, Carpentier. Austin. 1975. University Of Texas Press. 0292780095. Latin American Monographs, No.36. 128 pages. hardcover. Cover illustration by Jim Harter.

In THREE AUTHORS OF ALIENATION, an exploration of the literary expression of alienation, M. Ian Adams discusses the works of three contemporary Latin American authors. The fiction of Maria Luisa Bombal, Juan Carlos Onetti, and Alejo Carpentier reflects alienation, disgust with life, and a feeling of nothingness arising from the conditions of modern society. However, each author treats the theme differently. In La Oltima niebla, Maria Luisa Bombal uses poetic imagery to create the emotional life of the protagonist. Juan Carlos Onetti portrays the schizoid extreme of alienation with a complex of symbols based on changes of vision caused by the mental states of his characters. In Los pasos perdidos, Alejo Carpentier presents the problem of the modern alienated artist who attempts to rid himself of his social alienation by changing times and cultures. In his close analysis of the works discussed, Adams considers each literary element in its context and also in terms of its relation to the larger artistic vision of the author. In addition, he places the works of the three authors in the greater perspective of modern social problems by discussing the concepts of social alienation proposed by Erich Fromm and Erich Kahler. His conclusion is that, although disgust with life and feelings of meaninglessness are at the heart of the experiences of the characters of all three authors, only in Alejo Carpentier’s Los pasos perdidos are social conditions the major cause of alienation. In the works of Bombal and Onetti, alienation is a result not of social conditions, but of factors unique to the characters’ personalities and circumstances. THREE AUTHORS OF ALIENATION is a solid contribution to criticism of contemporary Latin American narrative. Adams’s projection of a social problem into the realm of aesthetic experience yields new interpretations of both the problem and the literature.

M. Ian Adams received his doctorate from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972. He is now a professor of Spanish at the University of Wyoming.
Adams, M. Ian. Three Authors of Alienation: Bombal, Onetti, Carpentier. Austin. 1975. University Of Texas Press. 0292780095. 128 pages. hardcover. Cover illustration by Jim Harter.

As a philosophical and social concept, alienation covers a broad range of mental states, both normal and abnormal. Correspondingly, a wide range of literary forms has been employed to deal with this important theme. In THREE AUTHORS OF ALIENATION, an exploration of the literary expression of alienation, M. Ian Adams discusses the works of three contemporary Latin American authors. The fiction of Maria Luisa Bombal, Juan Carlos Onetti, and Alejo Carpentier reflects alienation, disgust with life, and a feeling of nothingness arising from the conditions of modern society. However, each author treats the theme differently. In La Oltima niebla, Maria Luisa Bombal uses poetic imagery to create the emotional life of the protagonist. Juan Carlos Onetti portrays the schizoid extreme of alienation with a complex of symbols based on changes of vision caused by the mental states of his characters. In Los pasos perdidos, Alejo Carpentier presents the problem of the modern alienated artist who attempts to rid himself of his social alienation by changing times and cultures. In his close analysis of the works discussed, Adams considers each literary element in its context and also in terms of its relation to the larger artistic vision of the author. In addition, he places the works of the three authors in the greater perspective of modern social problems by discussing the concepts of social alienation proposed by Erich Fromm and Erich Kahler. His conclusion is that, although disgust with life and feelings of meaninglessness are at the heart of the experiences of the characters of all three authors, only in Alejo Carpentier’s Los pasos perdidos are social conditions the major cause of alienation. In the works of Bombal and Onetti, alienation is a result not of social conditions, but of factors unique to the characters’ personalities and circumstances. THREE AUTHORS OF ALIENATION is a solid contribution to criticism of contemporary Latin American narrative. Adams’s projection of a social problem into the realm of aesthetic experience yields new interpretations of both the problem and the literature. Latin American Monographs, No.36.

M. Ian Adams received his doctorate from the University of Texas at Austin in 1972. He is now a professor of Spanish at the University of Wyoming.
Adan, Martin. The Cardboard House. Saint Paul. 1990. Graywolf Press. 1555971296. Translated from the Spanish by Katherine Silver. 105 pages. hardcover. Cover art - 'Mistico' by Xul Solar. Cover design by Tree Swenson

When THE CARDBOARD HOUSE was published in 1928, it was received with high critical acclaim. Adán was hailed as a great innovator of Peruvian literature and the most promising young writer of his generation. For a while he moved in Lima’s literary circles and marginally participated in the political and cultural debates that raged at that time. Soon thereafter, the traces of his life fade into an alcoholic haze. There are anecdotes about the coffee houses he visited, the odd scrapes of napkins on which he wrote his poetry, and his increasing isolation, an isolation that became absolute when he committed himself to a ‘house of rest,’ less euphemistically called a psychiatric hospital. There he remained until 1985, when his physical condition necessitated his removal to a different kind of hospital. He died that same year. During his almost forty years of self-imposed confinement, he jealously guarded his solitude, shunning all public attention and only allowing visits from his editor, Juan Mejia Baca, and a few close friends. THE CARDBOARD HOUSE is the only piece of prose Martin Adán ever completed. Some six or seven volumes of poetry were published during his lifetime and this due largely to the painstaking and devoted labor of Mejia Baca, who collected the bits and pieces of paper Adán left strewn along his path. Though he never quite lived up to the expectations created by the brilliance of THE CARDBOARD HOUSE he is still commonly referred to as one of the greatest Latin American poets of all time.

Martín Adán (Lima, 1908 - 1985), pseudonym of Rafael de la Fuente Benavides, was a Peruvian poet whose body of work is notable for its hermeticism and metaphysical depth. From a very young age Adán demonstrated great literary talent (talent he shared with classmates Emilio Adolfo Westphalen and Estuardo Núñez). As time passed, he lived with increasing economic difficulty and suffered from serious alcoholism. A good part of his final years were spent in sanitariums, until his death in 1985.
Adan, Martin. The Cardboard House. Saint Paul. 1990. Graywolf Press. 1555971296. Translated from the Spanish by Katherine Silver. 105 pages. hardcover. Cover art - 'Mistico' by Xul Solar. Cover design by Tree Swenson

When Adán began composing THE CARDBOARD HOUSE at the age of eighteen, the neighborhood of Barranco for him was also fragments of memory, imagination, sensations, nostalgic yearnings. The resort, as he had known it, and his place in it, had ceased to exist. His family, aristocratic but in full economic decadence, had sold their Barranco chalet some years before to pay off debts. With the money that was left over, they purchased a Ford automobile so that Rafael’s mother and aunts could ‘go to church in style’. Biographical information about Martin Adán is sparse and anecdotal. He was born in Lima in 1908. By the time he was a young adult, he had lost every member of his immediate family: his younger brother died when they were children, then his father, his mother, and finally the aunt and uncle under whose care he had been placed. He attended the German High School, where many of his classmates and teachers were or would become leading figures in Peru’s artistic and intellectual life. When THE CARDBOARD HOUSE was published in 1928, it was received with high critical acclaim. Adán was hailed as a great innovator of Peruvian literature and the most promising young writer of his generation. For a while he moved in Lima’s literary circles and marginally participated in the political and cultural debates that raged at that time. Soon thereafter, the traces of his life fade into an alcoholic haze. There are anecdotes about the coffee houses he visited, the odd scrapes of napkins on which he wrote his poetry, and his increasing isolation, an isolation that became absolute when he committed himself to a ‘house of rest,’ less euphemistically called a psychiatric hospital. There he remained until 1985, when his physical condition necessitated his removal to a different kind of hospital. He died that same year. During his almost forty years of self-imposed confinement, he jealously guarded his solitude, shunning all public attention and only allowing visits from his editor, Juan Mejia Baca, and a few close friends. During one of the only interviews he ever granted - and this after the interviewer had spent years soliciting a meeting that Adán cut short after a few questions - he said he wrote THE CARDBOARD HOUSE to practice the rules his grammar professor, Emilio Huidobro, had given him. THE CARDBOARD HOUSE is the only piece of prose Martin Adán ever completed. Some six or seven volumes of poetry were published during his lifetime and this due largely to the painstaking and devoted labor of Mejia Baca, who collected the bits and pieces of paper Adán left strewn along his path. Though he never quite lived up to the expectations created by the brilliance of THE CARDBOARD HOUSE he is still commonly referred to as one of the greatest Latin American poets of all time. . Originally published in Spanish as La casa de carton.

Martín Adán (October 27, 1908, Lima, Peru - January 29, 1985, Lima), pseudonym of Rafael de la Fuente Benavides, was a Peruvian poet whose body of work is notable for its hermeticism and metaphysical depth. From a very young age Adán demonstrated great literary talent (talent he shared with classmates Emilio Adolfo Westphalen and Estuardo Núñez). As time passed, he lived with increasing economic difficulty and suffered from serious alcoholism. A good part of his final years were spent in sanitariums, until his death in 1985.
Ades, Dawn. Art in Latin America: The Modern Era, 1820-1980. New Haven. 1989. Yale University Press. 0300045565. 361 pages. hardcover.

This authoritative and beautiful book presents the first continuous narrative history of Latin American art from the years of the Independence movements in the 1820s up to the present day. Exploring both the indigenous roots and the colonial and post-colonial experiences of the various countries, the book investigates fascinating though little-known aspects of nineteenth and twentieth-century art and also provides a context for the contemporary art of the continent. Contents : Independence and its heroes -- Academies and historical painting -- Traveller-reporter artists and the empirical tradition in post-independence Latin America / by Stanton Loomis Catlin -- Nature, science and the picturesque -- José María Velasco -- Posada and the popular graphic tradition -- Modernism and the search for roots -- The Taller de gráfica popular -- Indigenism and social realism -- Private worlds and public myths -- Arte madí/arte concreto-invencíon -- A radical leap / by Guy Brett -- History and identity.

Josephine Dawn Adès (née Tylden-Pattenson; born 6 May 1943), also known as Dawn Ades, is a British art historian and academic. She is professor emeritus of art history and theory at the University of Essex.
Agosin, Marjorie (editor). A Dream of Light & Shadow: Portraits of Latin American Women Writers. Albuquerque. 1995. University Of New Mexico Press. 0826316336. 342 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Linda Mae Tratechaud.

Sixteen original essays of women writers from Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, Costa Rica, Colombia, Ecuador, Uruguay, Argentina, and Brazil are gathered in this book. Each establishes the relationship between the biography of the subject and her literary production. Some of these writers, like Nobel Prize-winner Gabriela Mistral, Elena Poniatowska, and Victoria Ocampo, are well known; others are still largely undiscovered. All of them defy the limits imposed upon them by society, and all have been able to find freedom through creative imagination. All the writers included here are vitally concerned with the problems women face in Latin America. Children and mothers are the central focus of their lives and of many of their writings. These writers have participated in essential ways in the history of their respective countries and in the intellectual history of Latin America, and at the same time, their greatest contribution has been in the sharing of the private details of personal stories, their own and others. In the strong connections that many of them have had with each other, Marjorie Agosin sees a culture of sisterhood. CONTENTS: INTRODUCTION - From a Room of One’s Own to the Garden by MARJORIE AGOSIN; Sofia Ospina de Navarro: Wise Advice from an Optimistic Grandmother by MARY G. BERG; Victoria Ocampo & Spiritual Energy by DORIS MEYER; Clementina Suárez: Poetry & Womanhood by JANET GOLD; The Creation of Alfonsina Storni by GWEN KIRKPATRICK; Gabriela Mistral: Language Is the Only Homeland by ELIZABETH HORAN; Violeta Parra: Singer of Life by INES DOLZ-BLACKBURN; Cecilia Ansaldo: Woman between the Private and Public Space by PATRICIA VARAS; Marta Traba: A Life of Images & Words by GLORIA BAUTISTA GUTIERREZ; Carmen Naranjo: From Poet to Minister by PATRICIA RUBI0; Rigoberta Menchá: The Art of Rebellion by MARY JANE TREACY; Julia de Burgos: Woman, Poet, Legend by CARMEN ESTEVES; Elena Poniatowska: Search for the Voiceless by KAY S. GARCIA; Delmira Agustini: Portraits & Reflections by RENÉE SCOTT; Clarice Lispector: Dreams of Language by GIOVANNI PONTIERO; Alejandra Pizarnik: The Self & Its Impossible Landscapes by ALICIA BORINSKY; Marosa Di Giorgio: Uruguay’s Sacred Poet of the Garden by TERESA PORZECANSKI; Notes; Bibliography. . MARJORIE AGOSIN, professor of Spanish and literature at Wellesley College, is the author of numerous volumes of poetry, short stories, and, most recently, A CROSS AND A STAR: MEMOIRS OF A JEWISH GIRL IN CHILE, also available from the University of New Mexico Press. . .

Marjorie Agosín (born June 15, 1955) is an award-winning poet, essayist, fiction writer, activist, and professor. She is a prolific author: her published books, including those she has written as well as those she has edited, number over eighty. Two of her recent books are both poetry collections, The Light of Desire / La Luz del Deseo, translated by Lori Marie Carlson (Swan Isle Press, 2009), and Secrets in the Sand: The Young Women of Juárez, translated by Celeste Kostopulos-Cooperman (White Pine Press, 2006), about the female homicides in Ciudad Juárez. She teaches Spanish language and Latin American literature at Wellesley College. She has won notability for her outspokenness for women's rights in Chile. The United Nations has honored her for her work on human rights. She also won many important literary awards. The Chilean government awarded her with the Gabriela Mistral Medal of Honor for Life Achievement in 2002. Agosín was born in 1955 to Moises and Frida Agosín in Chile, where she lived her childhood in a German community.
Agosin, Marjorie (editor). Landscapes of a New Land: Short Fiction By Latin American Women. Buffalo. 1989. White Pine Press. 0934834962. 194 pages. paperback. Cover painting by Emma Alvarez Pineiro.

This landmark collection rescues the voices of great women of Latin American letters, many of them distinguished in their own countries but largely unrecognized abroad. The stories of Landscapes of a New Land show the wide range of themes, images, and languages encountered in the new territories of the Latin American narrative written by women. The anthology contains over twenty stories from ten countries, including work by: Bombal; Valenzuela; Steimberg; Glantz; Riesco; Pinon; Lispector; Rendic; Fagundes by Telles; Bedregal; Balcells; Brunet; Bins; Ocampo; Araujo; Poniatowska; Orphee; Naranjo; Hilst; Peri-Rossi; Alonso. The themes of the stories are as eclectic as the natures of these women, ranging from stories exploring love and its mysteries to stories reflecting social/political concerns and reactions to authoritarian and repressive powers and to the magic-real stories which are characteristic of contemporary Latin American fiction. ‘From tenuous wisps of narrative to well-knit plots, from half by overheard reveries to public statements, and from the riddles of the sorceress to the good sense of seasoned women, Landscapes of a New Land brings together the variety of brief prose by contemporary Latin American women.’ - Naomi Lindstrom . . . ‘Perhaps because the short story lends itself to the brevity required of literature practiced during moments stolen from other non-literary activities, women writers in Latin America, often especially those vying for the attention routinely denied them, have been assiduous adherents of the short story genre. Bringing to the venerable genre of the short story remarkably original voices that confirm the vigor of Latin American narrative and the essential role women writers must now be recognized to play in it, writers like those brought together in this anthology constitute both allied and alternate strands of writing in Latin America. This anthology brings together figures well established both in English and Spanish, but it also accords appropriate recognition to authors whose writings have yet to attain international stature. It would be fitting if this anthology were able to do that through the medium of English.’ - David William Foster. CONTENTS: Introduction by Marjorie Agosin; GENEALOGIES by Sky, Sea and Earth by Maria Luisa Bombal (Chile); Genealogies by Margo Glantz (Mexico); DESTINATIONS by ‘Good Evening, Agatha’ by Yolanda Bedregal (Bolivia); An Avid One in Extremis by Hilda Hilst (Brazil); Natural Theology by Hilda Hilst (Brazil); Destination by Patricia Bins (Brazil); I Love My Husband by Nelida Pinon (Brazil; The Message by Elena Poniatowska (Mexico); The Key by Lygia Fagundes Telles (Brazil); Solitude of Blood by Marta Brunet (Chile); Plaza Maua by Clarice Lispector (Brazil); THE OPEN LETTER by The Open Letter by Helena Araujo (Colombia); Cecilia’s Last Will and Testament by Alicia Steimberg (Argentina); The Compulsive Couple of the House on the Hill by Carmen Naranjo (Costa Rica); The Snow White Guard by Luisa Valenzuela (Argentina); Cage Number One by Dora Alonso (Cuba); A CHILD, A DOG, THE NIGHT by Jimena’s Fair by Laura Riesco (Peru); A Child, a Dog, the Night by Amalia Rendic (Chile); The Enchanted Raisin by Jacqueline Balcells (Chile); THE BEGUILING LADIES by The Servant’s Slaves by Silvina Ocampo (Argentina); The Beguiling Ladies by Elvira Orphée (Argentina); The Museum of Futile Endeavors by Cristina Pen Rossi (Uruguay); Authors; Translators. . .

Marjorie Agosín (born June 15, 1955) is an award-winning poet, essayist, fiction writer, activist, and professor. She is a prolific author: her published books, including those she has written as well as those she has edited, number over eighty. Two of her recent books are both poetry collections, The Light of Desire / La Luz del Deseo, translated by Lori Marie Carlson (Swan Isle Press, 2009), and Secrets in the Sand: The Young Women of Juárez, translated by Celeste Kostopulos-Cooperman (White Pine Press, 2006), about the female homicides in Ciudad Juárez. She teaches Spanish language and Latin American literature at Wellesley College. She has won notability for her outspokenness for women's rights in Chile. The United Nations has honored her for her work on human rights. She also won many important literary awards. The Chilean government awarded her with the Gabriela Mistral Medal of Honor for Life Achievement in 2002. Agosín was born in 1955 to Moises and Frida Agosín in Chile, where she lived her childhood in a German community.
Agosin, Marjorie (editor). Secret Weavers: Stories of the Fantastic By Women of Argentina and Chile. Fredonia. 1992. White Pine Press. 1877727156. 339 pages. paperback. Book design by Watershed Design. The artwork used on the cover, 'Harmony, 1956', is by Spanish artist Remedios Varo.

The artwork used on the cover, ‘Harmony, 1956’, is by Spanish artist Remedios Varo. . Keywords: Literature Translated Latin America Women. ISBN: 1877727156. Fantastic literature, with its many classifications and variations such as magic-realism or the real-marvelous, has long been part of the Latin American critical imagination. Women writers have been a very important component of this genre, hut little attention has been paid to their particular tradition of fantastic literature, a tradition that continues to he produced and read today. This anthology traces the history of fantastic literature in Chile and Argentina and includes both the pioneer writers and the innovative and experimental xvriters of today. The stories, which represent the variety and complexity of this genre, include fairy tales, science fiction, and metaphorical political tales. The authors include: Isabel Allende; Olga Orozco; Maria Luisa Bomhal; Elvira Orphee; Alma Diaconu; Alejandra Pizarnik; Sara Gallardo; Cristina Pen Rossi; Marosa DiGiorgio; Ana Maria Shua; Angelica Gorodischer; Marcela Sola; Liliana Hecker; Alicia Steimherg; Luisa Mercedes Levinson; Elizabeth Suhercaseaux; Silvina Ocampo; Luisa Valenzuela. CONTENTS: Reflections on the Fantastic-Marjorie Agosin; COMPULSIVE DREAMERS - The Compulsive Dreamer-Silvina Ocampo; Things-Silvina Ocampo; The Velvet Dress-Silvina Ocampo; The House of Sugar-Silvina Ocampo; Thus Were Their Faces-Silvina Ocampo; The Story of Maria Griselda-Maria Luisa Bombal; The Little Island-Luisa Mercedes Levinson; The Boy Who Saw God’s Tears-Luisa Mercedes Levinson; AND THE WHEEL STILL SPINS - An Eternal Fear-Elvira Orphee; I Will Return, Mommy-Elvira Orpheè; How the Little Crocodiles Cry!-Elvira Orphee; For Friends and Enemies-Olga Orozco; And the Wheel Still Spins-Olga Orozco; THE WILD MIRRORS - The Mirror of Melancholy-Alejandra Pizarnik; Blood Baths-Alejandra Pizarnik; Severe Measures-Alejandra Piznarik; Excerpts from The Wild Papers-Marosa Di Giorgio; Excerpts from Dream Time-Ana Man a Shua; Other/Other-Ana Maria Shua; Fishing Days-Ana Maria Shua; The Man in the Araucaria-Sara Gallardo; The Blue Stone Emperor’s Thirty Wives-Sara Gallardo; INVISIBLE EMBROIDERY - The Condemned Dress in White-Marcela Sold; Happiness-Marcela Sold; Invisible Embroidery-Marcela Sold; The Storm-Alma Diaconu; Welcome to Albany-Alma Diaconu; The Widower-Alma Diaconu; Country Carnival-Luisa Valenzuela; Legend of the Self-Sufficient Child-Luisa Valenzuela; Viennese Waltz-Alicia Steimberg; Garcia’s Thousandth Day-Alicia Steimberg; Segismundo’s Better World-Alicia Steimberg; LETTERS - The Perfect Married Woman-Angelica Gorodischer; Letters From an English Lady-Angelica Gorodischer; Under the Flowering Ju1eps-Angelica Gorodischer; The Resurrection of the Flesh-Angelica Gorodischer; ANNUNCIATIONS - When Everything Shines-Liliana Hecker; The Annunciation-Cristina Pen Rossi; Selections from Silendra-Elizabeth Subercaseaux - Tapihue, Enedina, Juana, Silendra, Francisco; Two Words-Isabel Allende; The Authors; The Translators. . .

Marjorie Agosín (born June 15, 1955) is an award-winning poet, essayist, fiction writer, activist, and professor. She is a prolific author: her published books, including those she has written as well as those she has edited, number over eighty. Two of her recent books are both poetry collections, The Light of Desire / La Luz del Deseo, translated by Lori Marie Carlson (Swan Isle Press, 2009), and Secrets in the Sand: The Young Women of Juárez, translated by Celeste Kostopulos-Cooperman (White Pine Press, 2006), about the female homicides in Ciudad Juárez. She teaches Spanish language and Latin American literature at Wellesley College. She has won notability for her outspokenness for women's rights in Chile. The United Nations has honored her for her work on human rights. She also won many important literary awards. The Chilean government awarded her with the Gabriela Mistral Medal of Honor for Life Achievement in 2002. Agosín was born in 1955 to Moises and Frida Agosín in Chile, where she lived her childhood in a German community.
Agosin, Marjorie and Franzen, Cola (editors). The Renewal of the Vision: Voices of Latin American Women Poets 1940-1980. Peterborough. 1987. Spectacular Diseases. 0946904073. 1 Of 750 Copies. 113 pages. paperback.

The male writer in Latin America has often played a double role, as writer and as voice for the silent and sometimes colonized masses of the continent. Writers such as César Vallejo of Peru, Pablo Neruda of Chile, Ernesto Cardenal of Nicaragua, were all men of letters, and all Marxists who were deeply involved in the social and political events of their respective countries. Vallejo and Neruda were both activists on behalf of the Spanish Republic during the Spanish Civil War, showing that their political concerns did not stop at their own borders. And now comes an interesting question. What about the marginal half of the population who are women? Who among the men writers, so concerned with speaking for and aiding the oppressed elements of the society, has recognized women as being part of the oppressed? The answer is not a single one. It seems astounding, but if we go by the writing, we have to conclude that the men writers never realized that women, even those closest to them, their own mothers and wives, sisters and daughters, inhabited a shadow world apart from the main current of society. They seem never to have suspected the existence of the hidden, silent intra-history of women’s lives. It is only women writers themselves who have talked about this other world, and have undertaken, since time immemorial, to be heard and to describe the parameters of their special situation. If we examine a number of anthologies of Hispanic poetry we find that on the average one woman is represented for every ten men. In anthologies of translations, the situation is even worse. The present anthology has been inspired by earlier models and owes a great debt to the first bilingual anthology edited by Nora Weizer, Open to the Sun, Perivale Press, Calif, 1978, and the very recent anthology edited by Mary Crow, Women Who Have Sprouted Wings (LALR Press, Pittsburgh, 1984). Weizer’s anthology incorporates traditional voices such as Alfonsina Storni and Mistral; Crow’s collection leans toward new voices but includes a range of writers and periods. Our anthology begins with the year 1940, an important year for Latin American women writers. First of all, it was that year that literary work of women in all genres began to be known to a wider audience than had been accorded them before and in addition, a number of outstanding women writers were horn that year. This anthology aims to be eclectic and to include writers of various regions and styles. For example we have included texts of the Guatemalan writer Alaide Foppa who is best known as an essayist and literary critic, although she has an important body of poetical works to her credit. We have tried to give some special visibility to some poets from Central America who have been so often overlooked, poets such as Eunice Odio of Costa Rica for example; and we have included Julia Alvarez from the Dominican Republic who now lives in New York and writes in English. We believe that an important component of our anthology is that we have included women of various cultural backgrounds hut who write out of their Hispanic heritage, some from their present homes in the United States. This is the case of Rosario Morales of Puerto Rico and Cecilia Vicuna who lives in New York but is still Chilean to the core. In selecting the poems for the Anthology, we tried to pick those that would show the widest range possible of themes, images, styles and techniques, to cover as far as we could the main concerns of women’s lives as revealed in their poetry. We found that certain motifs tended to recur over and over like a hell tolling as women grapple with their destiny as women. Here is Rosario Castellanos in ‘Destiny: Someone hurled me onto this hard ground,! Someone said: Let’s drink her blood! and make a banquet of her hones. And here is Alaide Foppa in ‘Woman’: A being! who has not yet become.,,! Not the remote! angelical rose! that the poets elegized.! Not the evil witch! that the inquisitors burned, Another ye important element that appears in these poems is evidence of a search for an authentic language, a personal language with images that reflect the lives of women, their bodies, their duties, and beyond the words and images, we mean a special use of the language. For example, in ‘The Supplicant’ by the Uruguayan poet, Cristina Peri Rossi, the erotic, sensual quality of the poet comes out when she says: ‘Undress me! Speak me,’ Within this search for a new language, we find some radical experimentation as in the poetry of Alejandra Pizarnik, Consider the example, her poem ‘Signs’: Everything makes love with silence.! They had promised me a silence! like fire, a house of silence,! Suddenly the temple is a circus and! the light, a drum. There is also an audacious and rebellious kind of experimentation in the poems of Cecilia Vicuña, as in ‘Solitude’: We would lose more than half! of our Union! if I stop being! your friend! Do you want to make me see the sky?! Touch that white! space! between my thighs. These few examples show some of the variation of themes and ways of expressing present to this volume, but there is never any doubt that we are listening to women’s voices: women speaking out as independent persons, no longer condemned to the role of virginal poetress writing sentimental scribbles in a back room. The women in this anthology are creative, original, each one determined to write her own text that will be true to her own life, and to all her interests and concerns. These women are not writing as self-absorbed creatures; they have not forgotten others who are oppressed, as we see most clearly in the poems of Violeta Parra and Ana Castillo. Here are real women, strong women, women being themselves, not witches, no longer appendages, no longer shadows. They are no longer exiles from the realm of words; like any good artisan, they carry the words they need with them. CONTENTS: INDEX; Introduction to the Anthology of Latin American Women Poets by Marjorie Agosin and Cola Franzen; Julia Alvarez; Alicia Borinsky; Cecilia Bustamante; Rosario Castellanos; Ana Castillo; Belkis Cuza Male; Myriam Diaz-Diocaretz; Delia Dominguez; Rosario Ferro; Alaide Foppa; Isabel Fraire; Luisa Futoransky; Rosita Kalina; Rosario Morales; Nancy Morejón; Eunice Odio; Violeta Parra; Cristina Pen Rossi; Elejandra Pizarnik; Adélia Prado; Luz Maria Umpierre; Blanca Varela; Cecilia Vicuña; Contributors.

Marjorie Agosín (born June 15, 1955) is an award-winning poet, essayist, fiction writer, activist, and professor. She is a prolific author: her published books, including those she has written as well as those she has edited, number over eighty. Two of her recent books are both poetry collections, The Light of Desire / La Luz del Deseo, translated by Lori Marie Carlson (Swan Isle Press, 2009), and Secrets in the Sand: The Young Women of Juárez, translated by Celeste Kostopulos-Cooperman (White Pine Press, 2006), about the female homicides in Ciudad Juárez. She teaches Spanish language and Latin American literature at Wellesley College. She has won notability for her outspokenness for women's rights in Chile. The United Nations has honored her for her work on human rights. She also won many important literary awards. The Chilean government awarded her with the Gabriela Mistral Medal of Honor for Life Achievement in 2002. Agosín was born in 1955 to Moises and Frida Agosín in Chile, where she lived her childhood in a German community. Cola Franzen (February 4, 1923 – April 5, 2018) was an American writer and translator. She published more than twenty books of translations, by notable Spanish and Latin American authors. She was a member of ALTA (American Literary Translators Association) and vice-president of Language Research, Inc., founded by I.A. Richards, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Her work has appeared in Two Lines, Puerto del sol, Temblor, New American Writing.
Agosin, Marjorie. Happiness. Fredonia. 1993. White Pine Press. 1877727342. Translated from the Spanish by Elizabeth Horan. 237 pages. paperback. Cover Art (c) 1993 by Heteo Perez. Book design by Watershed Design.

A collection of disturbing and beautiful stories from the noted Chilean poet and human rights activist. This is the first collections of her fiction to be published in English. ‘Pork Sausages’ first appeared in Americas Magazine, ‘An Immense Black umbrella’ first appeared in WHEN ANGELS GLIDE AT DAWN (Harper Collins, 1991), and ‘Prairies’ and ‘The Gold Bracelet’ first appeared in the Agni Review. CONTENTS: INTRODUCTION; Prelude to a Literary Alliance - Elizabeth Horan; HAPPINESS - Slaves; Happiness; Fat; Braids; An Immense Black Umbrella; Adelina; Nana; Monserrat Ordonez; Emma; Wax Candles; THE FIESTA - Gypsy Women; North; Photographs; The Gold Bracelet; The Fiesta; Orphanages; The Seamstress from Saint Petersberg; The Eiderdown; Pisagua; The Hen; Pork Sausages; Itinerants; Water; Signs of Love; SIGNS OF LOVE - Love Letters; First Time to the Sea; Mirrors; Meditation on the Dead; Rio de la Plata; FORESTS - Blood; journey to the End of Coasts; Forests; Beds; Cartographies; The Dead; The Rubber Tree; LONG LIVE LIFE - Long Live Life; Prairies; Sargasso; Rivers; Distant Root of Autumn Loves; Naked; Houses by the Sea; The Dreams of Van Gogh.

Marjorie Agosín (born June 15, 1955) is an award-winning poet, essayist, fiction writer, activist, and professor. She is a prolific author: her published books, including those she has written as well as those she has edited, number over eighty. Two of her recent books are both poetry collections, The Light of Desire / La Luz del Deseo, translated by Lori Marie Carlson (Swan Isle Press, 2009), and Secrets in the Sand: The Young Women of Juárez, translated by Celeste Kostopulos-Cooperman (White Pine Press, 2006), about the female homicides in Ciudad Juárez. She teaches Spanish language and Latin American literature at Wellesley College. She has won notability for her outspokenness for women's rights in Chile. The United Nations has honored her for her work on human rights. She also won many important literary awards. The Chilean government awarded her with the Gabriela Mistral Medal of Honor for Life Achievement in 2002. Agosín was born in 1955 to Moises and Frida Agosín in Chile, where she lived her childhood in a German community.
Agosin, Marjorie. Sargasso. Fredonia. 1993. White Pine Press. 187772727x. Translated from the Spanish by Cola Franzen. 91 pages. paperback. Cover art by Heteo Perez

The poems in this collection by critically-acclaimed Chilean poet, editor, and human rights activist Marjorie Agosin reflect her deep-rooted passion for nature, for life, and for being. Agosin creates a world where everything touches the sea and is, in turn, touched by it - a simple world where when her son is born she asks for ‘a flower, a light, a glass of water.’ From the child who ‘discovers the sky’ in water to a young couple who promised to be ‘a single branch of water, one single stream,’ to the old women ‘making their way toward the sea. . . to dissolve in the beat of the waves,’ Agosin fills her world with people who ‘carry the scents of the river and the sign of water.’ CONTENTS: From OUTCROP OF WATER/UN ROQUERIO DE AGUA - Presencia/Presence; Me supe sabia/I knew myself wise; Tocando el cielo/Touching the Sky; Puertos/Ports; Extranjeria/Alien; Vejeces/Growing Old; Las damas del océano/The Seaside Ladies; Demencias/Madness; Idiomas/Idioms; Huérfanas/Orphan Girls; Fronteras/Frontiers; Visperas/Evenings; Siete piedras/Seven Stones; La ballena/The Whale; Delfines/Dolphins; Peces/Fish; Las algas del océano/Ocean Algae; Extranezas/Strange Places; Adivinanzas/Sorcery; Sargazos/Sargasso Fields; From ISLANDS/ISIAS - Una mujer duerme en una isla/A Woman Sleeps on an Island; Nupcialidades/Nuptials; Abanicos/Fans; Raices/Roots; Aromas/Aromas; Sueno/Dream; Retornos/Return; Los tatuajes del amor/Tattoos of Love; Piedra/Stone; Espejos/Mirrors; La casa junto al mar/The House by the Sea; Lenguaje/Language; Faldas acuosas/Watery Skirts; Zambullida/Plunge; Canción/Song; Caridad/Charity; Sonidos/Sounds; Estanques/Pools; Cuando José Daniel sueña/When José Daniel Dreams.

Marjorie Agosín (born June 15, 1955) is an award-winning poet, essayist, fiction writer, activist, and professor. She is a prolific author: her published books, including those she has written as well as those she has edited, number over eighty. Two of her recent books are both poetry collections, The Light of Desire / La Luz del Deseo, translated by Lori Marie Carlson (Swan Isle Press, 2009), and Secrets in the Sand: The Young Women of Juárez, translated by Celeste Kostopulos-Cooperman (White Pine Press, 2006), about the female homicides in Ciudad Juárez. She teaches Spanish language and Latin American literature at Wellesley College. She has won notability for her outspokenness for women's rights in Chile. The United Nations has honored her for her work on human rights. She also won many important literary awards. The Chilean government awarded her with the Gabriela Mistral Medal of Honor for Life Achievement in 2002. Agosín was born in 1955 to Moises and Frida Agosín in Chile, where she lived her childhood in a German community.
Agosin, Marjorie. Women of Smoke. Pittsburgh. 1988. Latin American Literary Review Press. 093548034x. Translated from the Spanish by Naomi Lindstrom. 115 pages. paperback. Cover and photograph by Paz Errazuriz.

A collection of poetry from the gifted Chilean poet. Her themes are contemporary and explore feminine sensibilities. CONTENTS: Preface by Carmen Naranjo; Mujeres de humo/Women of Smoke; Ella/She; La amortajada/The Shrouded Woman; Uxmal/Uxmal; La pajarera/The Bird Vendor; Marinas/Seagoings; Vidrios/Glass; Meditación ante un espejo/Meditation in a Mirror; Ante el espejo una mujer se peina los cabellos/A Woman Combs Her Hair Before the Mirror; Arreglos florales/Floral Arrangements; El amor y la calavera/Love and the Death’s Head; Amas de casa/Housewives; Insomnia/Insomnia; Iluminada/woman Aglow; La condenada/Woman Sentenced to Death; A Laura Riesco/To Laura Riesco; La mendiga/The Beggar Woman; Sola/Alone; La reina/The Queen; En Chile, en las Gitanas/In Chile, Gypsy Woman; Mujeres fábulas y yo/Women of Legend and I; Ariadna/Ariadne; Penelope II/Penelope II; Hechicerias/Witchcraft; Salem/Salem; Perdida/Lost Woman; Recordar/Remembering; Mudas/Silent Women; Vagabundas/Homeless Women; La ahorcada/The Woman Hanged; La Suicida/The Suicide; Virginia/Virginia; Primer parto/First Birth; Dia de playa/A Day at the Beach; Moteles/Motels; El jardin de las delicias/The Garden of Delights; Diciembre/December; Desnudez/Nakedness; Aguel hombre que me hizo escribir mi primer/That Man Who Made Me Write My First; Los paises del humo/The Lands of Smoke.

Marjorie Agosín (born June 15, 1955) is an award-winning poet, essayist, fiction writer, activist, and professor. She is a prolific author: her published books, including those she has written as well as those she has edited, number over eighty. Two of her recent books are both poetry collections, The Light of Desire / La Luz del Deseo, translated by Lori Marie Carlson (Swan Isle Press, 2009), and Secrets in the Sand: The Young Women of Juárez, translated by Celeste Kostopulos-Cooperman (White Pine Press, 2006), about the female homicides in Ciudad Juárez. She teaches Spanish language and Latin American literature at Wellesley College. She has won notability for her outspokenness for women's rights in Chile. The United Nations has honored her for her work on human rights. She also won many important literary awards. The Chilean government awarded her with the Gabriela Mistral Medal of Honor for Life Achievement in 2002. Agosín was born in 1955 to Moises and Frida Agosín in Chile, where she lived her childhood in a German community.
Agosin, Marjorie. Zones of Pain/Las Zonas Del Dolor. Fredonia. 1988. White Pine Press. 0934834385. Translated from the Spanish by Cola Franzen. 72 pages. paperback. Design by Watershed Design.

There are voices that, in exile, continue to give testimony and to speak for those who are silenced by imprisonment, torture, and death. Marjorie Agosin’s is one of those voices. Theoretically it would have been possible, in physical safety, for her to have written only of her own life in this country; but in fact, as her work makes evident, her identity is hound up with those for whom and of whom her poems speak to us-as she says, ‘they all wake me up at night to ask me not to forget them.’ Her words demand of us that we too do not forget.’ - Denise Levertov. . . ‘Her poetry vibrates with electricity and compassion for those who cannot speak for themselves. She captures the soul of the lost and helpless. Her Anne Frank poems are among the best I’ve read!’ - Liv Ullmann. . . ‘Marjorie Agosin is gifted with a sensibility at once poetic and political. She dams to write of the world as she dares to experience it: a female human being in touch with the anguish-and the indomitable spirit-of women in her native Chile, and indeed, of women everywhere. What is more, she even dams to sing in the face of death. Cola Franzen’s sensitive translations into English do Agosin justice, and make of this bilingual edition of poems a treasure.’ - Robin Morgan. . . ‘With courage and tenderness Marjorie Agosin dives into ZONES OF PAIN in order to speak through the mouths of women whose voices, tongues, lives have been wrested from them. In these poems solidarity assumes the lacerating form of identification.’ - Luisa Valenzuela. . . ‘The almost hallucinatory poems of Zones of Pain am grounded in the grimness of real-life events in Chile deaths, torture, disappearances, dismemberments) but Marjorie Agosin has known how to mediate gruesome reality through poetry in such a way as to move the reader far more deeply than could any mere catalog of horrors. I know no literary texts in which the fear of suffering and the elegiac celebration of the Chilean dead have been quite so disturbingly intertwined: distanced yet heartrendingly involved, these poems are the more frightening for their subtle exploration of an inner landscape which we yet know to he the world she has escaped.’ - Robert Bring-Mill. CONTENTS: Introduction; Prologo/Prologue; Tras el alba/Beyond the dawn; LAS ZONAS DEL DOLOR I/ZONES OF PAIN I; LAS ZONAS DEL DOLOR II/ZONES OF PAIN II; LA MANO/THE HAND; Lo más increible/The most unbelievable part; LA TORTURA/TORTURE; EL DIOS DE LOS NINOS/THE GOD OF CHILDREN; LA AMORDAZADA/THE SHROUDED WOMAN; ANA FRANK Y NOSOTRAS/ANNE FRANK AND US; Podriamos haber sido ella/Could we have been her; LA DESAPARECIDA I/DISAPPEARED WOMAN I; LA DESAPARECIDA II/DISAPPEARED WOMAN II; LA DESAPARECIDA III/DISAPPEARED WOMAN III; LA DESAPARECIDA IV/DISAPPEARED WOMAN IV; LA DESAPARECIDA V/DISAPPEARED WOMAN V; LA DESAPARECIDA VI/DISAPPEARED WOMAN VI; MEMORIAL DE LAS LOCAS EN LA PLAZA DE MAYO/REMEMBERING THE MADWOMEN OF THE PLAZA DE MAYO; DELANTALES DE HUMO/APRONS OF SMOKE; DESNUDAS EN LOS BOSQUES DE ALAMBRE/NAKED GIRLS IN THE FORESTS OF BARBED WIRE; LAS PIEZAS OSCURAS/THE DARK ROOMS; COMO VE UNA PRISIONERA LA LUZ?/HOW DOES AN IMPRISONED WOMAN SEE THE LIGHT?; LA PRISIONERA Y LA LUZ I/THE CAPTIVE WOMAN AND THE LIGHT I; LA PRISIONERA I LA LUZ II/THE CAPTIVE WOMAN AND THE LIGHT II; PUPILAS/PUPILS; LOS OJOS DE LOS ENTERRADOS/THE EYES OF THE INTERRED; QUE HAY EN EL FONDO DE TUS 0JOS?/WHAT LIES IN THE DEPTHS OF YOUR EYES?; DESDE LA CELDA PERFILO EL RASTRO/FROM THE CELL I OUTLINE THE TRACE; ENTRE LOS PINOS/AMONG THE PINES; La sangre es un nido/The blood is a nest; Más que la paz/More than peace; Nos acogio/We were met.

Marjorie Agosín (born June 15, 1955) is an award-winning poet, essayist, fiction writer, activist, and professor. She is a prolific author: her published books, including those she has written as well as those she has edited, number over eighty. Two of her recent books are both poetry collections, The Light of Desire / La Luz del Deseo, translated by Lori Marie Carlson (Swan Isle Press, 2009), and Secrets in the Sand: The Young Women of Juárez, translated by Celeste Kostopulos-Cooperman (White Pine Press, 2006), about the female homicides in Ciudad Juárez. She teaches Spanish language and Latin American literature at Wellesley College. She has won notability for her outspokenness for women's rights in Chile. The United Nations has honored her for her work on human rights. She also won many important literary awards. The Chilean government awarded her with the Gabriela Mistral Medal of Honor for Life Achievement in 2002. Agosín was born in 1955 to Moises and Frida Agosín in Chile, where she lived her childhood in a German community.
Agueros, Jack. Dominoes & Other Stories From the Puerto Rican. Willimantic. 1993. Curbstone Press. 188068411x. 149 pages. hardcover.

‘A wonderful collection of stories — full of the particulars of a people’s encounter with America, told with persuasive grace, charm, [and] honesty. . .’ - Robert Coles. DOMINOES & OTHER STORIES FROM THE PUERTO RICAN, the long-awaited debut collection of the fiction of playright and poet Jack Agueros, is a unique window on the untold stories of the lives of Puerto Rican-Americans. With a phenomenal richness of detail, Jack Agueros brings the reality of Puerto Rican experience in New York fully to life. In stories that span the decades of the 1940s through 1990s he recreates the barrio in all its multi-faceted immensity, with its candy stores, plaster saints, numbers collectors, tropical fruit vendors and sidewalk games of dominoes, its knife fights and junkies’ raps and its successful stories of craftsmen and entrepeneurs. These stories convey hard, sometimes brutal, often bittersweet experiences, but throughout, Jack Agueros writes with artistry and unyielding compassion that gloriously affirm quiet moments of grace and triumph in common and ordinary struggles—the real stuff of literature. ‘I don’t like the way Latinos often get portrayed. The lives of working people are unheard from because it’s hard to write about them. But those lives are frequently heroic and have their drama, too. I’m also interested in what happens to them.’ — Jack Agueros. Jack Agueros was born in New York City in 1934. Recipient of numerous awards, he has published poetry, plays and children’s stories, and has written works broadcast on television, notably for Sesame Street and WNBC-TV Channel 4. For almost ten years he was director of the Museo del Barrio in East Harlem, the only Puerto Rican Museum in the U.S. .

Jack Agüeros (September 2, 1934 – May 4, 2014) was an American community activist, poet, writer, and translator, and the former director of El Museo del Barrio.
Aguilar Garcia, Eduardo. Boulevard of Heroes. Pittsburgh. 1993. Latin American Literary Review Press. 0935480625. Translated from the Spanish by Jay Anthony Miskowiec. 192 pages. paperback. Cover illustration - 'Las Flores del Golgota' by Marco Tulio Lamoyi.

Petronio Rincon is the son of an assassinated politician and the follower of a revolutionary priest. As a youth, he organizes the masses to incite the residents of a poor neighborhood. A decade later, the untamed and ritualistic jungle becomes Petronio’s habitat. Overthrown by his avaricious troops and exiled by the government, Petronio then lands in Paris, where he is forcibly interned in a hospital and suffers from insomnia and nightmares. One evening, he chances upon a stone staircase that spirals him into the bowels of the city, beginning a Dantesque experience plagued with nameless tortures and horrors. Near the end of the novel, Petronio encounters-in a cabaret-the withered figure of Simon Bolivar in a twist of fate that changes the novel’s infernal mood. In the tradition of magic realism, Boulevard of Heroes blends the fantastic and the logical to create a lucid commentary of utopian failure, expertly translated by Jay Anthony Miskowiec and with an introduction by internationally renowned translator Gregory Rabassa.

EDUARDO GARCIA AGUILAR was born in the Andean city of Manizales, Colombia, in 1953. He has published three novels, three collections of short stories and two books of poetry. Mr. Aguilar has been Central American correspondent for Excelsior, Unomasuno and El Periodico de Mexico. Since 1980 he has been pursuing his writing career in Mexico City, where he is at present Associate Director of Agence France Press. JAY ANTHONY MISKOWIEC received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the City University of New York. He is currently an Assistant Professor of English at Hamline University in Saint Paul.
Aguilar, Luis E. (editor). Marxism in Latin America. New York. 1968. Knopf. 272 pages. hardcover.

Marxism in Latin America is too complex a subject to be examined fully within the confines of a single anthology. As in many other areas of Latin American culture, Marxist productions are scattered through a multitude of articles and pamphlets, often ephemeral, and sometimes impossible to locate. Until a very short time ago, for example, it was an arduous job to find the basic works of José Carlos Mariategui or Luis Emiho Recabarren, even in Peru or Chile. In this anthology, in order to present important portions of the diverse facets of Marxism in Latin America - from the first socialist sprouts to contemporary Communist self-criticism - the author has sought to go beyond the usual limits of those authors who are most widely known. Included are a number of Trotskyite and ex-Communist authors. Although as broad a picture as possible has been offered, for reasons of space examples of only the most typical cases and the most important parties have been included.

Luis Enrique Aguilar Leon, J.D., Ph.D. (1926 in Manzanillo, Cuba - 5 January 2008 in Key Biscayne, Florida, United States) was a Cuban journalist, professor and historian. He was a professor to Bill Clinton and a classmate of Fidel Castro. Aguilar was educated by the Jesuits first at the Colegio de Dolores in Santiago de Cuba and then at the Colegio de Belen in Havana. Fidel Castro was his classmate at both schools. They both graduated in 1944 from Belen. Aguilar graduated from the University of Havana Law School in 1949 and Castro in 1950. In 1950, Aguilar earned a degree in international relations from the Complutense University of Madrid in Spain. Later, while in exile, he would earn a Ph.D. from American University in Washington, D.C. When he returned from Spain, he taught for a time at the Universidad de Oriente - Santiago de Cuba, but then went to Havana to practice law. He was also a political writer for the newspaper Prensa Libre and the magazines Bohemia and Carteles. Aguilar was also the director of Universidad del Aire (University of the Air) on the radio network CMQ. He was one of the founders of the Christian Democrat movement, which was banned once Castro took power. In 1960, Aguilar wrote an article entitled It’s Time for Unanimity which was a denunciation of censorship in Cuba. The Committee of Revolutionary Freedom flagged the article and requested that the government execute Aguilar. He then went into exile. Aguilar was a professor at Columbia University, Cornell University and finally for three decades at Georgetown University. Bill Clinton was one of his students. He retired from Georgetown in 1992 with the title professor emeritus. In 2003, Georgetown University created a scholarship named after him. Aguilar then moved to South Florida and taught at the University of Miami until 2002. In 1988, he founded the Emilio Bacardi Moreau Chair on Cuban Studies at the University of Miami. He was involved with Radio Marti since its inception in 1985 and was the Director of the Opinion Section of El Nuevo Herald from 1993 to 1995. Aguilar suffered the last years of his life with Alzheimer’s disease. He died on January 5, 2008 in his home at Key Biscayne, Florida.
Aguilera-Malta, Demetrio. Babelandia. Clifton. 1985. Humana Press. 0896030652. Illustrated by George Bartko. Translated from the Spanish by Peter Earle. 375 pages. hardcover. Cover art by George Bartko

BABELANDIA is Demetrio Aguilera-Malta’s wildly surreal, extravagantly comical story of the kidnapping of the corrupt and brutal General Jonas Pithecanthropus, chief military officer of an archetypal Latin-American dictatorship as monstrously deformed by its political and military authoritarianisms as any Orwell or Swift might imagine. Pithecanthropus, the General in question, is here truly an ape-man-murderously barbaric as an officer, savagely macho as a lover, but helplessly simian when confronting the ape-ambrosia of a banana. His kidnapping by a nonviolent but revolutionary band of guerrillas precipitates a terrible crisis among the leaders of Babelandia, who are opposed by: Captain Gleam, the equally archetypal embodiment of all good, a superman among the insurrectionists; The Amautas, the rebels who have taken their name from a mysterious tribe of ancient Incan sages, and who hold Pithy prisoner in the caldera of an extinct volcano; Theophilus Bright, a magic volcano-priest who reconciles nature, holiness, and prime causality in his cheshire-like manifestations and dematerializations; and of course the Party of Perpetual Opposition. As the tale unravels, we meet: Holofernes Verbophile, Babelandia’s skeleton-dictator who disperses his bones at will, and harangues the people only via cassette; Wiley Warhorse, the Secretary of Defense who is often transmogrified directly into General Pithecanthropus’ cavalry mount; Bacchus the Groveler, the obsequious Secretary of State, who hosts Lucullan feasts at the Embassy of Great Entanglements; Maria, Captain Gleam’s unreachable love, who is as pure and virtuous (almost) as her Biblical namesake; Harpitune, Holofernes’ wife, who lives in coiling, sinister embrace with the boa con- strictor, Melopea, and searches fruitlessly for her lost son, the poet Sinbad; Father Polygamo, whose unholy sexual organ grows continually-wreaking havoc among all the women of Labyinthia - eventually to be buried in a coffin beside Polygamo’s own, from whence it soon rises-transformed and beatific; Ludivina, a young woman tormented and defiled by Polygamo’s unholy tendril, who eventually dies giving birth to a sulfurous green offspring, perhaps the devil himself; Doña Prudencia, Ludivina’s vulturous dueña, who cannot in the end save her; Eneas Pioneer, Gleam’s close friend, tipsy organist, and failed suitor of Ludivina; Piggy Rigoletto, the Secretary of the Interior, who plunders Babelandia’s resources and commands 50,000 serpents in the search for the kidnapped Pithy; Voracia, Piggy’s wife, who literally gobbles money while fantasizing the goods it could purchase; Narcissus Vaselino, the Chief of Protocol who behaves as slimily as his name suggests with; Disgusteaux, the imported Parisian chef; Pepita San Toro, who wears men down to the nub of widowhood several times over; Spongy Sumptuoso, owner of Babelandia’s ‘elitiest’ nightclub, where Pithecanthropus was to have been feted by ambassadors from around the world; Rory Notorioso, the investigative reporter who discovers and reveals Pithy’s shameful family secrets; And many others whose painful but mordantly comic exertions continually enrich the tale. In this harsh but often hilarious grotesquerie, Demetrio Aguilera-Malta has created a timeless satire of a nightmarish world-a confused and horrifying Babel reincarnate-where all power gives way to brutal authoritarianism, where every coarse desire is monstrously realized, where the ultimate triumph of the forces of good emerges all too slowly. No one will soon forget the enduring gallery of felons and degenerates, of pure and virtuous revolutionary paladins, of follies and corruptions and deliverances that is so entertainingly portrayed here, in BABELANDIA - this hell driven, Rabelaision, but ultimately redeemable universe that overwhelmingly mirrors our own hearts and lives. . Widely acknowledged to be one of the brilliant pioneers of magic realism-the phantasmagorical style that uniquely characterizes so much of contemporary Latin American literature-Demetrio Aguilera-Malta, the legendary Ecuadorean writer, has in recent years begun to receive the long overdue attention and enthusiastic readership in the English-speaking world that his work so greatly deserves. The highly regarded translator, Gregory Rabassa, not long ago published a distinguished version of the author’s fantastic novel from the 1960s, SEVEN MOONS AND SEVEN SERPENTS, and John and Carolyn Brushwood have also produced an equally striking version of DON GOYO (Humana Press), the author’s classic and timeless first novel from the 1930s.

Demetrio Aguilera-Malta (May 24, 1909, Guayaquil, Ecuador - December 28, 1981, Mexico City, Mexico) was a poet, essayist, and foreign correspondent; he wrote and directed films; he taught in several universities in the United States and elsewhere; he painted vigorously; and always he wrote novels of astonishing power, moral and social consciousness, and radical inventiveness.
Aguilera-Malta, Demetrio. Don Goyo. Clifton. 1980. Humana Press. 0896030199. Illustrated by George Bartko. Translated from the Spanish by John & Carolyn Brushwood. 200 pages. hardcover. Cover art by George Bartko

DON GOYO is the magnificently sensual and vital first novel of the legendary Ecuadorean writer, Demetrio Aguilera-Malta. Its setting is an island community of cholo fisherfolk and mangrove cutters near Guayaquil, Ecuador. The book opens by relating the adventures of Cusumbo, a young cholo who journeys from the primitive freedom and easy dignity of his youth on a hacienda into knowledge of his father’s broken rage at perpetual debt and peonage, a rage that soon leads to the murder of Cusumbo’s mother. The story follows the neophyte’s amusing sexual explorations, his increasing despair and bondage at the hacienda, where he has inherited his father’s debts, his cuckolding by the white owner and subsequent revenge murder of his wife, his new life as a fisherman, his absurd and painful encounters with the whores of the big city, and his eventual learning to be a mangrove cutter because that alone will win him a new wife. Although Cusumbo leads a primal and sensuous life, Don Goyo, the 150-year-old patriarch whose enormous vigor and wisdom is fabled among the islanders now lives in a world of hallucinatory communion with the waters, the creatures of the sea, and above all the ancient mangroves. In a powerful vision, the trees speak to him of their brotherhood with the island people, and ask that Don Goyo prevent their destruction. Don Goyo’s moral authority leads his people for a time away from the culling of the mangroves - and the obliteration of their way of life that this will inevitably bring. But they soon discover they can no longer survive from fishing alone, and when they seek out Don Goyo to tell him of their decision to return to cutting, he has already journeyed deep among the mangroves, to die transcendently even as the oldest and greatest of the trees falls nearby. Beautifully translated by John and Carolyn Brushwood and powerfully illustrated by George Bartko, Don Goyo proclaims itself clearly as a great early classic of the magic realism that has flowered so richly in modern Latin-American literature. DON GOYO is an archetypal work steeped in the anguish, joy, brutality, and wanton passion of life in a world beginning to be devoured into modern civilization, illuminating with its prodigal and harsh lyricism a process that confronts our humanity with its heartbreaking social convulsions everywhere today.

DEMETRIO AGUILERA-MALTA ((May 24, 1909, Guayaquil, Ecuador - December 28, 1981, Mexico City, Mexico), born in turn-of-the-century Ecuador, is a poet, playwright, essayist and novelist. Now recognized as one of the major literary influences in Latin America. Aguilera-Malta made a vital contribution to the development of ‘magical realism’, a creative blend of fantasy and myth, imbued with the vision of social and political turmoil. In the 1930s, he was one of the Ecuadorian writers who formed the Grupo de Guayaquil to further social change. His early works were judged crude and violent, but they were a turning point in Ecuadorian literature and have had an obvious impact on younger Latin American writers such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez. SEVEN SERPENTS AND SEVEN MOONS was first published in Mexico in 1970 and later in Spain and Italy. His other novels translated into English include MARCIELA (1967) and DON GOYO (1979).
Aguilera-Malta, Demetrio. Manuela. Carbondale. 1967. Southern Illinois University Press. Translated from the Spanish by Willis Knapp Jones. 304 pages. hardcover. JACKET DESIGN BY H. LAWRENCE HOFFMAN

Simon Bolivar (1783-1830), liberator of the countries now known as Peru, Ecuador, Boliva, Columbia, and Venezuela, inspired the present work, which is the first of a series of historical novels, Episodios Americanos, by the Ecuadorian author Demetrio Aguilera Malta. Now the story of Bolivar, the mighty warrior and eloquent statesman, and the woman who inspired him is made available to North American readers in Willis Knapp Jones’s sensitive translation of Manuela (La caballeresa del sol). ‘Caballeresa’ in the novel’s Spanish title refers to Manuela Sáenz, the beautiful woman who fell in love with Bolivar and helped him accomplish his dream of independence for the Spanish American colonies. Even before she met Bolivar, Manuela had received the Peruvian decoration of a ‘caballeresa del sol’ (the feminine counterpart of the masculine ‘caballero del sol’) for her efforts in lower Peru’s struggle for independence, and she was thereafter known by the epithet ‘Lady of the Sun.’ Indeed, as she worked among all classes of society to win financial and political backing for Bolivar, she proved to be a fiery lady. Sustained and fortified by the devotion of Manuela Sáenz, Bolivar had the ability to inspire his followers, not only with his presence but with his ideals. An historical novel seldom displays the emotional verve that Manuela does, nor follows actual events as accurately as does this story of Simon Bolivar and Manuela Sáenz, lovers caught in the fortunes and misfortunes of South American war and political upheaval. Students of Spanish American history and literature will enjoy the factual development in the story; students of the drama and the novel will appreciate the dramatic and poetic presentation.

DEMETRIO AGUILERA-MALTA (May 24, 1909, Guayaquil, Ecuador - December 28, 1981, Mexico City, Mexico), born in turn-of-the-century Ecuador, was a poet, playwright, essayist and novelist. Now recognized as one of the major literary influences in Latin America. Aguilera-Malta made a vital contribution to the development of ‘magical realism.’
Aguilera-Malta, Demetrio. Seven Serpents and Seven Moons. Austin. 1979. University Of Texas Press. 0292775520. Translated from the Spanish by Gregory Rabassa. 305 pages. hardcover. Cover: Ed Lindlof

Jesus Christ is alive and well and militant in South America, albeit a bit careworn and singed upon his cross. So is the epic spirit that reveals a people’s tribulations and persistent survival. Demetrio Aguilera-Malta has combined these two age-old elements in his novel SEVEN SERPENTS AND SEVEN MOONS, set on the shores of Santorontón. This tropical village is inhabited by some exceptional beings: the vigorous, rough-hewn Father Cándido and his wry talking Jesus - a crucifix presented to him by pirates from out of the past; Colonel Candelario Mariscal, the despoiler who is said to be the son of the Devil and is seeking salvation through the honest love of the daughter of the witch doctor Bulu-Bulu; and Crisóstomo Chalena, the outsider who gains control of the town s roofs and rainwater and eventually the entire village. These and many other equally protean figures cross paths and swords as Santoronton is torn between the Evil One and the Crucified One. The story is invested with a pervading sense of magic and with political meaning as well. The fantastic microcosm of Santorontón illustrates both symbolically and literally many of the essential problems that bedevil Latin America.

DEMETRIO AGUILERA-MALTA (May 24, 1909, Guayaquil, Ecuador - December 28, 1981, Mexico City, Mexico), born in turn-of-the-century Ecuador, was a poet, playwright, essayist and novelist. Now recognized as one of the major literary influences in Latin America. Aguilera-Malta made a vital contribution to the development of ‘magical realism.’
Aguilera-Malta, Demetrio. Seven Serpents and Seven Moons. New York. 1981. Avon/Bard. 0380547678. Translated from the Spanish by Gregory Rabassa. 305 pages. paperback.

‘A PRODIGAL TALE OF SURREALISTIC INTRIGUE’ - Chicago Tribune Book World . . . In the coastal village of Santorontón, the battle between good and evil veers naturally into the unreal. Serving the power of good is Father Cándido, whose wooden Jesus is alive and ready to help. Evil is personified by the Colonel, a compulsive rapist, plunderer and murderer, who enacts his vilest deeds in the guise of a crocodile. Bedevilled by the lust of a woman unfortunately dead, he turns for salvation to the witch doctor’s daughter. Another seductress of Santorontón entices and castrates in the cause of womankind. And, adding to the villainy afoot, a despotic don has traded his soul for control of the water supply. Within this deftly devised entertainment of myth and fantasy, poetic metaphor and comic parody, there is the outraged social consciousness of a celebrated Ecuadorian ‘who deserves a rank;’ says the Houston Chronicle, ‘with the best of the older generation of South American writers’. ‘Aguilera-Malta is an important writer. Some of the hallucinatory scenes in SEVEN SERPENTS AND SEVEN MOONS haunt us as powerfully as those in Cortazar and Garcia Márquez!’ - Times (London) Literary Supplement.

DEMETRIO AGUILERA-MALTA (May 24, 1909, Guayaquil, Ecuador - December 28, 1981, Mexico City, Mexico), born in turn-of-the-century Ecuador, was a poet, playwright, essayist and novelist. Now recognized as one of the major literary influences in Latin America. Aguilera-Malta made a vital contribution to the development of ‘magical realism.’
Aguilera-Malta, Demetrio. Seven Serpents and Seven Moons. New York. 1981. Avon/Bard. 0380547678. Translated from the Spanish by Gregory Rabassa. 305 pages. paperback.

‘A PRODIGAL TALE OF SURREALISTIC INTRIGUE’ - Chicago Tribune Book World . . . In the coastal village of Santorontón, the battle between good and evil veers naturally into the unreal. Serving the power of good is Father Cándido, whose wooden Jesus is alive and ready to help. Evil is personified by the Colonel, a compulsive rapist, plunderer and murderer, who enacts his vilest deeds in the guise of a crocodile. Bedevilled by the lust of a woman unfortunately dead, he turns for salvation to the witch doctor’s daughter. Another seductress of Santorontón entices and castrates in the cause of womankind. And, adding to the villainy afoot, a despotic don has traded his soul for control of the water supply. Within this deftly devised entertainment of myth and fantasy, poetic metaphor and comic parody, there is the outraged social consciousness of a celebrated Ecuadorian ‘who deserves a rank;’ says the Houston Chronicle, ‘with the best of the older generation of South American writers’. ‘Aguilera-Malta is an important writer. Some of the hallucinatory scenes in SEVEN SERPENTS AND SEVEN MOONS haunt us as powerfully as those in Cortazar and Garcia Márquez!’ - Times (London) Literary Supplement.

DEMETRIO AGUILERA-MALTA (May 24, 1909, Guayaquil, Ecuador - December 28, 1981, Mexico City, Mexico), born in turn-of-the-century Ecuador, was a poet, playwright, essayist and novelist. Now recognized as one of the major literary influences in Latin America. Aguilera-Malta made a vital contribution to the development of ‘magical realism.’
Aguilera-Malta, Demetrio. Seven Serpents and Seven Moons. Austin. 1979. University Of Texas Press. 0292775520. Translated from the Spanish by Gregory Rabassa. 305 pages. hardcover. Cover: Ed Lindlof

Jesus Christ is alive and well and militant in South America, albeit a bit careworn and singed upon his cross. So is the epic spirit that reveals a people’s tribulations and persistent survival. Demetrio Aguilera-Malta has combined these two age-old elements in his novel SEVEN SERPENTS AND SEVEN MOONS, set on the shores of Santorontón. This tropical village is inhabited by some exceptional beings: the vigorous, rough-hewn Father Cándido and his wry talking Jesus - a crucifix presented to him by pirates from out of the past; Colonel Candelario Mariscal, the despoiler who is said to be the son of the Devil and is seeking salvation through the honest love of the daughter of the witch doctor Bulu-Bulu; and Crisóstomo Chalena, the outsider who gains control of the town s roofs and rainwater and eventually the entire village. These and many other equally protean figures cross paths and swords as Santoronton is torn between the Evil One and the Crucified One. The story is invested with a pervading sense of magic and with political meaning as well. The fantastic microcosm of Santorontón illustrates both symbolically and literally many of the essential problems that bedevil Latin America.

DEMETRIO AGUILERA-MALTA ((May 24, 1909, Guayaquil, Ecuador - December 28, 1981, Mexico City, Mexico), born in turn-of-the-century Ecuador, is a poet, playwright, essayist and novelist. Now recognized as one of the major literary influences in Latin America. Aguilera-Malta made a vital contribution to the development of ‘magical realism’, a creative blend of fantasy and myth, imbued with the vision of social and political turmoil. In the 1930s, he was one of the Ecuadorian writers who formed the Grupo de Guayaquil to further social change. His early works were judged crude and violent, but they were a turning point in Ecuadorian literature and have had an obvious impact on younger Latin American writers such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez. SEVEN SERPENTS AND SEVEN MOONS was first published in Mexico in 1970 and later in Spain and Italy. His other novels translated into English include MARCIELA (1967) and DON GOYO (1979). GREGORY RABASSA is internationally known as a master translator. He has won both the National Book Award for Translation and the American P.E.N. Translation Prize. He is the translator of Márquez’ One Hundred Years of Solitude and Autumn of the Patriarch.
Aguirre, Nataniel. Juan de las Rosa: Memoirs of the Last Soldier of the Independence Movement. New York. 1998. Oxford University Press. 0195113276. Translated from the Spanish by Sergio Gabriel Waisman. Edited & With A Foreword by Alba Maria Paz-Soldan. Library of Latin America series. 329 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Kathleen M. Lynch

Once considered a classic in Bolivia, Juan de la Rosa tells the story of a boy’s coming of age during the violent and tumultuous years of Bolivia’s struggle for independence. Indeed, in this remarkable novel, Juan’s search for his personal identity functions as an allegory of Bolivia’s search for its identity as a nation. Set in the early 1800s, this remarkable novel is narrated by one of the last surviving Bolivian rebels, octogenarian Juan de la Rosa. He commits his memories to paper in order to pass on that uniquely personal understanding of the past ‘with which serious historians never busy themselves.’ Juan recreates his childhood in the rebellious town of Cochabamba, and with it a large cast of full-bodied, Dickensian characters both heroic and malevolent, from Juan’s wise and self-sacrificing tutor, Brother Justo, to the ruthless colonial general Goyeneche. The larger cultural dislocations brought about by Bolivia’s political upheaval are echoed in those experienced by Juan, whose mother’s untimely death sets off a chain of unpredictable events that propel him into the fiery crucible of the South American Independence Movement. Outraged by Juan’s outspokenness against Spanish rule and his awakening political consciousness, his loyalist guardians banish him to the countryside, where he witnesses firsthand the Spaniards’ violent repression and rebels’ valiant resistance that crystallize both his personal destiny and that of his country. Few novels combine historical scholarship, operatic drama, comic detail, and political fervor so seamlessly. In Sergio Gabriel Waisman’s fluid translation, English readers have access to Juan de la Rosa for the very first time.

Nataniel Aguirre (1843-1888) was a Bolivian statesman who actively participated in events that shaped his country’s character. Sergio Gabriel Waisman is completing his Ph.D. in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of California, Berkeley. His translation of Ricardo Piglia’s Nombre Falso won the Meritorious Achievement Award in the 1995 Eugene M. Kayden National Translation Contest. Alba Maria de la Paz Soldán is Professor of Latin American Literature, University of Buenos Aires.
Ahern, Maureen and Tipton, David (editors and translators). Peru: The New Poetry. London. 1970. London Magazines Editions. 128 pages.

Translations of 12 contemporary poets, with emphasis on the works of Carlos German Belli and Antonio Cisneros. The edition includes a short introduction, by Tipton, prose statements (by Antonio Cisneros, Rodolfo Hinostrosa, Washington Delgado, and Sebastian Salazar Bondy) about the poetic climate of Peru, and biographical notes. Poets: Sebastian Salazar Bondy, Francisco Carrillo, Washington Delgado, Carlos German Belli, Juan Gonzalo Rose, Pablo Guevara, Rodolfo Hinostrosa, Antonio Cisneros, Javier Heraud, Marco Martos, Julio Ortega, Mirko Lauer.

Professor Maureen Ahern (July 14, 1936 - June 20, 2012) was a 1958 magna cum laude graduate of the University of New Hampshire. She earned a Bachelor's and Doctorate degrees, both in Literature, from the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Lima, Peru in 1960 and 1961, respectively. After many years of work and travel throughout Mexico and Peru, Professor Ahern returned to the United States in 1972 and became a Professor of Spanish at Arizona State University. From 1990 until shortly before her death, she was Professor of Spanish, Latin American Literature and Culture at The Ohio State University. David Tipton began translating Peruvian poetry while living in Lima (1964-70). He is a full time writer and apart from translations has published poetry, fiction, and biography. Recent stories have been published in the Arts Council Anthology, New Stories 1, Ambit, and the Yorkshire Review. He is at work on a second novel. His first novel, set in Peru, will be published in 1977.
Ahern, Maureen and Tipton, David (editors). Peru: The New Poetry. New York. 1977. Red Dust. 0873760247. 173 pages. hardcover. The jacket photograph is by Jesus Ruiz Durand. Jacket design by Robert Fabian.

An anthology of 15 contemporary Peruvian poets, the oldest born in 1922, the youngest in 1947. The poems themselves were written between 1959 and 1971. Three poets most influenced the growth of modern Peruvian poetry: Vallejo who was born a Catholic in the Andes and became a Marxist; Eguren who was a purist and strongly influenced by European poetry; and Adan who is a surrealist. The poems of the sixties while showing earlier influences are distinctively original. Statements and Comment from the book by three of the poets: Cisneros (born 1942) ‘ Peru has a fabulous past, but that ‘past’ doesn’t belong to me, . . . I know we’re distinct, but how? Vallejo . . . has given a pre-eminence to poetry here, . . . the possibility of establishing the validity of Peruvian poetry in an international context. Surrealism fed our poets for nearly two generations but is no longer much of an influence. Conflicts between ‘Social’, ‘Pure’ and ‘Elitist’ groups have become of far less importance. The actual work of a writer is the same as it’s always been: to be a witness of reality . . . Hinostroza (born 1941) ‘Our hearts are to the Left, in some cases our whole body, with others, the head only. How much does each poet lose on his book? I lost something like 6000 soles ($150) which is to say I pay the public to read me. ‘A nude Greek is very different to a nude Peruvian,’ it’s said. If I lean on the Puente de Piedra gazing at the Rio Rimac and meditate I’m a naked Peruvian, but if T. S. Eliot gazes t the Thames flowing and meditates he’s a nude Greek . . . Bondy (born 1924) ‘I was born in Calle Corazon de Jesus near the Church of the Orphans, the heart of Lima. I was descended from French immigrants and a Jewish family from the ghettoes of Prague. [My father’s] business underwent a crisis that led to it’s break-up and his death in 1933. My father had been surrounded by powerful and important friends. He was gone and those friendships disappeared too. It was during the first journey I made to Buenos Aires that I discovered Peru, not the Peru of the hymns and symbols, but the reality. It was there I found statistics telling me Peru was one of the hungriest nations in the World. . . one of the most exploited . . . one of the saddest. But there too I found I couldn’t live without it.’ CONTENTS: Introduction; JAVIER SOLOGUREN - Nazca Poetry; Poem; Snow; SEBASTIAN SALAZAR BONDY - Testament; Shades of Origin; Without Knowing Why; Exiled from the Light; Interior Patio; FRANCISCO CARRILLO - I love my Country; The Tannery; Procession; Composition I; Provincia 1 and 2; All Souls Day; WASHINGTON DELGADO - Imperfect Times; History of Peru; Human Wisdom; Good Manners; Life Explains and Death Spies Out; Plurality of Worlds; Foreign Land; Pure Thoughts; Monologue of the Inhabitant; Globetrotter; CARLOS GERMAN BELLI - Segregation; 0 Hada Cibernetica; Tongue-tied; JUAN GONZALO ROSE - The Beak of the Dove; From the Liturgy; A Confidence; Nata Natal; Faith, Hope and Charity; PABLO GUEVARA - My Father; Guita Bruner; An Attack, 1940; Babylon, 0 Babylon; Heaven and Hell; The Bourgeois are Beasts; From ‘Civil Marriage’; CECILIA BUSTAMANTE - Civil Marriage; Resonances; Notes; Facts; Birth; RODOLFO HINOSTROZA - To a Dead Childhood; Othello’s Report; The Night; ANTONIO CISNEROS - Paracas; Pachacamac; Workers of the Sun’s Land; Ancient Peru; The Dead Conquerors; Question of Time; Prayers of a Repentant Gentleman; Tupac Amaru Relegated; Tarma; Three Testimonies of Ayacucho; Description of a Plaza, a Monument and Allegories in Bronze; Karl Marx, died 1883, aged 65; Chronicle of Lima; Between the Quay of San Nicolas and the Sea; Loneliness 2; I’m getting out and going some 30 kilometers towards the coast; In 62 the starving seabirds reached the center of Lima; A sonnet in which I say my son is a long way off and has been for more than a year; JAVIER HERAUD - A Guerrilla’s Word; A Guerrilla’s Goodbye; Summer; From ‘Earth Poems’; A New Journey; MARCO MARTOS - Our House; Quijote; From ‘Casa Nuestra’; Politics; JULIO ORTEGA - Fishermen; Memory of Light and Dust; October; Sound of Water; Report for Isolda; My Country; Cecilia; Avenida Abancay; End of Autumn; The Catastrophe (Chimbote); MIRKO LAUER - The Angels; Cruel Photograph without Light at Daybreak; The Classics Revisited; Tanks; 1916; Finger-print; To the Memory of a Pre-Incaic Wiseman; Leit-Motif: Oh Great City of Lima; Notes on the moving of a corpse; Lynx; The Amphibians; Patios of Ithaca; ABELARDO SANCHEZ LEON - Poems 1,2,3, and 4; Statements and Comment; On the Situation of the Writer in Peru; ANTONIO CISNEROS; RODOLFO HINOSTROZA; On the Death of Javier Heraud by WASHINGTON DELGADO; Autobiographical Comment by SEBASTIAN SALAZAR BONDY; Biographical Notes.

Professor Maureen Ahern (July 14, 1936 - June 20, 2012) was a 1958 magna cum laude graduate of the University of New Hampshire. She earned a Bachelor's and Doctorate degrees, both in Literature, from the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos in Lima, Peru in 1960 and 1961, respectively. After many years of work and travel throughout Mexico and Peru, Professor Ahern returned to the United States in 1972 and became a Professor of Spanish at Arizona State University. From 1990 until shortly before her death, she was Professor of Spanish, Latin American Literature and Culture at The Ohio State University. David Tipton began translating Peruvian poetry while living in Lima (1964-70). He is a full time writer and apart from translations has published poetry, fiction, and biography. Recent stories have been published in the Arts Council Anthology, New Stories 1, Ambit, and the Yorkshire Review. He is at work on a second novel. His first novel, set in Peru, will be published in 1977. Ena Hollis, 1934-1970, was also a poet and published two collections: The Lemon Tree and Strange Landfalls. She was married to David Tipton. She died in 1970.
Aira, Cesar. An Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter. New York. 2006. New Directions. 9780811216302. Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews. Preface by Roberto Bolano. 87 pages. paperback. NDP1035. Cover art - ‘Drawing and oil painting of the road from Orizaba to Acultzingo’, 1831 b J. M. Rugendas

An astounding novel from Argentina that is a meditation on the beautiful and the grotesque in nature, on the art of landscape painting, and on one experience in a man’s life that became a lightning rod for inspiration. ‘If there is one contemporary writer who defies classification, it is César Aira.’ - Roberto Bolaño. ‘The author who nowadays is perhaps the most original and shocking, the most exciting and subversive Spanish narrative writer: César Aira.’ - Ignacio Echeverri. AN EPISODE IN THE LIFE OF A LANDSCAPE PAINTER is the story of a moment in the life of the German artist Johann Moritz Rugendas (1802-1858). Greatly admired as a master landscape painter, he was advised by Alexander von Humboldt to record the spectacular landscapes of Chile, Argentina, and Mexico. Rugendas did in fact become one of the best of the nineteenth-century European painters to venture into Latin America. However this is not a biography of Rugendas. This work of fiction weaves an almost surreal history around Rugendas’ trips to Argentina where he strived to achieve in art the ‘physiognomic totality’ of Humboldt’s scientific vision of the whole. A brief and dramatic visit to the pampas gives him the chance to fulfill his ambition but a strange episode that he cannot avoid absorbing savagely into his own body interrupts the trip and irreversibly marks him for life.

César Aira (born 23 February 1949 in Coronel Pringles, Buenos Aires Province) is an Argentine writer and translator, and an exponent of Argentine contemporary literature. Aira has published over eighty short books of stories, novels and essays. In fact, at least since 1993 a hallmark of his work is an almost frenetic level of writing and publication—two to four novella-length books each year. He has lectured at the University of Buenos Aires, on Copi and Arthur Rimbaud, and at the University of Rosario on Constructivism and Stéphane Mallarmé, and has translated and edited books from France, England, Italy, Brazil, Spain, Mexico, and Venezuela. Besides his fiction, and the translation work he does for a living, Aira also writes literary criticism, including monographic studies of Copi, the poet Alejandra Pizarnik, and the nineteenth-century British limerick and nonsense writer Edward Lear. He wrote a short book, Las tres fechas (The Three Dates), arguing for the central importance, when approaching some minor eccentric writers, of examining the moment of their lives about which they are writing, the date of completion of the work, and the date of publication of the work. Aira also was the literary executor of the complete works of his friend the poet and novelist Osvaldo Lamborghini (1940–1985). Aira has often spoken in interviews of elaborating an avant-garde aesthetic in which, rather than editing what he has written, he engages in a "flight forward" (fuga hacia adelante) to improvise a way out of the corners he writes himself into. Aira also seeks in his own work, and praises in the work of others (such as the Argentine-Parisian cartoonist and comic novelist Copi), the "continuum" (el continuo) of a constant momentum in the fictional narrative. As a result, his fictions can jump radically from one genre to another, and often deploy narrative strategies from popular culture and "subliterary" genres like pulp science fiction and television soap operas. He frequently refuses to conform to generic expectations for how a novel ought to end, leaving many of his fictions quite open-ended. While his subject matter ranges from Surrealist or Dadaist quasi-nonsense to fantastic tales set in his Buenos Aires neighborhood of Flores, Aira also returns frequently to Argentina’s nineteenth century (two books translated into English, The Hare and An Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter, are examples of this; so is the best-known novel of his early years, Ema la cautiva (Emma, the Captive)). He also returns regularly to play with stereotypes of an exotic East, such as in Una novela china, (A Chinese Novel); El volante (The Flyer), and El pequeño monje budista (The Little Buddhist Monk). Aira also enjoys mocking himself and his childhood home town, Coronel Pringles, in fictions such as Cómo me hice monja (How I Became a Nun), Cómo me reí (How I Laughed), El cerebro musical (The Musical Brain) and Las curas milagrosas del doctor Aira (The Miraculous Cures of Dr. Aira). His novella La prueba (1992) served as the basis—or point of departure, as only the first half-hour follows the novella—of Diego Lerman's film Tan de repente (Suddenly) (2002). His novel Cómo me hice monja (How I Became a Nun) was selected as one of the ten best publications in Spain in the year 1998.
Aira, Cesar. Ghosts. New York. 2008. New Directions. 9780811217422. Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews. 139 pages. paperback. Cover design by Rodrigo Corral

GHOSTS revolves around an immigrant worker’s family squatting on the haunted construction site of a luxury condominium building. All of the workmen and their wives and children see the ghosts, who literally hang around the place, but one teenage girl becomes the most curious. Her questions about the ghosts get so intense that her mother - in a chilling split-second – realizes her daughter’s life hangs in the balance. Once you have started reading Aira, you don’t want-to stop.’ – Roberto Bolano. ‘Aira is firmly in the tradition of Jorge Luis Borges and W. G. Sebald’ – Mark Doty, Los Angeles Times.

César Aira (born 23 February 1949 in Coronel Pringles, Buenos Aires Province) is an Argentine writer and translator, and an exponent of Argentine contemporary literature. Aira has published over eighty short books of stories, novels and essays. In fact, at least since 1993 a hallmark of his work is an almost frenetic level of writing and publication—two to four novella-length books each year. He has lectured at the University of Buenos Aires, on Copi and Arthur Rimbaud, and at the University of Rosario on Constructivism and Stéphane Mallarmé, and has translated and edited books from France, England, Italy, Brazil, Spain, Mexico, and Venezuela. Besides his fiction, and the translation work he does for a living, Aira also writes literary criticism, including monographic studies of Copi, the poet Alejandra Pizarnik, and the nineteenth-century British limerick and nonsense writer Edward Lear. He wrote a short book, Las tres fechas (The Three Dates), arguing for the central importance, when approaching some minor eccentric writers, of examining the moment of their lives about which they are writing, the date of completion of the work, and the date of publication of the work. Aira also was the literary executor of the complete works of his friend the poet and novelist Osvaldo Lamborghini (1940–1985). Aira has often spoken in interviews of elaborating an avant-garde aesthetic in which, rather than editing what he has written, he engages in a "flight forward" (fuga hacia adelante) to improvise a way out of the corners he writes himself into. Aira also seeks in his own work, and praises in the work of others (such as the Argentine-Parisian cartoonist and comic novelist Copi), the "continuum" (el continuo) of a constant momentum in the fictional narrative. As a result, his fictions can jump radically from one genre to another, and often deploy narrative strategies from popular culture and "subliterary" genres like pulp science fiction and television soap operas. He frequently refuses to conform to generic expectations for how a novel ought to end, leaving many of his fictions quite open-ended. While his subject matter ranges from Surrealist or Dadaist quasi-nonsense to fantastic tales set in his Buenos Aires neighborhood of Flores, Aira also returns frequently to Argentina’s nineteenth century (two books translated into English, The Hare and An Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter, are examples of this; so is the best-known novel of his early years, Ema la cautiva (Emma, the Captive)). He also returns regularly to play with stereotypes of an exotic East, such as in Una novela china, (A Chinese Novel); El volante (The Flyer), and El pequeño monje budista (The Little Buddhist Monk). Aira also enjoys mocking himself and his childhood home town, Coronel Pringles, in fictions such as Cómo me hice monja (How I Became a Nun), Cómo me reí (How I Laughed), El cerebro musical (The Musical Brain) and Las curas milagrosas del doctor Aira (The Miraculous Cures of Dr. Aira). His novella La prueba (1992) served as the basis—or point of departure, as only the first half-hour follows the novella—of Diego Lerman's film Tan de repente (Suddenly) (2002). His novel Cómo me hice monja (How I Became a Nun) was selected as one of the ten best publications in Spain in the year 1998.
Aira, Cesar. The Hare. London. 1998. Serpent's Tail. 1852422912. Translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor. 248 pages. paperback. Cover design & illustration by Oscar Zarate.

The Indians he meets report recent sightings of the hare, but on further investigation, Clark finds in these sightings more than meets the eye. The Hare, the first novel by Cesar Aira to be translated into English, is a subtle reflection on love, language, and colonial dependency. César Aira (born on February 23, 1949 in Coronel Pringles, Buenos Aires Province) is an Argentine writer and translator, considered by many as one of the leading exponents of Argentine contemporary literature, in spite of his limited public recognition. He has published over fifty books of stories, novels and essays. Indeed, at least since 1993 a hallmark of his work is an almost frenetic level of writing and publication –two to four novella-length books each year. Aira has often spoken in interviews of elaborating an avant-garde aesthetic in which, rather than editing what he has written, he engages in a ‘flight forward’ (fuga hacia adelante) to improvise a way out of the corners he writes himself into. Aira also seeks in his own work, and praises in the work of others (such as the Argentine-Parisian cartoonist and comic novelist Copi), the ‘continuum’ (el continuo) of a constant movement forward in the fictional narrative. As a result his fictions can jump radically from one genre to another, and often deploy narrative strategies from popular culture and ‘subliterary’ genres like pulp science fiction and television soap operas; on the other hand, he frequently deliberately refuses to conform to generic expectations for how a novel ought to end, leaving many of his fictions quite open-ended. While his subject matter ranges from Surrealist or Dadaist quasi-nonsense to fantastic tales set in his Buenos Aires neighborhood in Flores, Aira also returns frequently to Argentina’s nineteenth century (the two books translated into English, The Hare and An Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter, are examples of this; so is the best-known novel of his early years, ‘Ema la cautiva’ (Emma, the Captive)). He also returns regularly to play with stereotypes of an exotic East (‘Una novela china’, A Chinese Novel); ‘El volante’ (The Flyer), and ‘El pequeño monje budista’ (The Little Buddhist Monk)). Aira also enjoys mocking himself and his childhood home town Coronel Pringles in fictions such as ‘Cómo me hice monja’ (How I Became a Nun), ‘Cómo me reí’ (How I Laughed), ‘El cerebro musical’ (The Musical Brain) and ‘Las curas milagrosas del doctor Aira’ (The Miraculous Cures of Dr. Aira). His novel ‘Cómo me hice monja’ (How I Became a Nun) was selected as one of the best 10 publications in Spain in the year 1998. Besides his fiction, and the translation work he does for a living, Aira also writes literary criticism, including monographic studies of Copi, the poet Alejandra Pizarnik, and the nineteenth-century British limerick and nonsense writer Edward Lear. He wrote a short book, Las tres fechas [The Three Dates], arguing for the central importance, when approaching some minor eccentric writers, of examining the moment of their lives about which they are writing , the date of completion of the work, and the date of publication of the work. Since publishing this theory Aira no longer includes the date of completion of his own works. Aira also was the literary executor of the complete works of his friend the scabrous poet-novelist Osvaldo Lamborghini (1940-1985). .

César Aira (born 23 February 1949 in Coronel Pringles, Buenos Aires Province) is an Argentine writer and translator, and an exponent of Argentine contemporary literature. Aira has published over eighty short books of stories, novels and essays. In fact, at least since 1993 a hallmark of his work is an almost frenetic level of writing and publication—two to four novella-length books each year. He has lectured at the University of Buenos Aires, on Copi and Arthur Rimbaud, and at the University of Rosario on Constructivism and Stéphane Mallarmé, and has translated and edited books from France, England, Italy, Brazil, Spain, Mexico, and Venezuela. Besides his fiction, and the translation work he does for a living, Aira also writes literary criticism, including monographic studies of Copi, the poet Alejandra Pizarnik, and the nineteenth-century British limerick and nonsense writer Edward Lear. He wrote a short book, Las tres fechas (The Three Dates), arguing for the central importance, when approaching some minor eccentric writers, of examining the moment of their lives about which they are writing, the date of completion of the work, and the date of publication of the work. Aira also was the literary executor of the complete works of his friend the poet and novelist Osvaldo Lamborghini (1940–1985). Aira has often spoken in interviews of elaborating an avant-garde aesthetic in which, rather than editing what he has written, he engages in a "flight forward" (fuga hacia adelante) to improvise a way out of the corners he writes himself into. Aira also seeks in his own work, and praises in the work of others (such as the Argentine-Parisian cartoonist and comic novelist Copi), the "continuum" (el continuo) of a constant momentum in the fictional narrative. As a result, his fictions can jump radically from one genre to another, and often deploy narrative strategies from popular culture and "subliterary" genres like pulp science fiction and television soap operas. He frequently refuses to conform to generic expectations for how a novel ought to end, leaving many of his fictions quite open-ended. While his subject matter ranges from Surrealist or Dadaist quasi-nonsense to fantastic tales set in his Buenos Aires neighborhood of Flores, Aira also returns frequently to Argentina’s nineteenth century (two books translated into English, The Hare and An Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter, are examples of this; so is the best-known novel of his early years, Ema la cautiva (Emma, the Captive)). He also returns regularly to play with stereotypes of an exotic East, such as in Una novela china, (A Chinese Novel); El volante (The Flyer), and El pequeño monje budista (The Little Buddhist Monk). Aira also enjoys mocking himself and his childhood home town, Coronel Pringles, in fictions such as Cómo me hice monja (How I Became a Nun), Cómo me reí (How I Laughed), El cerebro musical (The Musical Brain) and Las curas milagrosas del doctor Aira (The Miraculous Cures of Dr. Aira). His novella La prueba (1992) served as the basis—or point of departure, as only the first half-hour follows the novella—of Diego Lerman's film Tan de repente (Suddenly) (2002). His novel Cómo me hice monja (How I Became a Nun) was selected as one of the ten best publications in Spain in the year 1998.
Aira, Cesar. The Musical Brain and Other Stories. New York. 2015. New Directions. 9780811220293. Translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews. 353 pages. hardcover.

The Musical Brain & Other Stories consists of twenty stories about oddballs, freaks, and crazy people from the writer The New York Review of Books calls the novelist who can't be stopped. The author of at least eighty novels, most of them barely 96 pages each, with just nine of them so far published into English, Aira's work, and his fuga hacia adelante or flight forward into the unknown has already given us imponderables to ponder, bizarre and seemingly out of context plotlines to consider, thoughtful, and almost religious, certainly passionate takes on everyday reality. The Musical Brain is the best sampling of Aira's creativity so far, and a most exhilarating collection of characters, places, and ideas.

César Aira (born 23 February 1949 in Coronel Pringles, Buenos Aires Province) is an Argentine writer and translator, and an exponent of Argentine contemporary literature. Aira has published over eighty short books of stories, novels and essays. In fact, at least since 1993 a hallmark of his work is an almost frenetic level of writing and publication—two to four novella-length books each year. He has lectured at the University of Buenos Aires, on Copi and Arthur Rimbaud, and at the University of Rosario on Constructivism and Stéphane Mallarmé, and has translated and edited books from France, England, Italy, Brazil, Spain, Mexico, and Venezuela. Besides his fiction, and the translation work he does for a living, Aira also writes literary criticism, including monographic studies of Copi, the poet Alejandra Pizarnik, and the nineteenth-century British limerick and nonsense writer Edward Lear. He wrote a short book, Las tres fechas (The Three Dates), arguing for the central importance, when approaching some minor eccentric writers, of examining the moment of their lives about which they are writing, the date of completion of the work, and the date of publication of the work. Aira also was the literary executor of the complete works of his friend the poet and novelist Osvaldo Lamborghini (1940–1985). Aira has often spoken in interviews of elaborating an avant-garde aesthetic in which, rather than editing what he has written, he engages in a "flight forward" (fuga hacia adelante) to improvise a way out of the corners he writes himself into. Aira also seeks in his own work, and praises in the work of others (such as the Argentine-Parisian cartoonist and comic novelist Copi), the "continuum" (el continuo) of a constant momentum in the fictional narrative. As a result, his fictions can jump radically from one genre to another, and often deploy narrative strategies from popular culture and "subliterary" genres like pulp science fiction and television soap operas. He frequently refuses to conform to generic expectations for how a novel ought to end, leaving many of his fictions quite open-ended. While his subject matter ranges from Surrealist or Dadaist quasi-nonsense to fantastic tales set in his Buenos Aires neighborhood of Flores, Aira also returns frequently to Argentina’s nineteenth century (two books translated into English, The Hare and An Episode in the Life of a Landscape Painter, are examples of this; so is the best-known novel of his early years, Ema la cautiva (Emma, the Captive)). He also returns regularly to play with stereotypes of an exotic East, such as in Una novela china, (A Chinese Novel); El volante (The Flyer), and El pequeño monje budista (The Little Buddhist Monk). Aira also enjoys mocking himself and his childhood home town, Coronel Pringles, in fictions such as Cómo me hice monja (How I Became a Nun), Cómo me reí (How I Laughed), El cerebro musical (The Musical Brain) and Las curas milagrosas del doctor Aira (The Miraculous Cures of Dr. Aira). His novella La prueba (1992) served as the basis—or point of departure, as only the first half-hour follows the novella—of Diego Lerman's film Tan de repente (Suddenly) (2002). His novel Cómo me hice monja (How I Became a Nun) was selected as one of the ten best publications in Spain in the year 1998.
Aizenberg, Edna (editor). Borges and His Successors: The Borgesian Impact On Literature & the Arts. Columbia. 1990. University Of Missouri Press. 082620712x. 296 pages. hardcover. Jacket photograph by Julie Mendez Ezcurra

The centrality of Jorge Luis Borges to the contemporary aesthetic imagination has been widely recognized, but no comprehensive study of his impact on the arts of our time has appeared. In the first book devoted to that topic, Edna Aizenberg brings together specially commissioned and translated essays from a variety of disciplines to provide a wide-ranging assessment of Borges’s influence. Presenting the insights of critics from South America, France, and Germany as well as those from the United States, this collection views Borges as a redefiner of national literatures a forerunner of a new critical idiom, a dialogist with other writers, and a source of inspiration in the visual arts, particularly Latin American cinema and North American painting. Readers interested in contemporary literary theory will welcome the discussion of Borges’s commonalities with major theorists such as Foucault, Derrida, De Man, and Eco, as well as the examination of Borgess impact on the fictions of Calvino, Barth, Coover, the Australian Carey, and the Latin Americans Elizondo and Sarduy. And many readers will find valuable the final section of the book, which contains two little-known lectures by Borges, translated into English for the first time; in them, Borges analyzes the Book of Job and the ideas of Baruch Spinoza, both of them fundamental to an appreciation of his literature. By offering a broad view of Borges’s influence on postmodernism, deconstruction, and other contemporary intellectual currents, this collection goes far in explaining Borgess major role in contemporary culture. CONTENTS: Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Introduction by Edna Aizenberg; I. REDEFINING NATIONAL LITERATURES - Ana Maria Barrenechea/On the Diverse (South American) Intonation of Some (Universal) Metaphors; Marta Morello-Frosch/Borges and Contemporary Argentine Writers: Continuity and Change; Robert Ross/’It Cannot Not Be There’: Borges and Australia’s Peter Carey; Rafael Gutiérrez Girardot/Borges in Germany: A Difficult and Contradictory Fascination; Françoise Collin/The Third Tiger; or, From Blanchot to Borges; II. A NEW CRITICAL IDIOM - Jaime Alazraki/Borges’s Modernism and the New Critical Idiom; Gerry O’Sullivan/The Library Is on Fire: Intertextuality in Borges and Foucault; Suzanne Jill Levine/Borges and Emir: The Writer and His Reader; Emir Rodriguez Monegal/Borges and Derrida: Apothecaries; Herman Rapaport/Borges, De Man, and the Deconstruction of Reading; Christine de Lailhacar/The Mirror and the Encyclopedia: Borgesian Codes in Umberto Eco’s THE NAME OF THE ROSE; III. IN DIALOGUE WITH OTHER WRITERS - Jerry Varsava/The Last Fictions: Calvino’s Borgesian Odysseys; Geoffrey Green/Postmodern Precursor: The Borgesian Image in Innovative American Fiction; Malva F. Filer/Salvador Elizondo and Severo Sarduy: Two Borgesian Writers; IV. THE VISUAL ARTS - Richard Peña/ Borges and the New Latin American Cinema; Jules Kirschenbaum/Dream of a Golem; V. HEBRAISM AND POETIC INFLUENCE - Edna Aizenberg/Borges and the Hebraism of Contemporary Literary Theory; Edna Aizenberg/Introduction to Two Lectures by Borges; Jorge Luis Borges/The Book of Job; Jorge Luis Borges/Baruch Spinoza; About the Contributors; Index; Index to Works by forges Cited in Text.

Edna Aizenberg is Associate Professor of Spanish at Marymount Manhattan College. She is the author of THE ALEPH, WEAVER: BIBLICAL, KABBALISTIC AND JUDAIC ELEMENTS IN BORGES, which was published in Spanish translation in 1986, and of numerous articles on Latin American and comparative literature.
Alazraki, Jaime and Ivask, Ivan (editors). The Final Island: The Fiction of Julio Cortazar. Norman. 1978. University Of Oklahoma Press. 0806114363. 199 pages. hardcover.

The Argentine fiction writer Julio Cortázar is one of the most universal of a generation of Spanish American writers who have changed the status of Spanish American literature in the world of letters, but he has received very little critical treatment in English. Students of contemporary Spanish literature at all levels need this collection of essays and texts by him and about his work. The original texts, unpublished before in book form, include a short story, ‘Second Time Around,’ and essays on ‘The Present State of Fiction in Latin America’ and ‘Politics and the Intellectual in Latin America.’ Professor Alazraki’s introduction provides an overview of Cortázar’s work for new readers and initiates. The essays following by leading Cortázar specialists relate Cortázar to the other giants of contemporary Spanish American literature, Borges and Paz, and interpret his work in the light of such important contemporary movements as Laingian psychoanalysis, surrealism, and phenomenology. All of the important novels and major short stories are treated. The writer’s position in European letters - he lived in Belgium till age four and took up residence in France during his middle years - is fully explored. A bibliography of works by and about Cortázar in all the major languages completes this exhaustive collection of critical material. A selection of photographs from Cortázar’s personal files is an added ornament to the book. Contributors include: Jaime Alazraki, Lida Aronne Amestoy, Sara Castro-Klarén, Julio Cortázar, Roberto Gonzalez Echevarria, Malva E. Filer, Martha Paley Francescato, Evelyn Picon Garfield, Ana Maria Hernández, Gregory Rabassa, Margery A. Safir, Saul Sosnowski, & Saul Yurkievich.

JAIME ALAZRAKI (January 26, 1934, Argentina - February 9, 2014, Barcelona, Spain) was Professor of Romance Languages and Literature at Harvard University. IVAR IVASK is Professor of Modern Languages at the University of Oklahoma and Editor of World Literature Today. He is the editor of two other critical collections published by the University of Oklahoma Press, The Perpetual Present: The Poetry and Prose of Octavio Paz and The Cardinal Points of Borges (coedited with Lowell Dunham).
Alberto, Eliseo. Caracol Beach. New York. 2000. Knopf. 0375405402. Winner Of Spain's Prestigious Alfaguara Prize in Fiction. Translated from the Spanish by Edith Grossman. 289 pages. hardcover. Cover: Walton Ford-'Thanh Hoang'

WINNER of Spain’s prestigious Alfaguara Prize in Fiction, CARACOL BEACH is a gripping, kaleidoscopic novel about isolation, love, fear, and the collision of strangers’ lives on one fateful night in a Florida town. On the outskirts of the quiet resort community of Caracol Beach, its unlikeliest-and perhaps most dangerous-resident plots his own demise. A Cuban veteran of the war in Angola, the sole survivor of an ambush that killed off the rest of his platoon, Beto Milanés has for eighteen years been racked with guilt and grief and tormented by terrible visions. Determined to end his suffering but unable to take his own life, he sets out to find someone who will do it for him. So begins a night of madness, violence, and, ultimately, redemption. Drawn into the soldier’s nightmare world are an improbable group of men and women, whose lives will never again be the same: an aging police chief with a penchant for pizza; a foulmouthed prostitute; a transvestite with a killer judo chop; a beautiful student haunted by her own ghosts; and two ill-fated would-be heroes. With audacity, humor, and deep insight into the human condition, Eliseo Alberto explores the horror of war, the pain of exile, the power of forgiveness, and the inescapable, sometimes cruel toll of destiny. The story that unfolds is at once shocking and comic, surprising and poignant, evoking classic tragedy and the absurdity of modern life. Combining the narrative power of a master storyteller with the phantasmagoric vision of a filmmaker, Eliseo Alberto has created a literary tour de force.

ELISEO ALBERTO, winner of the first International Alfaguara Prize in Fiction (1998), was born in Arroyo Naranjo, Cuba. He has written screenplays for film and television, and has taught at the International Film School in San Antonio de los Baños in Cuba, the Center for Cinematographic Training of Mexico, and the Sundance Institute. He lives in Mexico City.
Aldrich Jr. , Earl M. The Modern Short Story in Peru. Madison. 1966. University Of Wisconsin Press. 212 pages. hardcover.

In 1904 the first published collection of full-fledged short stories by a Peruvian author appeared, and in the following sixty years this form evolved into the most cultivated and significant type of fiction in Peru, Its steady growth stands out in sharp contrast to the relatively slow and irregular development of the novel, a discrepancy that has been explained in both psychological and economic terms. But the important fact is that the modern short story form clearly dominates contemporary Peruvian fiction, and it is through this form that one is able to trace Peru’s major aesthetic and social currents. To provide a chronological view of this literary development, Professor Aldrich devotes each of five chapters to a significant phase in the maturation of this art form, He examines the short story in Peru as it evolves from a production studiedly cosmopolitan in nature, through one oriented along national lines, with the distinctive rural areas of Peru providing the settings for the action, and finally to its most recent stage in which emphasis is placed on the urban scene and on the more universal problems of modern man, Working from primary sources-published and unpublished stories by the writers discussed and biographical and historical material gained from Peruvian newspapers, journals, and magazines, as well as personal interviews with a number of the authors-Professor Aldrich brings to this subject a wealth of firsthand information, and he includes poignant biographical data as it relates to the specific works under consideration. Abundant quotations from the works discussed verify his observations and add life and pungency to the narrative. English translations appear in the text, but for readers of Spanish the original excerpts are given in a section at the end.

Earl M. Aldrich, Jr., Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Wisconsin is a contributing editor to the literary section of the Handbook of Latin American Studies, As Field Director of the Indiana University Junior Year Program to Peru in 1959-60, he did intensive research and was able to interview some of the authors in Peru. Two of the most prominent men, Ciro Alegria and Enrique Lopez Albujar, provided him with their manuscripts of unpublished stories and of ones difficult to find, The result of his scholarship is the first full-scale study of the modern short story in Peru, of value both to the literary world and to the field of Latin American studies.
Alegria, Ciro. Broad and Alien is the World. New York. 1941. Farrar & Rinehart. Translated from the Spanish by Harriet De Onis. 424 pages. hardcover. Cover art by Hallock

High up in the mountains of Peru lay the small village of Rumi. It was a happy and industrious village where everyone had his job to do, both for himself and his community. The wants of the villagers were simple, their pleasures few, and their work hard but satisfying. There were few problems of government, but for those that did arise they had a mayor and four selectmen to speak for them. Rosendo Maqui was the mayor: a man of deep wisdom and understanding for his people. But one day Don Alvaro Amenabar, the rich and predatory ranch owner of the town in the valley, instituted a suit against the community, charging that the land it had occupied for so many generations rightfully belonged to him. The villagers of Rumi were panic-stricken. They had always lived in Rumi! So had their fathers and their fathers before them. It was Rosendo Maqui’s responsibility to fight Don Alvaro in the courts and to save the village of Rumi from such despotism. Rosendo Maqui and his people, being good people, tried to fight the evil of Don Alvaro the way they had always fought everything, with hard work, perseverance, and honesty. In the life and death struggle of this small South American village to maintain its integrity, its dignity, its very existence against the lust for power, the reader cannot help but see the parallel to the bitter and total wars of today which are raging over the whole earth. The simple story of BROAD AND ALIEN IS THE WORLD can be the story of any community anywhere trying to conduct itself along the paths of truth, vision, and mutual well-being, and forced to fight for its life against the malignant forces of evil oppression and greed which suddenly seem to be loosed in such overwhelming numbers. And the outcome of the struggle, the final peace, lies only in the hand of God.

Ciro Alegría Bazán (November 4, 1909 – February 17, 1967) was a Peruvian journalist, politician, and novelist. Born in Huamachuco District, he exposed the problems of the native Peruvians while learning about their way of life.
Alegria, Ciro. Broad and Alien is the World. London/Philadelphia. 1962. Merlin/Dufour. Translated from the Spanish by Harriet De Onis. 434 pages. hardcover.

This is the story of the people of Rumi, men of the Andes, whose community has followed its peaceful course time out of mind, bound to the fruitful soil and to the rhythm of life that the earth imposes. Under the cloak of the Law their way of life is overturned, they are dispossessed and withdraw to the barren uplands. Here they are still threatened by the ranchers and by the slavery of the mines. The younger members of the community go to seek a new life on the rubber plantations in the jungle or on the malaria-ridden plains where coca is grown; some go to join the bandits in the hills. Betrayed by the Law, where should men turn for Justice? This is the question that hangs over Ciro Alegria’ s moving and evocative novel.

Ciro Alegría Bazán (November 4, 1909 – February 17, 1967) was a Peruvian journalist, politician, and novelist. Born in Huamachuco District, he exposed the problems of the native Peruvians while learning about their way of life. This understanding of how they were oppressed was the focus for his novels. He attended classes at the University of Trujillo, and worked briefly as a journalist for the newspaper El Norte. In 1930 Alegría joined the Aprista movement, dedicated to social reform as well as improving the welfare of native Peruvians. He was imprisoned several times for his political activities before finally being exiled to Chile in 1934. He remained in exile in both Chile and later the United States up until 1948. Later, he taught at the University of Puerto Rico, and wrote about the Cuban revolution while in Cuba. His most well known novel, Broad and Alien is the World (1941) or El mundo es ancho y ajeno, won the Latin American Novel Prize in 1941, and brought him international attention. It depicts an Andean community, living in the Peruvian highlands. The book was later published in the United States and has been reprinted many times, in multiple languages. Alegría returned to Peru in 1957. He joined President Fernando Belaúnde Terry's party (Acción Popular) and was elected to the Chamber of Deputies in 1963. He died unexpectedly in Lima, Peru on February 17, 1967. After his death, his widow published many of his essays and reports he had written for various newspapers. He was 58 years old.
Alegria, Ciro. Broad and Alien is the World. New York. 1941. Farrar & Rinehart. Translated from the Spanish by Harriet De Onis. 424 pages. hardcover. Cover art by Hallock

BROAD AND ALIEN IS THE WORLD one of the most impressive novels I’ve ever read in Spanish.’-JOHN DOS PASSOS . . . Ciro Alegria writes with passion and inspiration of things which he has seen and known. His language is simple and direct, his story is touched with the universality and human wisdom that make enduring literature in any country and in any language. High up in the mountains of Peru lay the small village of Rumi. It was a happy and industrious village where everyone had his job to do, both for himself and his community. The wants of the villagers were simple, their pleasures few, and their work hard but satisfying. There were few problems of government, but for those that did arise they had a mayor and four selectmen to speak for them. Rosendo Maqui was the mayor: a man of deep wisdom and understanding for his people. But one day Don Alvaro Amenabar, the rich and predatory ranch owner of the town in the valley, instituted a suit against the community, charging that the land it had occupied for so many generations rightfully belonged to him. The villagers of Rumi were panic-stricken. They had always lived in Rumi! So had their fathers and their fathers before them. It was Rosendo Maqui’s respon- sibility to fight Don Alvaro in the courts and to save the village of Rumi from such despotism. Rosendo Maqui and his people, being good people, tried to fight the evil of Don Alvaro the way they had always fought everything, with hard work, perseverance, and honesty. In the life and death struggle of this small South American village to maintain its integrity, its dignity, its very existence against the lust for power, the reader cannot help but see the parallel to the bitter and total wars of today which are raging over the whole earth. The simple story of BROAD AND ALIEN IS THE WORLD can be the story of any community anywhere trying to conduct itself along the paths of truth, vision, and mutual well-being, and forced to fight for its life against the malignant forces of evil oppression and greed which suddenly seem to be loosed in such overwhelming numbers. And the outcome of the struggle, the final peace, lies only in the hand of God.

Ciro Alegría Bazán (November 4, 1909 – February 17, 1967) was a Peruvian journalist, politician, and novelist. Born in Huamachuco District, he exposed the problems of the native Peruvians while learning about their way of life. This understanding of how they were oppressed was the focus for his novels. He attended classes at the University of Trujillo, and worked briefly as a journalist for the newspaper El Norte. In 1930 Alegría joined the Aprista movement, dedicated to social reform as well as improving the welfare of native Peruvians. He was imprisoned several times for his political activities before finally being exiled to Chile in 1934. He remained in exile in both Chile and later the United States up until 1948. Later, he taught at the University of Puerto Rico, and wrote about the Cuban revolution while in Cuba. His most well known novel, Broad and Alien is the World (1941) or El mundo es ancho y ajeno, won the Latin American Novel Prize in 1941, and brought him international attention. It depicts an Andean community, living in the Peruvian highlands. The book was later published in the United States and has been reprinted many times, in multiple languages. Alegría returned to Peru in 1957. He joined President Fernando Belaúnde Terry's party (Acción Popular) and was elected to the Chamber of Deputies in 1963. He died unexpectedly in Lima, Peru on February 17, 1967. After his death, his widow published many of his essays and reports he had written for various newspapers. He was 58 years old.
Alegria, Ciro. The Golden Serpent. New York. 1943. Farrar & Rinehart. Translated from the Spanish by Harriet De Onis. 242 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Jose Sabogal

Ciro Alegria, the prizewinner of the Farrar & Rinehart 1941 Latin American Novel Contest, has given us a short and very human novel about the various and simple people who live along the banks of the Maranon River in Peru. THE GOLDEN SERPENT is the story of the natives who live and work and die along the banks of the tricky and unpredictable river that flows through their land; a river that is dishonest, strange, but nevertheless the lifeblood of the people to whom it belongs, something which they all love and worship with the same irresistible fascination of the sailor for the sea. There is the episode of the two river men who try to shoot the rapids during the flood stage and become caught in the treacherous swirls and eddies so fly their raft becomes on a projecting rock, They move. They have provisions a few days. The water is so full of floating debris, hidden whirlpools other dangers that it would be folly to try to swim to land, Even if they did this, there would be no place for them to go, for the river at this point is lined by nothing but steep canyon walls, The days pass. Their supply of the sweet intoxicant-coca-is almost gone; there is little food and rum left. Finally one of them decides to make a dash for it. These two men on the raft are brothers and they love each other very much - the one does not want his brother to try to swim for help, but cannot prevent it, And what happens is an exciting and breath-taking story. Then there is the episode of the man who falls in love with the village belle and of how he eventually marries her. This is a very short tale, very charming, graceful, and with intriguing descriptions of how fascinating a young Peruvian beauty of 18 is when she bathes in the river in the nude. . . ! THE GOLDEN SERPENT is a rich, warm, and human book that anyone will enjoy reading. It is authentic, lively, and with a very special quality that many South American books don’t have, You will discover this when you begin reading.

Ciro Alegría Bazán (November 4, 1909 – February 17, 1967) was a Peruvian journalist, politician, and novelist. Born in Huamachuco District, he exposed the problems of the native Peruvians while learning about their way of life. This understanding of how they were oppressed was the focus for his novels. He attended classes at the University of Trujillo, and worked briefly as a journalist for the newspaper El Norte. In 1930 Alegría joined the Aprista movement, dedicated to social reform as well as improving the welfare of native Peruvians. He was imprisoned several times for his political activities before finally being exiled to Chile in 1934. He remained in exile in both Chile and later the United States up until 1948. Later, he taught at the University of Puerto Rico, and wrote about the Cuban revolution while in Cuba. His most well known novel, Broad and Alien is the World (1941) or El mundo es ancho y ajeno, won the Latin American Novel Prize in 1941, and brought him international attention. It depicts an Andean community, living in the Peruvian highlands. The book was later published in the United States and has been reprinted many times, in multiple languages. Alegría returned to Peru in 1957. He joined President Fernando Belaúnde Terry's party (Acción Popular) and was elected to the Chamber of Deputies in 1963. He died unexpectedly in Lima, Peru on February 17, 1967. After his death, his widow published many of his essays and reports he had written for various newspapers. He was 58 years old.
Alegria, Ciro. The Golden Serpent. New York. 1963. Signet/New American Library. Translated From The Spanish & With An Afterword By Harriet de Onis. 190 pages. paperback. CP114. Cover: Kossin

Unpredictably swift and menacing, unfathomable in its nature, the 'Golden Serpent' inspires reverence and terror in the tiny, scattered communities that border its banks - villages of peons pitched between pagan recklessness and Christian despair. Hardy agrarians, these people are prone to supernatural fears that arise from total dependence upon a river that bestows great gifts and, at times, destroys all that it has given. Here are the Andean peaks, surging rapids, river men, flower girls, fiestas, and mournful pipes. Here are the victims of avalanche and flood, witch hunts and plagues that corrode the mind and body. Ciro Alegria's lyric eloquence has produced a hypnotic vision of the remorseless Marañón country of Peru. In the words of Harriet de Onis, 'He has created a world peopled by beings teeming with life, with their sorrows and joys, their aspirations and defeats, and all suffused with that poetry which comes from emotion recalled in tranquillity. And when progress has spanned the turbulent Maranón with bridges, has dammed and channeled its treacherous waters, and the boatmen of Calemar have disappeared, their work done, The Golden Serpent will remain as a monument to the days when it ran free and bold, tamed only by brave men.'

Ciro Alegría Bazán (November 4, 1909 – February 17, 1967) was a Peruvian journalist, politician, and novelist. Born in Huamachuco District, he exposed the problems of the native Peruvians while learning about their way of life.
Alegria, Claribel & Flakoll, Darwin J. (editors and translators). On the Front Line: Guerrilla Poems of El Salvador. Willimantic. 1989. Curbstone Press. 0915306867. Bilingual. 91 pages. paperback. Cover design by Barbara Byers

This book is a collection of poems by Salvadoran revolutionists on the different fighting fronts of the FMLN who have from time to time put aside their rifles and taken up the pen to express the feelings evoked by the cruel, bloody struggle in which they are engaged. Some of them have fallen in the course of the Struggle. Others were established poets before they took up arms in the revolutionary cause. ON THE FRONT LINE contains poems by fine and committed poets, some well known and others not so well known, poems not by exalted individuals but by people like Julio, Jacobo, Hayde, Carmela and Ruth, all working to forge a richer collective future in a world which seeks to destroy collective action and hope.’ - Marc Zimmerman, author of EL SALVADOR AT WAR: A COLLAGE EPIC. CONTENTS; Introduction; Una Historia/A Story; A Vos/To You; Usted/You; A Vos Que Te Fuiste Al Frente/For You Who Went To The Front; A Las Sombra De Una Muchacha En Flor/Shadowed By A Blossoming Girl; Al Amor/To Love; Con Gusto Moriré/Fll Die Gladly; Hijos De America/Sons Of America; 9 De Nobiembre/November 9th; Que Es Poesia?/What Is Poetry?; Siempre Tuve/I Always Had; Compa Guerrillera/Compa Guerrillera; Hoy Estoy Aqui/Now I’m Here; Poema/Poem; Si La Muerte/If Death; Para Que Lo Entiendas De Una Vez/So You Understand Once And For All; Herencia/Bequeathment; Companera/Companera; Poema/Poem; Alfabetizar/To Alphabetize; Quienes Quedaron A Mitad Del Camino/Those Who Stopped Halfway; Acabo De Partir De Mi Mismo/I Just Walked Away Prom Myself; Tu Voz En Mi Mente/Your Voice In My Mind; Cumpleanos/Birthday; Embarazo/Pregnancy; Hay Dias/There Are Days; De Nuevo Usted Señor/And You Again, Good Sir; Porque Cuando Estoy Triste No Me Importa El Tiempo/Because When I’m Sad The Weather Doesn’t Bother Me; Las Calles De San Salvador/The Streets Of San Salvador. . .

Clara Isabel Alegría Vides (born May 12, 1924) is a Nicaraguan poet, essayist, novelist, and journalist who is a major voice in the literature of contemporary Central America. She writes under the pseudonym Claribel Alegría. She was awarded the 2006 Neustadt International Prize for Literature. Alegría was born in Estelí, Nicaragua and grew up in the Santa Ana area in western El Salvador. In 1943, she moved to the United States and in 1948 received a B.A. in Philosophy and Letters from George Washington University. Alegría was committed to nonviolent resistance. She had a close association with the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN), which overthrew Anastasio Somoza Debayle and took control of the Nicaraguan government in 1979. Alegría returned to Nicaragua in 1985 to aid in the reconstruction of Nicaragua. Alegría now lives in Managua, Nicaragua. Alegría's works of literature reflect the style of the popular literary current in Central America during the 1950s and 1960s, ‘la generacion comprometida’ (the committed generation). Her works follow the practice of several poets of her generation who are critical of their societies and make claims for rights using a language which is often counter-literary. Alegría has published many books of poetry: Casting Off (2003), Sorrow (1999), Umbrales (1996), Fuga de Canto Grande (1992) and La Mujer del Río (1989). Alegría has published novels and children's stories.
Alegria, Claribel & Flakoll, Darwin J. Ashes of Izalco. Willimantic. 1989. Curbstone Press. 0915306832. Translated from the Spanish by Darwin J. Flakoll. 173 pages. hardcover. Cover design by Bob Baldock

Written in two voices, ASHES OF IZALCO is the collaborative novel of Claribel Alegria and Darwin J. Flakoll based on the events of 1932 when thirty thousand Indians and peasants were massacred in Izalco, El Salvador. ASHES OF IZALCO brings together a Salvadoran woman and an American man who together struggle over issues of love, loyalty and socio-political injustices. About this book Claribel Alegria said in an interview: ‘ASHES OF IZALCO is a historical novel that my husband and I wrote together. It was based on what happened in 1932. I was a small child when it happened, but I still remember very well so many of these things. Thirty thousand campesinos were massacred in El Salvador in the name of anti-communism and it was a terrible thing. It was a thing that marred me as a child. The National Guard was right in front of my house and I saw when some of these peasants were brought in. And I heard when they were killed. I saw them go by with their thumbs tied behind their backs and then a little later I heard the shots. I started learning at a tender age about these terrible injustices. That was in 1932, but the sad thing is that right now the economic and the social injustices are just the same. The only difference now is that the people know better how to organize themselves. And so there is more hope for them. But this is why I think the novel is still very much alive.’ . Claribel Alegria was born on May 12,1924 in Esteli, Nicaragua, but considers herself Salvadoran since she moved early in her life to Santa Ana, El Salvador where she grew up. She has become a major voice in the struggle for liberation in El Salvador, and in Central America. She has published 10 volumes of poetry, 3 short novels and a book of children’s stories in Spanish, and translations of her work have been published in France, Holland, England and the U.S. Her poetry book, Sobrevivo, won the 1978 Casa de las Americas Prize. Darwin J. Flakoll was born on February 20, 1923 in Wendte, South Dakota. He served as a deck officer aboard destroyers during World War II. Following the war, he was Washington correspondent for a number of western newspapers and assistant bureau manager of Western Reporters News Agency before moving to Mexico City in 1950 where he worked as managing editor of the Mexico City Daily News. In 1953, at the beginning of his collaborative work with Claribel Alegria, Flakoll served as second secretary of the embassy in Montevideo and Buenos Aires before returning to newspaper work as a foreign correspondent for International Feature Service. Claribel Alegria and Darwin J. Flakoll met during their studies at George Washington University and subsequently got married. They moved to Malloca in 1966. Since 1979, they have lived in Managua, Nicaragua. Over the years, they have collaborated on 9 books of testimony, Latin American history and literary anthologies. . .

Clara Isabel Alegría Vides (born May 12, 1924) is a Nicaraguan poet, essayist, novelist, and journalist who is a major voice in the literature of contemporary Central America. She writes under the pseudonym Claribel Alegría. She was awarded the 2006 Neustadt International Prize for Literature. Alegría was born in Estelí, Nicaragua and grew up in the Santa Ana area in western El Salvador. In 1943, she moved to the United States and in 1948 received a B.A. in Philosophy and Letters from George Washington University. Alegría was committed to nonviolent resistance. She had a close association with the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN), which overthrew Anastasio Somoza Debayle and took control of the Nicaraguan government in 1979. Alegría returned to Nicaragua in 1985 to aid in the reconstruction of Nicaragua. Alegría now lives in Managua, Nicaragua. Alegría's works of literature reflect the style of the popular literary current in Central America during the 1950s and 1960s, ‘la generacion comprometida’ (the committed generation). Her works follow the practice of several poets of her generation who are critical of their societies and make claims for rights using a language which is often counter-literary. Alegría has published many books of poetry: Casting Off (2003), Sorrow (1999), Umbrales (1996), Fuga de Canto Grande (1992) and La Mujer del Río (1989). Alegría has published novels and children's stories.
Alegria, Claribel and Flakoll, Darwin. Death of Somoza. Willimantic. 1996. Curbstone Press. 1880684268. 161 pages. paperback. Cover design by Les Kanturek

DEATH OF SOMOZA reveals the inside story of the assassination of Somoza in Asuncion, Paraguay in 1980. Alegria and Flakoll, on the recommendation of Julio Cortázar, met ‘Ramon,’ a leader in the Argentinian Revolutionary Workers’ Party (PRT) and with his help were able to interview all the survivors of the commando team that carried out the ‘bringing to justice’ of Somoza. Alegria and Flakoll then rewove these testimonies into a narrative that reads like an thriller, as well as giving a vivid picture of the political and social climate of the time. Enlivened by its colorful cast of characters, Death of Somoza is the definitive account of how Anastasio Somoza Debayle was brought to justice. This story is not an apology for terrorism, but rather the chronicle of a tyrannicide.

Clara Isabel Alegría Vides (born May 12, 1924) is a Nicaraguan poet, essayist, novelist, and journalist who is a major voice in the literature of contemporary Central America. She writes under the pseudonym Claribel Alegría. She was awarded the 2006 Neustadt International Prize for Literature. Alegría was born in Estelí, Nicaragua and grew up in the Santa Ana area in western El Salvador. In 1943, she moved to the United States and in 1948 received a B.A. in Philosophy and Letters from George Washington University. Alegría was committed to nonviolent resistance. She had a close association with the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN), which overthrew Anastasio Somoza Debayle and took control of the Nicaraguan government in 1979. Alegría returned to Nicaragua in 1985 to aid in the reconstruction of Nicaragua. Alegría now lives in Managua, Nicaragua. Alegría's works of literature reflect the style of the popular literary current in Central America during the 1950s and 1960s, ‘la generacion comprometida’ (the committed generation). Her works follow the practice of several poets of her generation who are critical of their societies and make claims for rights using a language which is often counter-literary. Alegría has published many books of poetry: Casting Off (2003), Sorrow (1999), Umbrales (1996), Fuga de Canto Grande (1992) and La Mujer del Río (1989). Alegría has published novels and children's stories.
Alegria, Claribel. Flowers Form the Volcano/Flores Del Volcan. Pittsburgh. 1982. University Of Pittsburgh Press. 0822934698. Bilingual. Translated from the Spanish by Carolyn Forche. 87 pages. hardcover.

The first translation of one of Alegría’s works into English was Flores del volcán/Flowers from the Volcano, a bilingual edition. It is through the efforts of the translator, prizewinning poet Carolyn Forché, that Alegría first came to the attention of readers in the United States. Many of the poems chosen for this collection come from the 1978 collection Sobrevivo. The title of the work is an indication of its contents: The volcano represents Central America as a region and El Salvador as a country, as part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, but the volcano also represents the eruption, violence, and death caused by the civil wars of the 1970’s and 1980’s in Nicaragua, Guatemala, and El Salvador, while flowers suggest beauty, hope, and life. In the title poem, Flowers from the Volcano, Alegría critiques the class structure in El Salvador, in which the volcano’s children/ flow down like lava/ with their bouquets of flowers, threatening the status quo of the well-to-do, the owners of two-story houses/ protected from thieves by walls, who drown their fears in whiskey. She remembers the dead in Sorrow, with its rosary of names, including Roque Dalton, the Salvadoran poet killed by government forces in 1975, and the Chilean folksinger Victor Jara, killed by security forces in the stadium of Santiago in 1973, along with many other Chileans. Flowers from the Volcano contains some poems of nostalgic recollection of life in Santa Ana in simpler times, but the collection principally engages notions of class struggle and the brutal repression of liberty and life. As Forché notes in the volume’s preface, five years passed between the summer that she and Alegría worked on the book and its publication, and in those five years more than 40,000 people . . . died in El Salvador at the hands of security forces. CONTENTS: Preface; Hacia la edad jurásica/Toward the Jurassic Age; Santa Ana a oscuras/Santa Ana in the Dark; Sorrow/Sorrow; Flores del volcán/Flowers from the Volcano; Eramos tres/We Were Three; Se hace tarde doctor/It’ s Growing Late, Doctor; Carta al tiempo/Letter to Time; Soy raiz/I Am Root; Mis adioses/My Good-byes; Notes; Biographical Notes.

Claribel Alegria was born in Esteli, Nicaragua in 1924, but she considers herself Salvadoran because she went to live in El Salvador when she was a year old. She came to the United States in 1943 and earned her B.A. from George Washington University. She married Darwin J. Flakoll in 1947. They now live in Deya, Mallorca. Her books of poetry include Anillo de Silencio, Suite, Vigilias, Acuario, Huesped de mi Tiempo, Via Unica, Aprendizaje, Pagare a cobrar y otras poemas, Raices, and Sobrevivo. A selected poems, Suma y sigue (antologia), appeared from Visor Madrid in 1981 and her translations of North American poets, Nuevas voces do Norteamerica, appeared from Plaza & Janes, S.A., the same year. In 1978, Claribel Alegria was awarded the Casa de las Americas Prize in Havana, Cuba. . Carolyn Forché was born in 1950 in Detroit. Her first book of poems, GATHERING THE TRIBES, won the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award in 1975. Between 1978 and 1980 she worked as a journalist and human rights investigator in El Salvador. In 1981 she received the di Castagnola Award from the Poetry Society of America for the working manuscript of her second book of poems. When THE COUNTRY BETWEEN US appeared from the Copper Canyon Press and Harper & Row, Publishers, Inc., in 1982, the Academy of American Poets awarded it their Lamont Selection. She has held Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Arts fellowships and is currently living in Charlottesville, Virginia.
Alegria, Claribel. Fugues. Willimantic. 1993. Curbstone Press. 1880684101. Translated from the Spanish by Darwin J. Flakoll. 143 pages. paperback. Front Cover: 'Prometeo', 1959 Mural, acrylic on canvas by Rufino Tamayo. Design by Stone Graphics.

In FUGUES, a lucid and strikingly beautiful new collection, she looks squarely into the face of mortality, love, and aging, to explore the personal as well as universal questions that face each human being. CONTENTS: Lluvia/Rain; In memoriam/In Memoriam; Evasiones/Evasions; Savoir Faire/Savoir Faire; Tanka/Tanka; Espejeos/Mirror Image; Amor/Love; Contabilizando/Accounting; Hoy lo sé/Now I Know; Ars Poética/ars Poetica; Erosion/Erosion; Visitas nocturnas/Nocturnal Visits;Silencio/Silence; Y si nazco?/If I Am Born; La abuela/The Grandmother; Piedad/Have Pity; Deafio/Challenge; Carta a un desterrado/Letter To An Exile; No importa que no estes/No matter; La intrusa/The Intruder; Proverbio persa/Persian Proverb; Ira Demetrae/Ira Demetrae; Augurios/Portents; Unicornio Cimarron/Unbridled Unicorn; Galatea ante el espejo/Galatea before the Mirror; Soy/I Am; Deseo/Desire; Incertidumbre/Uncertainty; Persefone/Persephone; Como no amarte?/Why Not Love You; Resurrección/Resurrection; Nostalgias/Nostalgia; La Malinche/Malinche; El espejo/The Mirror; Ambivalencias/Amhivalences; Por qué?/What; Pandora/Pandora; Luna vieja/Old Moon; Perplejidad/Perplexity; Igloolik/Igloolik; Los rios/The Rivers; Hecate/Hecate; Pasando revista/Thinking Back; Estrella inalcanzahle/Unreachable Star; Frustraciones/Frustrations; Haciendo maletas/Packing My Bags; Sala de transito/Transit Lounge. . Well-known for her incisive descriptions of war and violence in El Salvador, Claribel Alegria is one of Central America’s most eminent poets.

Clara Isabel Alegría Vides (born May 12, 1924) is a Nicaraguan poet, essayist, novelist, and journalist who is a major voice in the literature of contemporary Central America. She writes under the pseudonym Claribel Alegría. She was awarded the 2006 Neustadt International Prize for Literature. Alegría was born in Estelí, Nicaragua and grew up in the Santa Ana area in western El Salvador. In 1943, she moved to the United States and in 1948 received a B.A. in Philosophy and Letters from George Washington University. Alegría was committed to nonviolent resistance. She had a close association with the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN), which overthrew Anastasio Somoza Debayle and took control of the Nicaraguan government in 1979. Alegría returned to Nicaragua in 1985 to aid in the reconstruction of Nicaragua. Alegría now lives in Managua, Nicaragua. Alegría's works of literature reflect the style of the popular literary current in Central America during the 1950s and 1960s, ‘la generacion comprometida’ (the committed generation). Her works follow the practice of several poets of her generation who are critical of their societies and make claims for rights using a language which is often counter-literary. Alegría has published many books of poetry: Casting Off (2003), Sorrow (1999), Umbrales (1996), Fuga de Canto Grande (1992) and La Mujer del Río (1989). Alegría has published novels and children's stories.
Alegria, Claribel. Luisa in Realityland. Willimantic. 1987. Curbstone Press. 0915306700. Translated from the Spanish by Darwin J. Flakoll. 159 pages. hardcover. Cover design by Stone Graphics

LUISA IN REALITYLAND, an autobiographical prose/versenovel by Claribel Alegria, one of Central America’s most highly acclaimed authors, is a retrospect of the real, surreal and magical memories of childhood in El Salvador, into which the ugly realities of war gradually intrude. LUISA IN REALITYLAND is printed on acid-free paper in an edition of 2500 copies by Curbstone Press of which 100 numbered copies are signed by the author and the translator.

Clara Isabel Alegría Vides (born May 12, 1924) is a Nicaraguan poet, essayist, novelist, and journalist who is a major voice in the literature of contemporary Central America.
Alegria, Claribel. They Won't Take Me Alive. London. 1987. The Women's Press. 0704340283. Translated from the Spanish by Amanda Hopkinson. 145 pages. paperback. Cover illustration by Victoria Ortiz

This is the triumphant story of the life and death of Commander Eugenia of the Salvadorean guerilla forces, as seen through the eyes of her comrades, and told by one of El Salvador’s foremost writers.

Clara Isabel Alegría Vides (born May 12, 1924) is a Nicaraguan poet, essayist, novelist, and journalist who is a major voice in the literature of contemporary Central America. She writes under the pseudonym Claribel Alegría. She was awarded the 2006 Neustadt International Prize for Literature. Alegría was born in Estelí, Nicaragua and grew up in the Santa Ana area in western El Salvador. In 1943, she moved to the United States and in 1948 received a B.A. in Philosophy and Letters from George Washington University. Alegría was committed to nonviolent resistance. She had a close association with the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN), which overthrew Anastasio Somoza Debayle and took control of the Nicaraguan government in 1979. Alegría returned to Nicaragua in 1985 to aid in the reconstruction of Nicaragua. Alegría now lives in Managua, Nicaragua. Alegría's works of literature reflect the style of the popular literary current in Central America during the 1950s and 1960s, ‘la generacion comprometida’ (the committed generation). Her works follow the practice of several poets of her generation who are critical of their societies and make claims for rights using a language which is often counter-literary. Alegría has published many books of poetry: Casting Off (2003), Sorrow (1999), Umbrales (1996), Fuga de Canto Grande (1992) and La Mujer del Río (1989). Alegría has published novels and children's stories.
Alegria, Claribel. Thresholds/Umbrales: A Bilingual Poetry Edition. Willimantic. 1996. Curbstone Press. 1880684365. Translated from the Spanish by Darwin Flakoll. 69 pages. paperback. Cover design & illustration by Stephanie Church

THRESHOLDS/UMBRALES distills the life and thought of El Salvador’s most beloved poet in a triumph of lyricism. CONTENTS: La ceiba/The Ceiba; El rio/The River; Abeja-reina/Queen Bee; Merlin/Merlin; La torre/The Tower; Vasija y fuente/Chalice and Fount; La coyota/The Coyote; Ojo de cuervo/The Crow’s Eye; La mariposa/The Butterfly.

Clara Isabel Alegría Vides (born May 12, 1924) is a Nicaraguan poet, essayist, novelist, and journalist who is a major voice in the literature of contemporary Central America. She writes under the pseudonym Claribel Alegría. She was awarded the 2006 Neustadt International Prize for Literature. Alegría was born in Estelí, Nicaragua and grew up in the Santa Ana area in western El Salvador. In 1943, she moved to the United States and in 1948 received a B.A. in Philosophy and Letters from George Washington University. Alegría was committed to nonviolent resistance. She had a close association with the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN), which overthrew Anastasio Somoza Debayle and took control of the Nicaraguan government in 1979. Alegría returned to Nicaragua in 1985 to aid in the reconstruction of Nicaragua. Alegría now lives in Managua, Nicaragua. Alegría's works of literature reflect the style of the popular literary current in Central America during the 1950s and 1960s, ‘la generacion comprometida’ (the committed generation). Her works follow the practice of several poets of her generation who are critical of their societies and make claims for rights using a language which is often counter-literary. Alegría has published many books of poetry: Casting Off (2003), Sorrow (1999), Umbrales (1996), Fuga de Canto Grande (1992) and La Mujer del Río (1989). Alegría has published novels and children's stories.
Alegria, Fernando (editor). Chilean Writers in Exile. Trumansburg. 1982. Crossing Press. 0895940604. 162 pages. paperback. Cover illustration by Rene Castro

After the military coup that overthrew the constitutional government of President Salvador Allende on September 11,1973, a brutal repression began in Chile against all forms of democratic expression. The consequences of this ruthless onslaught have been devastating. Thousands of university professors, intellectuals, artists, and professionals went into exile . . . Chilean culture in exile is very much alive and productive. This anthology is the expression of a group of writers who, in spite of all hardships, are producing vigorous statements on behalf of the Chilean people.’ - from the Foreword by Fernando Alegria. CONTENTS: THE FIRST DAYS by Alfonso Gonzalez Dagnino; OF FLIGHTS AND ABIDINGS by Juan A. Epple; BARBED WIRE FENCE by Anibal Quijada; WAR CHORALE by Fernando Alegria; LIKE THE HYENA by Poli Delano; ST. ELIZABETH by Claudio Giaconi; MY BEAUTIFUL BUENOS AIRES by Leandro Urbina; PUTAMADRE by Ariel Dorfman. . Fernando Alegria, the editor, is a Chilean novelist, poet and critic. He has won many prizes for his literary works, among them the Latin American Prize for Literature, the Municipal Prize in Chile and others. In 1980 the Hispanic Caucus of the U.S. Congress awarded him a diploma for his contribution in the field of Hispanic Culture in the U.S. Between 1970-1973 he was the cultural attache to the Chilean Embassy in Washington, D.C. Currently he is Professor of Latin American Literature at Stanford University. His latest novel, Chilean Spring, was published by the Latin American Literary Review Press. The N.Y. Times Book Review, May 11, 1980, said that CHILEAN SPRING is ‘a poignant elegy to a nation whose future has been taken from it. That Mr. Alegria accomplishes so much so effectively in so few pages is a remarkable achievement.’ . .

Fernando Alegría (Santiago de Chile, 26 September, 1918 - Walnut Creek, California, October 29, 2005) was a Chilean poet, writer, literary critic and scholar. Alegría grew up in the Independencia barrio of the city. Poets from this barrio include Pablo Neruda, Violeta Parra and Volodia Teitelboim. He received an M.A. from Bowling Green State University in 1941 and a Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley, in 1947. From 1964-1967, Alegría was a professor at the University of California in Berkeley. From 1967 to 1998 he was a professor at Stanford University and for many years he was Chair of the Spanish and Portuguese Language Departments there. He sat on the Board of Trustees at the Western Institute for Social Research (WISR) for about twenty years beginning with its inception in 1975. Alegría served as cultural attaché from the government of Salvador Allende to the United States from 1970 to 1973. He was the representative of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language in the United States for many years. Among the many awards he received is the Latin American Prize of Literature. A documentary film about the life of Chile’s revolutionary poet Alegría, ¡Viva Chile Mierda!, was produced in 2004. The documentary is a humanistic portrayal of one of the most influential figures from Chile and a key figure in the advancement of Latino culture in the United States of America. Alegría’s ‘Viva Chile Mierda’, the most recited poem of the Allende era, was written in the 1960s.
Alegria, Fernando (editor). Chilean Writers in Exile. Trumansburg. 1982. Crossing Press. 0895940590. 162 pages. hardcover. Cover illustration by Rene Castro

After the military coup that overthrew the constitutional government of President Salvador Allende on September 11,1973, a brutal repression began in Chile against all forms of democratic expression. The consequences of this ruthless onslaught have been devastating. Thousands of university professors, intellectuals, artists, and professionals went into exile . . . Chilean culture in exile is very much alive and productive. This anthology is the expression of a group of writers who, in spite of all hardships, are producing vigorous statements on behalf of the Chilean people.’ - from the Foreword by Fernando Alegria. CONTENTS: THE FIRST DAYS by Alfonso Gonzalez Dagnino; OF FLIGHTS AND ABIDINGS by Juan A. Epple; BARBED WIRE FENCE by Anibal Quijada; WAR CHORALE by Fernando Alegria; LIKE THE HYENA by Poli Delano; ST. ELIZABETH by Claudio Giaconi; MY BEAUTIFUL BUENOS AIRES by Leandro Urbina; PUTAMADRE by Ariel Dorfman. . Fernando Alegria, the editor, is a Chilean novelist, poet and critic. He has won many prizes for his literary works, among them the Latin American Prize for Literature, the Municipal Prize in Chile and others. In 1980 the Hispanic Caucus of the U.S. Congress awarded him a diploma for his contribution in the field of Hispanic Culture in the U.S. Between 1970-1973 he was the cultural attache to the Chilean Embassy in Washington, D.C. Currently he is Professor of Latin American Literature at Stanford University. His latest novel, Chilean Spring, was published by the Latin American Literary Review Press. The N.Y. Times Book Review, May 11, 1980, said that CHILEAN SPRING is ‘a poignant elegy to a nation whose future has been taken from it. That Mr. Alegria accomplishes so much so effectively in so few pages is a remarkable achievement.’ . .

Fernando Alegría (Santiago de Chile, 26 September, 1918 - Walnut Creek, California, October 29, 2005) was a Chilean poet, writer, literary critic and scholar. Alegría grew up in the Independencia barrio of the city. Poets from this barrio include Pablo Neruda, Violeta Parra and Volodia Teitelboim. He received an M.A. from Bowling Green State University in 1941 and a Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley, in 1947. From 1964-1967, Alegría was a professor at the University of California in Berkeley. From 1967 to 1998 he was a professor at Stanford University and for many years he was Chair of the Spanish and Portuguese Language Departments there. He sat on the Board of Trustees at the Western Institute for Social Research (WISR) for about twenty years beginning with its inception in 1975. Alegría served as cultural attaché from the government of Salvador Allende to the United States from 1970 to 1973. He was the representative of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language in the United States for many years. Among the many awards he received is the Latin American Prize of Literature. A documentary film about the life of Chile’s revolutionary poet Alegría, ¡Viva Chile Mierda!, was produced in 2004. The documentary is a humanistic portrayal of one of the most influential figures from Chile and a key figure in the advancement of Latino culture in the United States of America. Alegría’s ‘Viva Chile Mierda’, the most recited poem of the Allende era, was written in the 1960s.
Alegria, Fernando. 10 Pastoral Psalms. San Francisco. 1967. Kayak/City Lights. Drawings by Suzanne Vanlandingham. Translated from the Spanish by Bernardo Garcia & Matthew Zion. [unpaginated]. paperback. Cover: Suzanne Vanlandingham

A collection of 10 erotic poems from Chilean poet Fernando Alegria.

Fernando Alegría (Santiago de Chile, 26 September, 1918 - Walnut Creek, California, October 29, 2005) was a Chilean poet, writer, literary critic and scholar. Alegría grew up in the Independencia barrio of the city. Poets from this barrio include Pablo Neruda, Violeta Parra and Volodia Teitelboim. He received an M.A. from Bowling Green State University in 1941 and a Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley, in 1947. From 1964-1967, Alegría was a professor at the University of California in Berkeley. From 1967 to 1998 he was a professor at Stanford University and for many years he was Chair of the Spanish and Portuguese Language Departments there. He sat on the Board of Trustees at the Western Institute for Social Research (WISR) for about twenty years beginning with its inception in 1975. Alegría served as cultural attaché from the government of Salvador Allende to the United States from 1970 to 1973. He was the representative of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language in the United States for many years. Among the many awards he received is the Latin American Prize of Literature. A documentary film about the life of Chile’s revolutionary poet Alegría, ¡Viva Chile Mierda!, was produced in 2004. The documentary is a humanistic portrayal of one of the most influential figures from Chile and a key figure in the advancement of Latino culture in the United States of America. Alegría’s ‘Viva Chile Mierda’, the most recited poem of the Allende era, was written in the 1960s.
Alegria, Fernando. Changing Centuries: Selected Poems. Pittsburgh. 1984. Latin American Literary Review Press. 0935480153. Bilingual. Translated from the Spanish by Stephen Kessler. 133 pages. paperback.

‘Fernando Alegría, critic and novelist, reveals his talents as a poet in this bilingual Spanish/English collection of thirty-eight poems. Characterized by a diversity of tone, imagery, and form, the selections include intimately personal lyrics on home and a grandson as well as public, politically committed verse extolling fallen heroes. With gentle modulations, his voice covers a broad spectrum that ranges from the nostalgic to the prophetic. An important collection, which will appropriately complement Alegría's The Chilean Spring.’ - Choice. ‘Over a period that spans nearly fifty years, Fernando Alegría has become one of Latin America's foremost poets and novelists, and his essays are essential contributions to the study of Latin American literature. .Passion drives the poetry in Changing Centuries. Rage and love load the poems with images successively transformed by metaphor. Though they sometimes seem dangerously out of control, the poems in this collection move at an incredible velocity and go straight for the human heart.’ - Latin American Book Review. . . ‘It seems that for some time we have had a world-class poet living quietly in our midst, a poet who belongs in the company of Ritsos, Herbert, Parra. It is difficult to read Alegría's poems without weeping over the fate of Chile, and a lost world.’-New York Times Book Review. CONTENTS: I. Jardin de la Ceiba/La Ceiba Gardens; Carta Magna/Magna Carta; Museo en Coyoacán/Museum in Coyoacan; Casa de Frida y Diego/The House of Frida and Diego; II. Juegos Infantiles/Children’s Games; El rey y el turista con sus ninos en la playa/The King and the Tourist with Their Children on the Beach; Tahoe/Tahoe; Palabras en el sepelio del General Luco/Words on the Burial of General Luco; Washington, D.C./Washington, D. C; Pablo, 1,/Pablo, 1; Pablo, 2/Pablo, 2; III. Mesoamerica/Mesoamerica; Los inventores del pals/Inventors of the Country; Carta de Relación/Report to the Ruler; La fuente de la juventud/The Fountain of Youth; La caida de un obispo/The Fall of a Bishop; Donde lloran los valientes/Where Brave Men Weep; IV. De los desaparecidos es el reino de la tierra/The Disappeared; Will Inherit the Earth; Acto de desaparición/Disappearing Act; Los viejos estandartes/The Old Banners; Otro fantasma recorre el mundo/Another Specter is Haunting the World; V. Elegia a Orlando Letelier/Elegy for Orlando Letelier; Sueno del combatiente/The Fighter’s Dream; Pablo/Pablo; Homenaje a los heroes caidos en el Externado San José/Homage to the Heroes Fallen at San Jose School; VI. Me preguntas/You Ask Me; Qué tengo en mis brazos?/What Do I Have in My Arms; Suspendido en el aire/Suspended in Air; La ciguena dice/The Stork Speaks; El milagro cabe/The Miracle Fits; Nino veloz/Fleeting Child; Qué misterio/What Mystery; Sol pequeno/Little Sun; Nocturno/Nocturne; VII. Basta con un poco/A Little Is Enough; Llevaré mis flores/I’ll Carry My Flowers; Es lo minimo/It’s the Small Things; Regreso/Return; NOTAS. Most of these poems originally appeared in Instrucciones para desnudar ala raza humana (Editorial Nueva Imagen, Mexico). Some of these translations first appeared in the following magazines, whose editors are gratefully acknowledged: Alcatraz, the American Poetry Review, Compages, Five Fingers Poetry, and Montana Gothic.

Fernando Alegría (Santiago de Chile, 26 September, 1918 - Walnut Creek, California, October 29, 2005) was a Chilean poet, writer, literary critic and scholar. Alegría grew up in the Independencia barrio of the city. Poets from this barrio include Pablo Neruda, Violeta Parra and Volodia Teitelboim. He received an M.A. from Bowling Green State University in 1941 and a Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley, in 1947. From 1964-1967, Alegría was a professor at the University of California in Berkeley. From 1967 to 1998 he was a professor at Stanford University and for many years he was Chair of the Spanish and Portuguese Language Departments there. He sat on the Board of Trustees at the Western Institute for Social Research (WISR) for about twenty years beginning with its inception in 1975. Alegría served as cultural attaché from the government of Salvador Allende to the United States from 1970 to 1973. He was the representative of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language in the United States for many years. Among the many awards he received is the Latin American Prize of Literature. A documentary film about the life of Chile’s revolutionary poet Alegría, ¡Viva Chile Mierda!, was produced in 2004. The documentary is a humanistic portrayal of one of the most influential figures from Chile and a key figure in the advancement of Latino culture in the United States of America. Alegría’s ‘Viva Chile Mierda’, the most recited poem of the Allende era, was written in the 1960s.
Alegria, Fernando. Instructions For Undressing the Human Race. Santa Cruz. [no date]. Kayak. Drawings by Matta. Translated from the Spanish by Matthew Zion & Lennart Bruce. unpaginated. paperback.

PRASIE FOR ALEGRIA'S PREVIOUS WORK - 'Over a period that spans nearly fifty years, Fernando Alegría has become one of Latin America's foremost poets and novelists, and his essays are essential contributions to the study of Latin American literature. .Passion drives the poetry in Changing Centuries. Rage and love load the poems with images successively transformed by metaphor. Though they sometimes seem dangerously out of control, the poems in this collection move at an incredible velocity and go straight for the human heart.’ - Latin American Book Review.

Fernando Alegría (Santiago de Chile, 26 September, 1918 - Walnut Creek, California, October 29, 2005) was a Chilean poet, writer, literary critic and scholar. Alegría grew up in the Independencia barrio of the city. Poets from this barrio include Pablo Neruda, Violeta Parra and Volodia Teitelboim. He received an M.A. from Bowling Green State University in 1941 and a Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley, in 1947. From 1964-1967, Alegría was a professor at the University of California in Berkeley. From 1967 to 1998 he was a professor at Stanford University and for many years he was Chair of the Spanish and Portuguese Language Departments there. He sat on the Board of Trustees at the Western Institute for Social Research (WISR) for about twenty years beginning with its inception in 1975. Alegría served as cultural attaché from the government of Salvador Allende to the United States from 1970 to 1973. He was the representative of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language in the United States for many years. Among the many awards he received is the Latin American Prize of Literature. A documentary film about the life of Chile’s revolutionary poet Alegría, ¡Viva Chile Mierda!, was produced in 2004. The documentary is a humanistic portrayal of one of the most influential figures from Chile and a key figure in the advancement of Latino culture in the United States of America. Alegría’s ‘Viva Chile Mierda’, the most recited poem of the Allende era, was written in the 1960s.
Alegria, Fernando. Lautaro. New York. 1944. Farrar & Rinehart. Illustrated by Juan Oliver. This Novel Was The Juvenile Prize Winner In The Second Latin American Literary Prize Competition. Translated from the Spanish by Delia Goetz. 176 pages. hardcover.

Set in 16th century Chile, this is the epic of Lautaro, an Araucanian Indian who fought bravely for the liberation of his people. LAUTARO was the juvenile prize winner in the Second Latin American Literary Prize Competition. Other winners have been CANAPE-VERT by Philippe Thoby-Marcelin & Pierre Marcelin, a novel of Haiti, and ENRIQUETA AND I, an autobiography by Argentina Diaz Lozano, from Honduras.

Fernando Alegría (Santiago de Chile, 26 September, 1918 - Walnut Creek, California, October 29, 2005) was a Chilean poet, writer, literary critic and scholar. Alegría grew up in the Independencia barrio of the city. Poets from this barrio include Pablo Neruda, Violeta Parra and Volodia Teitelboim. He received an M.A. from Bowling Green State University in 1941 and a Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley, in 1947. From 1964-1967, Alegría was a professor at the University of California in Berkeley. From 1967 to 1998 he was a professor at Stanford University and for many years he was Chair of the Spanish and Portuguese Language Departments there. He sat on the Board of Trustees at the Western Institute for Social Research (WISR) for about twenty years beginning with its inception in 1975. Alegría served as cultural attaché from the government of Salvador Allende to the United States from 1970 to 1973. He was the representative of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language in the United States for many years. Among the many awards he received is the Latin American Prize of Literature. A documentary film about the life of Chile’s revolutionary poet Alegría, ¡Viva Chile Mierda!, was produced in 2004. The documentary is a humanistic portrayal of one of the most influential figures from Chile and a key figure in the advancement of Latino culture in the United States of America. Alegría’s ‘Viva Chile Mierda’, the most recited poem of the Allende era, was written in the 1960s.
Alegria, Fernando. My Horse Gonzalez. New York. 1964. Las Americas Publishing Company. Translated from the Spanish by Carlos Lozano. 187 pages. hardcover.

This is such a horsy book that it is hard to believe the author has ever done anything in his life except hang around racing stables. However, in his native Chile - and in France and Italy where this and other works by Alegria have appeared in translation - he is known and respected as an essayist, critic, novelist, short story writer, and poet. But indeed, he shows himself to be a poet in this very book, for surely few authors have ever described horses and horse races with more poetic feeling; and San Francisco owes Alegria a laurel crown, at least, for the many poetic descriptions of that Queen city of the West, whether glimpsed in early morning or late at night, in fog or sunshine. As one critic said, reviewing the novel when it first appeared in the original Spanish, ‘The uneasy fascination of this ‘town without a map,’ poised at the dock’s edge as if at any moment it might move on and leave one behind, is so potent that the narrator - a young Chilean who made his way to the States to study and instead finds himself washing dishes in a dreary restaurant - is driven to exclaim: ‘Why, you can be living in San Francisco and still feel homesick for it!’’ (Dorothy Hayes de Huneeus, in Americas, September, 1958). Whether or not you have already fallen under the spell of horses and horse racing, you can read this novel with pleasure for the story of young romance that is a part of it, for the odd assortment of human beings that swarm in its pages, and for the wry humor, compassion, and poetic feeling brought to the telling of the tale, Alegria here gives us an unusual point of vantage from which to view the human comedy. And the translator has skillfully leapt the language barrier; this English version can be read with undiluted enjoyment. This is a story of a horse with an eccentric personality. You may not be crazy about horses; but you will be, about that crazy horse, Gonzalez. FERNANDO ALEGRIA, who writes with such affection of San Francisco in the present novel, is no newcomer to the North American scene. In 1938, at the age of twenty, he was a delegate from his native Chile to the World Youth Congress held at Vassar College. A few years later, after completing his studies at the University of Chile, he returned to the States, to do post-graduate work at the University of California, from which he received his Ph.D. In 1943, his historical novel for juveniles, Lautaro, received first prize in the Second Latin-American Literary Contest (Segundo Concurso Literario Latinoamericano) sponsored jointly by Farrar & Rinehart and the Pan-American Union; this first book has been translated into English, Portuguese, Czech, and other European languages and is regarded as a classic. In 1947, on a Guggenheim scholarship, he wrote Watt Whitman en Hispano America, He is known and esteemed throughout Latin America as the author of several published collections of poems and literary essays, five novels, contributions to many magazines, and as one of the editors of Revista Iberoamericana, His writing career reached a peak with the publication of Cabalio de Copa, which we now present in English translation as My Horse, Gonzalez, for it was immediately awarded the most important prize any novel can receive in Chile (the Premio Municipal, conferred by the Academia Chilena de Ia Lenqua), and was a bestseller not only throughout Latin America but in France (where it was called tout Cheval), We confidently predict that this novel about horses and women, an often hilarious and always absorbing tale, will bring him the fame he deserves in his adopted land, the U.S.A. . (original title: Cabalio de Copa).

Fernando Alegría (Santiago de Chile, 26 September, 1918 - Walnut Creek, California, October 29, 2005) was a Chilean poet, writer, literary critic and scholar. Alegría grew up in the Independencia barrio of the city. Poets from this barrio include Pablo Neruda, Violeta Parra and Volodia Teitelboim. He received an M.A. from Bowling Green State University in 1941 and a Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley, in 1947. From 1964-1967, Alegría was a professor at the University of California in Berkeley. From 1967 to 1998 he was a professor at Stanford University and for many years he was Chair of the Spanish and Portuguese Language Departments there. He sat on the Board of Trustees at the Western Institute for Social Research (WISR) for about twenty years beginning with its inception in 1975. Alegría served as cultural attaché from the government of Salvador Allende to the United States from 1970 to 1973. He was the representative of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language in the United States for many years. Among the many awards he received is the Latin American Prize of Literature. A documentary film about the life of Chile’s revolutionary poet Alegría, ¡Viva Chile Mierda!, was produced in 2004. The documentary is a humanistic portrayal of one of the most influential figures from Chile and a key figure in the advancement of Latino culture in the United States of America. Alegría’s ‘Viva Chile Mierda’, the most recited poem of the Allende era, was written in the 1960s.
Alegria, Fernando. The Maypole Warriors. Pittsburgh. 1993. Latin American Literary Review Press. 0935480587. Translated from the Spanish by Carlos Lozano. 192 pages. paperback. Cover: Dr. Mary Hufty

THE MAYPOLE WARRIORS gives a spectral vision of the most impressive events of the 30s and 40s, focusing on the artistic revolution in Chile and the role played in it by legendary figures such as Pablo Neruda and Vicente Huidobro. The novel also analyzes in depth the crisis of two old Chilean families who live in their young progeny the consequences of their social displacement. In a strikingly contemporary approach, the novel presents Juan Luis and Elisa, who at a time and in a country weighted with the social consequences of abortion, make the decision that only they could make . . . ‘. . . [a] visionary new novel . . . Alegria’s Chile is eerily akin to the Civil War-Spain in Man’s Hope by Andre Malraux . . . Alegria’s prose, however, is more lyrical . . . He is deft at finding the evocative metaphor, the searing image. In a stylish translation by Lozano, the book will capture both the reader’s attention and conscience.’ - Publishers Weekly. the novel allows us a glimpse of a country that is the home of the Nobel-laureate Pablo Neruda (who appears in its pages), that at one time had one of the oldest democracies in the Americas, but that has more recently [undergone] tumult.’ - Booklist. Chilean novelist, essayist, poet and literary critic, FERNANDO ALEGRIA is currently Emeritus Professor in the Humanities at Stanford University. Originally a realist, he has excelled in magic realism beginning with his novel The Maypole Warriors. Among others, his works include the critical volume Nueva historia de la novela hispanoamericana, the novel AMERIKA, AMERIKKA AMERIKKKA, and ALLENDE: A NOVEL, the fictionalized biography of former Chilean President Salvador Allende, recently published in English translation by Stanford University Press. Professor Alegria’s work has been translated into numerous languages. Chilean novelist, essayist, poet and literary critic, FERNANDO ALEGRIA is currently Emeritus Professor in the Humanities at Stanford University. Originally a realist, he has excelled in magic realism beginning with his novel The Maypole Warriors. Among others, his works include the critical volume Nueva historia de la novela hispanoamericana, the novel AMERIKA, AMERIKKA AMERIKKKA, and ALLENDE: A NOVEL, the fictionalized biography of former Chilean President Salvador Allende, recently published in English translation by Stanford University Press. Professor Alegria’s work has been translated into numerous languages. . CARLOS LOZANO, author of Ruben Dario en España, is one of the most acknowledged translators of Pablo Neruda. His English version of Odas Elementales is a classic. He is also the translator of Caballo de copa by Fernando Alegria. . (original title: Manana los guerreros).

Fernando Alegría (Santiago de Chile, 26 September, 1918 - Walnut Creek, California, October 29, 2005) was a Chilean poet, writer, literary critic and scholar. Alegría grew up in the Independencia barrio of the city. Poets from this barrio include Pablo Neruda, Violeta Parra and Volodia Teitelboim. He received an M.A. from Bowling Green State University in 1941 and a Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley, in 1947. From 1964-1967, Alegría was a professor at the University of California in Berkeley. From 1967 to 1998 he was a professor at Stanford University and for many years he was Chair of the Spanish and Portuguese Language Departments there. He sat on the Board of Trustees at the Western Institute for Social Research (WISR) for about twenty years beginning with its inception in 1975. Alegría served as cultural attaché from the government of Salvador Allende to the United States from 1970 to 1973. He was the representative of the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language in the United States for many years. Among the many awards he received is the Latin American Prize of Literature. A documentary film about the life of Chile’s revolutionary poet Alegría, ¡Viva Chile Mierda!, was produced in 2004. The documentary is a humanistic portrayal of one of the most influential figures from Chile and a key figure in the advancement of Latino culture in the United States of America. Alegría’s ‘Viva Chile Mierda’, the most recited poem of the Allende era, was written in the 1960s.
Alegria, Ricardo E. The Three Wishes: A Collection of Puerto Rican Folktales. New York. 1969. Harcourt Brace & World. Illustrated by Lorenzo Homar. Translated from the Spanish by Elizabeth Culbert. 128 pages. hardcover. Cover illustration by Lorenzo Homar.

The richness and variety of this collection of twenty-three folktales reflect the colorful mingling of cultures-Taino Indian, Spanish, and African-that have been molded over four centuries into the Puerto Rican. Here will be found favorite themes of folktales the world over -foolish youths who turn Out to be braver than people had supposed, weaklings who outwit the strong, devils and witches who always lose to the virtuous, princesses, giants, and clever animals. Yet the familiar themes have been transmuted by their Puerto Rican environ- ment into new versions, which, with their own special charm and humor, are fresh and appealing. Gathered by the Executive Director of the Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña and illustrated with striking brush drawings by the noted Puerto Rican artist Lorenzo Homar, this collection offers hours of pleasure to readers and listeners and a fund of material for teachers and storytellers.

Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Ricardo E. Alegria received his B.A. from the University of Puerto Rico, his M.A. from the University of Chicago, and studied at Harvard for two years under a Guggenheim Fellowship. He has been a professor of history at the University of Puerto Rico since 1947 and has served as Director of the Institute of Puerto Rican Culture since 1955. He has held the positions of Director of the University of Puerto Rico Museum and of the Archeological Research Center at the University. He is the author of six books and of various articles on archeology, history, and folklore in journals published in Puerto Rico, the United States, and Latin America.
Aleman Velasco, Miguel. Copilli: Aztec Prince. Garden City. 1984. Doubleday. 038518901x. Translated from the Spanish. 129 pages. hardcover. Cover: Jorge Encisco/Dover Publications/Editorial Diana,Mexico. JACKET PAINTING COURTESY OF EDITORIAL DIANA, MEXICO.

It is a story that begins in the dusty archives of a library in twentieth-century Florence and ends four centuries in the past, in the heart of pre-Hispanic Mexico. From the obscure hieroglyphics of an ancient maguey scroll spills forth the fusion of reality and myth that is the Aztec empire at its height-a stunning mosaic of obsidian and jade, of Eagle Knights, noblemen, warriors, and priests. A society in which arts and sciences flourish in the grisly shadows of pyramids washed in sacrificial blood, ruled by a pantheon of mysterious and powerful gods whose existence is all too real. Here, too, is the intimate story of one man, Copilli, Aztec prince, of his rigorous training, trials, triumphs, loves, doubts, and dreams. And of the one compelling vision that possesses him - the building of a great Pyramid, to record in the indelible images of stone the rich history and traditions of his people . . . a vision that consumes him in both life and death. Part biography, part historical narrative, wholly novel, this fascinating account of the life of an Aztec nobleman re-creates the hallucinatory splendor of the Aztec civilization - a way of life swept into oblivion by the conquistadors, but echoing still through the corridors of history.

Miguel Alemán Velasco is the author of several previous novels, which have been published to an enthusiastic audience in his native Mexico. The Spanish edition of COPILLI was a bestseller. He is an expert in ancient languages and in the history and mythology of Mexico. This is his first book to appear in the United States.
Alencar, Jose de. Senhora: Profile of a Woman. Austin. 1994. University Of Texas Press. 0292704496. Translated from the Portuguese by Catarina Feldmann Edinger. Texas Pan American Series. 199 pages. hardcover.

‘It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single woman in possession of a good character but no fortune must be in want of a wealthy husband - that is, if she is the heroine of a nineteenth-century novel. Senhora, by contrast, turns the tables on this familiar plot. Its strong- willed, independent heroine Aurélia uses newly inherited wealth to ‘buy back’ and exact revenge on the fiancé who had left her for a woman with a more enticing dowry. This exciting Brazilian novel, originally published in 1875 and here translated into English for the first time, raises intriguing questions about traditional gender relationships, the commercial nature of marriage, and the institution of the dowry. While true love and conventional marital roles triumph in the end, the novel still offers realistic insights into the social and economic structure of Rio de Janeiro in the mid-1800s. With its unexpected plot, it also opens new important perspectives on the nineteenth-century Romantic novel. ‘ . . . an extremely important novel. . . quite startling in its revelations of money and gender as key social mechanisms in nineteenth-century Brazilian life.’ - Daphne Patai, professor of Spanish and Portuguese and of women’s studies, University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Texas Pan American Series . A journalist and politician who served as Minister of Justice under the Emperor Dom Pedro II, JOSE DE ALENCAR (1829-1877) is considered the father of Brazilian literature. He was the author of twenty novels and six plays, as well as many newspaper articles and speeches. . Translator CATARINA FELDMANN EDINGER is an associate professor of English at the William Paterson College of New Jersey. . .

José Martiniano de Alencar (May 1, 1829 — December 12, 1877) was a Brazilian lawyer, politician, orator, novelist and dramatist. He is considered to be one of the most famous and influential Brazilian Romantic novelists of the 19th century, and a major exponent of the literary tradition known as 'Indianism'. Sometimes he signed his works with the pen name Erasmo. He is patron of the 23rd chair of the Brazilian Academy of Letters. José Martiniano de Alencar was born in what is today the bairro of Messejana, Fortaleza, Ceará, on May 1, 1829, to former priest (and later politician) José Martiniano Pereira de Alencar and his cousin Ana Josefina de Alencar. Moving to São Paulo in 1844, he graduated in Law at the Faculdade de Direito da Universidade de São Paulo in 1850 and started his career in law in Rio de Janeiro. Invited by his friend Francisco Otaviano, he became a collaborator for the journal Correio Mercantil. He also wrote many chronicles for the Diário do Rio de Janeiro and the Jornal do Commercio. Alencar would compile all the chronicles he wrote for these newspapers in 1874, under the name Ao Correr da Pena. It was in the Diário do Rio de Janeiro, during the year of 1856, that Alencar gained notoriety, writing the Cartas sobre A Confederação dos Tamoios, under the pseudonym Ig. In them, he bitterly criticized the homonymous poem by Gonçalves de Magalhães. Even the Brazilian Emperor Pedro II, who esteemed Magalhães very much, participated in this polemic, albeit under a pseudonym. Also in 1856, he wrote and published under feuilleton form his first romance, Cinco Minutos, that received critical acclaim. In the following year, his breakthrough novel, O Guarani, was released; it would be adapted into a famous opera by Brazilian composer Antônio Carlos Gomes 13 years later. O Guarani would be first novel of what is informally called 'Alencar's Indianist Trilogy' — a series of three novels by Alencar that focused on the foundations of the Brazilian nation, and on its indigenous peoples and culture. The other two novels, Iracema and Ubirajara, would be published on 1865 and 1874, respectively. Although called a trilogy, the three books are unrelated in its plots. Alencar was affiliated with the Conservative Party of Brazil, being elected as a general deputy for Ceará. He was the Brazilian Minister of Justice from 1868 to 1870. He also planned to be a senator, but Pedro II never appointed him, under the pretext of Alencar being too young; with his feelings hurt, he would abandon politics later. He was very close friends with the also famous writer Machado de Assis, who wrote an article in 1866 praising his novel Iracema, that was published the year before, comparing his Indianist works to Gonçalves Dias, saying that 'Alencar was in prose what Dias was in poetry'. When Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1897, he chose Alencar as the patron of his chair. In 1864 he married Georgina Augusta Cochrane, daughter of an eccentric British aristocrat. They would have six children — Augusto (who would be the Brazilian Minister of External Relations in 1919, and also the Brazilian ambassador on the United States from 1920 to 1924), Clarisse, Ceci, Elisa, Mário (who would be a journalist and writer, and a member of the Brazilian Academy of Letters) and Adélia. (It is implied that Mário de Alencar was actually an illegitimate son of Machado de Assis, a fact that inspired Assis to write his famous novel Dom Casmurro). Alencar died in Rio de Janeiro in 1877, a victim of tuberculosis. A theatre in Fortaleza, the Theatro José de Alencar, was named after him. Translator Catarina Feldmann Edinger is an associate professor of English at the William Paterson College of New Jersey.
Alencar, José Martiniano de. Iracema, or Honey-Lips and Manuel de Moraes the Convert. London. 1886. Bickers and Son. Translated from the Portuguese by Sir Richard and Isabel Burton. 106 pages.

First edition in English of both of these novellas, translated by the Burtons during their stay in Sao Paulo in the late 1860's, but not published until later. These two stories were bound together in light biscuit-coloured paper wrappers, with border in black on front cover, enclosing title for both stories. Iracema is a kind of prose poem of the arrival of Portuguese colonists in Brazil and the unification of races and cultures there.

José Martiniano de Alencar (May 1, 1829 — December 12, 1877) was a Brazilian lawyer, politician, orator, novelist and dramatist. He is considered to be one of the most famous and influential Brazilian Romantic novelists of the 19th century, and a major exponent of the literary tradition known as 'Indianism'. Sometimes he signed his works with the pen name Erasmo. He is patron of the 23rd chair of the Brazilian Academy of Letters. José Martiniano de Alencar was born in what is today the bairro of Messejana, Fortaleza, Ceará, on May 1, 1829, to former priest (and later politician) José Martiniano Pereira de Alencar and his cousin Ana Josefina de Alencar. Moving to São Paulo in 1844, he graduated in Law at the Faculdade de Direito da Universidade de São Paulo in 1850 and started his career in law in Rio de Janeiro. Invited by his friend Francisco Otaviano, he became a collaborator for the journal Correio Mercantil. He also wrote many chronicles for the Diário do Rio de Janeiro and the Jornal do Commercio. Alencar would compile all the chronicles he wrote for these newspapers in 1874, under the name Ao Correr da Pena. It was in the Diário do Rio de Janeiro, during the year of 1856, that Alencar gained notoriety, writing the Cartas sobre A Confederação dos Tamoios, under the pseudonym Ig. In them, he bitterly criticized the homonymous poem by Gonçalves de Magalhães. Even the Brazilian Emperor Pedro II, who esteemed Magalhães very much, participated in this polemic, albeit under a pseudonym. Also in 1856, he wrote and published under feuilleton form his first romance, Cinco Minutos, that received critical acclaim. In the following year, his breakthrough novel, O Guarani, was released; it would be adapted into a famous opera by Brazilian composer Antônio Carlos Gomes 13 years later. O Guarani would be first novel of what is informally called 'Alencar's Indianist Trilogy' — a series of three novels by Alencar that focused on the foundations of the Brazilian nation, and on its indigenous peoples and culture. The other two novels, Iracema and Ubirajara, would be published on 1865 and 1874, respectively. Although called a trilogy, the three books are unrelated in its plots. Alencar was affiliated with the Conservative Party of Brazil, being elected as a general deputy for Ceará. He was the Brazilian Minister of Justice from 1868 to 1870. He also planned to be a senator, but Pedro II never appointed him, under the pretext of Alencar being too young; with his feelings hurt, he would abandon politics later. He was very close friends with the also famous writer Machado de Assis, who wrote an article in 1866 praising his novel Iracema, that was published the year before, comparing his Indianist works to Gonçalves Dias, saying that 'Alencar was in prose what Dias was in poetry'. When Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1897, he chose Alencar as the patron of his chair. In 1864 he married Georgina Augusta Cochrane, daughter of an eccentric British aristocrat. They would have six children — Augusto (who would be the Brazilian Minister of External Relations in 1919, and also the Brazilian ambassador on the United States from 1920 to 1924), Clarisse, Ceci, Elisa, Mário (who would be a journalist and writer, and a member of the Brazilian Academy of Letters) and Adélia. (It is implied that Mário de Alencar was actually an illegitimate son of Machado de Assis, a fact that inspired Assis to write his famous novel Dom Casmurro). Alencar died in Rio de Janeiro in 1877, a victim of tuberculosis. A theatre in Fortaleza, the Theatro José de Alencar, was named after him.
Alencar, José Martiniano de. Iracema; a legend of Ceará. Rio de Janeiro. [no date]. Imprensa Inglesa. Translated from the Portuguese by N. Bidell. 114 pages.

Iracema is one of the three indigenous novels by José de Alencar. It was first published in 1865. The story revolves around the relationship between the Tabajara indigenous woman, Iracema, and the Portuguese colonist, Martim, who was allied with the Tabajara nation's enemies, the Pitiguaras. Through the novel, Alencar tries to remake the history of the Brazilian colonial state of Ceará, with Moacir, the son of Iracema and Martim, as the first true Brazilian in Ceará. This pure Brazilian is born from the love of the natural, innocence (Iracema), culture and knowledge (Martim), and also represents the mixture (miscegenation) of the native race with the European race to produce a new caboclo race.

José Martiniano de Alencar (May 1, 1829 — December 12, 1877) was a Brazilian lawyer, politician, orator, novelist and dramatist. He is considered to be one of the most famous and influential Brazilian Romantic novelists of the 19th century, and a major exponent of the literary tradition known as 'Indianism'. Sometimes he signed his works with the pen name Erasmo. He is patron of the 23rd chair of the Brazilian Academy of Letters. José Martiniano de Alencar was born in what is today the bairro of Messejana, Fortaleza, Ceará, on May 1, 1829, to former priest (and later politician) José Martiniano Pereira de Alencar and his cousin Ana Josefina de Alencar. Moving to São Paulo in 1844, he graduated in Law at the Faculdade de Direito da Universidade de São Paulo in 1850 and started his career in law in Rio de Janeiro. Invited by his friend Francisco Otaviano, he became a collaborator for the journal Correio Mercantil. He also wrote many chronicles for the Diário do Rio de Janeiro and the Jornal do Commercio. Alencar would compile all the chronicles he wrote for these newspapers in 1874, under the name Ao Correr da Pena. It was in the Diário do Rio de Janeiro, during the year of 1856, that Alencar gained notoriety, writing the Cartas sobre A Confederação dos Tamoios, under the pseudonym Ig. In them, he bitterly criticized the homonymous poem by Gonçalves de Magalhães. Even the Brazilian Emperor Pedro II, who esteemed Magalhães very much, participated in this polemic, albeit under a pseudonym. Also in 1856, he wrote and published under feuilleton form his first romance, Cinco Minutos, that received critical acclaim. In the following year, his breakthrough novel, O Guarani, was released; it would be adapted into a famous opera by Brazilian composer Antônio Carlos Gomes 13 years later. O Guarani would be first novel of what is informally called 'Alencar's Indianist Trilogy' — a series of three novels by Alencar that focused on the foundations of the Brazilian nation, and on its indigenous peoples and culture. The other two novels, Iracema and Ubirajara, would be published on 1865 and 1874, respectively. Although called a trilogy, the three books are unrelated in its plots. Alencar was affiliated with the Conservative Party of Brazil, being elected as a general deputy for Ceará. He was the Brazilian Minister of Justice from 1868 to 1870. He also planned to be a senator, but Pedro II never appointed him, under the pretext of Alencar being too young; with his feelings hurt, he would abandon politics later. He was very close friends with the also famous writer Machado de Assis, who wrote an article in 1866 praising his novel Iracema, that was published the year before, comparing his Indianist works to Gonçalves Dias, saying that 'Alencar was in prose what Dias was in poetry'. When Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1897, he chose Alencar as the patron of his chair. In 1864 he married Georgina Augusta Cochrane, daughter of an eccentric British aristocrat. They would have six children — Augusto (who would be the Brazilian Minister of External Relations in 1919, and also the Brazilian ambassador on the United States from 1920 to 1924), Clarisse, Ceci, Elisa, Mário (who would be a journalist and writer, and a member of the Brazilian Academy of Letters) and Adélia. (It is implied that Mário de Alencar was actually an illegitimate son of Machado de Assis, a fact that inspired Assis to write his famous novel Dom Casmurro). Alencar died in Rio de Janeiro in 1877, a victim of tuberculosis. A theatre in Fortaleza, the Theatro José de Alencar, was named after him.
Alfieri, Annamaria. City of Silver. New York. 2009. St Martin's Minotaur. 9780312383862. 336 pages. hardcover.

In Potosí, the richest city in the Western Hemisphere, Inez de la Morada, the bewitching, cherished daughter of the rich and powerful Mayor, mysteriously dies at the convent of Santa Isabella de los Santos Milagros, where she had fled in defiance of her father. It looks as though the girl committed suicide, but Mother Abbess Maria Santa Hilda believes her innocent and has her buried at the convent in sacred ground. Fray Ubaldo DaTriesta, local Commissioner of the Inquisition, has been keeping an eye on the Abbess, who is too ‘Protestant’ for his tastes, and this action may be just what he needs to convince the lazy, cowardly Bishop to punish her. At the same time, Potosí finds its prosperity threatened. The King of Spain has discovered that the coins the city has been circulating throughout the world are not pure silver and is sending his top prosecutor and the Grand Inquisitor to mete out punishment. With the imminent arrival of the Spanish officials, many have reason to prove their loyalty, and keep hidden the crimes and sins they’ve committed. With her life at stake, Maria Santa Hilda finds herself in a race against time to prove the true cause of Inez’s death, aided by her fellow sisters, a Jesuit priest with a dark secret from his past, and a tomboyish girl who’s run to the convent to avoid an unwanted marriage. Together they will discover that Inez was not the girl she seemed, and that greed has no limits. Annamaria Alfieri writes with astounding detail, showing an appreciation for the complexities and social nuances of this intriguing time in Latin American history when politicians, religious leaders, and an indigenous people all competed for power and survival in the thin mountain air of the Andes. A lover of South American history, Annamaria Alfieri lives in New York City. This is her first novel.

Annamaria Alfieri is president of the Mystery Writers of America–New York chapter. She lives in New York City.
Algarin, Miguel and Pinero, Miguel (editors). Nuyorican Poetry: An Anthology of Puerto Rican Words and Feelings. New York. 1975. Morrow. 0688029671. Photos by Gil Mendez. 185 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Karen Thompson. Jacket photograph by Gil Mendez.

The publication of NUYORICAN POETRY marks an important literary and cultural event. Here for the first time is heard the voice of the transplanted Puerto Ricans, a people uprooted from their culture and resettled in a country full of contradictions: frightening and inhospitable in its strangeness, while at the same time offering hope and new opportunities to these most recent immigrants. Nuyorican was forged out of the collision between Spanish and American cultures-and to the writers represented in this exciting collection of poetry and poetic prose, Nuyorican has a twofold meaning. In specific terms, Nuyorican is a new American language, one uniquely suited to express the rawness, beauty, and passion of the new Puerto Ricans; and more generally, Nuyorican describes a people and their experience. Young, old, vibrant, hip, streetwise, touching-the writers here range from a nine-year-old schoolboy to prizewinning playwright Miguel Piñero. The scope of the anthology is equally broad and is divided into three sections. In the first, we hear the voice of the Outlaw Poet: his effort is to communicate the immediate need for open aggression against his condition. In the second part the Evolutionary Poet speaks: he teaches how ‘to live’ in an environment that is constantly stifling his will to live. And finally in section three the ‘Dusmic’ Poet tells of his struggle to convert the aggressions and hate of others into passions that can be used to construct a new self and a new world. Professor Miguel Algarin of Rutgers University and prizewinning playwright Miguel Piñero have compiled this volume whose emotional integrity and veracity of detail will appeal to readers of all backgrounds. Professor Algarin’s introductions and Gil Mendez’s photographic essay illuminate the text of this ground-breaking, revolutionary, and stunning collection. CONTENTS: Introduction: Nuyorican Language; Part I OUTLAW POETRY - PEDRO PIETRI - Underground Poetry; A Prayer Backwards; before and after graduation day; Song Without Words; SANDRA MARIA ESTEVES - Ode to a Tequila Head; JOSÉ-ANGEL FIGUEROA - Felipa-La Filósofa Del Rincón; JORGE LOPEZ - About los Ratones; Pesetas de Embuste; ARCHIE MARTINEZ - Viet-Nam; MARTITA MORALES - The Sounds of Sixth Street; MIGUEL ALGARIN - A Mongo Affair; Inside Control: my tongue; LUCKY CIENFUEGOS - Lolita Lebrón, Recuerdos Te Mandamos; MIGUEL PINERO - The Book of Genesis According to Saint Miguelito; La Metadona Está Cabrona; No Hay Nada Nuevo en Nueva York; Runnin’ Scared; A Poem For Joey’s Mami’s Struggle; Seekin’ the Cause; T C. GARCIA - Message of My People; ANGEL BERROCALES - Situation Heavy; The Teacher of Life; AMERICO CASIANO - A day when clinkers, sparrows and canaries jitterbugged down the street with a latin accent; SHORTY BON BON - A junkie’s Heaven; DADI PINERO - Puerto Rico’s Reply; Life Now; Part II EVOLUTIONARY POETRY - BIMBO - A Job; MIGUEL ALGARIN - Biological; Posed Release; Tangiers; MARTITA MORALES - Teatro; CARLOS CONDE - Asi Era Yo; AMINA MUNOZ - puerto rican graffiti; 149th St. winter; ‘welcome to san juan, oldest city in the u.s.’; a chant; JESUS PAPOLETO MELENDEZ - sister, para nuestras hermanas; T. C. GARCIA - Puerto Rican Epitaph; Under an Apple Tree; AMERICO CASIANO - When was the last time you saw mami smile?; MIGUEL PINERO - Twice a Month Is Mother’s Day; PEDRO PIETRI - Love Story; Part III DUSMIC POETRY - SANDRA MARIA ESTEVES - for tito; Blanket Weaver; i look for peace great Graveyard; MIGUEL ALGARIN - Sunday, August 11, 1974; San Juan/an arrest/Maguayo/a vision of Malo dancing; LUZ RODRIGUEZ - i feel the eve; Holding You; PEDRO PIETRI - do not let; Voodoo; LUCKY CIENFUEGOS - The Influence of Don Quixote; High heel, silver shoes; Dedicada a Maria Rodriguez Martinez February 24,l975; The Nerve of Time; My In of Me; CARLOS CONDE - Nocturnos en una Noche Perdida; T. C. GARCIA - Prison Love; ISIDRO GARCIA - Water Figure; JESUS PAPOLETO MELÉNDEZ - Bruja; MIGUEL PINERO - Una Lágrima en un Cristal; The Records of Time; Afterword; Biographies.

Miguel Algarin, four-time American Book Award winner and Obie-winning founder of the Nuyorican Poets Cafe, is a highly acclaimed poet and an associate professor of writing at Rutgers University. Miguel Piñero (December 19, 1946 – June 16, 1988) was a playwright, actor and co-founder of the Nuyorican Poets Café. He was a leading member of the Nuyorican literary movement.
Algarin, Miguel. Love Is Hard Work. New York. 1997. Scribner. 0684839997. Poetry From The Founder Of The Nuyorican Poets' Cafe. 155 pages. hardcover. Jacket Design By Timothy Hsu. Jacket Photograph By Arlene Gottfried. Author Photograph By Marlis Momber

At once a moving personal memoir and a colorful portrait of life in New York’s Lower East Side (Loisaida), this masterly collection of poems captures the whirlwind of sights, sounds, celebrations and sorrows of urban life. As father of the contemporary Latino literary movement and founder of the Nuyorican Poets Cafe, Miguel Algarin has brought the diverse voices and talents of the downtown New York scene to audiences throughout the world. In these poetic renderings of the lives and deaths of numerous friends, Algarin the poet celebrates both the well known and the obscure - and brings to life private loves, nurtured in both pain and joy, and public collaborations, born in the turbulent excitement of Algarin’s cafe. In the centerpiece of the book, the poet offers a searing, unsentimental look at himself and his life. A celebration of the beautiful, the grotesque, the comic and the tragic, these poems resound with honesty, passion and grace - a testament to the extraordinary talent and keen eye of Miguel Algarin.

Miguel Algarin is associate professor of English at Rutgers University and founder of the Nuyorican Poets Cafe. He has received many awards and honors for both his poetry and his work in the theater, including the Bessie Award for Outstanding Creative Achievement, an OBIE, three consecutive Audelco Awards for Dramatic Production of the Year and four American Book Awards. He is the coeditor of ALOUD: THE NUYORICAN POETS CAFE ANTHOLOGY and ACTION: THE NUYORICAN POETS CAFE THEATER FESTIVAL, published by Touchstone in September 1997. His previous works include Time’s Now, Body Bee Callin from the Twenty-First Century and Song of Protest, a translation of Pablo Neruda.
Allen, John Houghton (compiler and translator). A Latin-American Miscellany. Randado, Texas. 1943. Privately printed. 77 pages.

Appropriately called a 'miscellany,' for it includes selections from the colonial era, romanticism, modernism, and the post-modernist period. Prose selections by: Ruben Dario (Nicaragua), José Eustasio Rivera (Colombia), Rufino Blanco Fombona (Venezuela), Ricardo Palma (Peru), José Enrique Rodó (Uruguay), Domingo Faustino Sarmiento (Argentina). Poetry selections by: Fabio Fiallo (Dominican Republic), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz (Mexico), Amado Nervo (Mexico), Enrique Gonzalez Martinez (Mexico), Ruben Dario (Nicaragua), Aquileo J. Echeverria (Costa Rica), José Asunción Silva (Colombia), Emilio Gallegos del Campo (Ecuador), José Santos Chocano (Peru), Julio Herrera y Reissig (Uruguay), Enrique Banchs (Argentina), José Hernández (Argentina). Also included are poems by Gutierre de Cetina (Spain) and José-Maria de Hérédia (Cuba, from French), and an excerpt of a chronicle by Spanish conquistador Bernardino Vásquez de Tapia.

Allende, Isabel. Daughter of Fortune. New York. 1999. Harper Collins. 006019491x. 399 pages. paperback.

From the acclaimed international bestselling author of THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS and PAULA comes this dazzling new historical novel, her most ambitious work of fiction yet - a sweeping portrait of an unconventional woman carving her own destiny in an era marked by violence, passion, and adventure. An orphan raised in Valparaiso, Chile, by a Victorian spinster and her rigid brother, young, vivacious Eliza Sommers follows her lover to California during the Gold Rush of 1849 - a danger-filled quest that will become a momentous journey of transformation from innocence to independence. A masterful novel of love, adversity, spirit, and fulfillment, DAUGHTER OF FORTUNE once again demonstrates Isabel Allende’s extraordinary literary gifts and confirms her place as one of the world’s leading writers.

Isabel Allende (born 2 August 1942) is a Chilean writer. Allende, whose works sometimes contain aspects of the ‘magic realist‘ tradition, is famous for novels such as The House of the Spirits (La casa de los espíritus, 1982) and City of the Beasts (La ciudad de las bestias, 2002), which have been commercially successful.
Allende, Isabel. Eva Luna. New York. 1988. Knopf. 0394572734. Translated from the Spanish by Margaret Sayers Peden. 272 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration and design by James McMullan

In a very short time, Isabel Allende has won the allegiance and affection of readers and reviewers around the world-first with The House of the Spirits (praised by Alexander Coleman in The New York Tines Book Review as ‘a unique achievement, both personal witness and possible allegory of the past, present and future of Latin America’), followed closely by OF LOVE AND SHADOWS (of which Jonathan Yardley said in The Washington Post Book REVIEW, ‘The people . . . are so real, their triumphs and defeats are so faithful to the truth of human existence, that we see the world in miniature. This is precisely what fiction should do’). Now, in EVA LUNA, she has written her most ambitious and original work, a book that makes the foreign both familiar and welcoming, a book that confirms beyond any doubt her status as a major literary presence. ‘My name is Eva, which means ‘life,’ according to a book of names my mother consulted. I was born in the back room of a shadowy house, and grew up amidst ancient furniture, books in Latin, and human mummies, but none of these things made me melancholy, because I came into the world with a breath of the jungle in my memory.’ This is the voice that carries us through Eva Luna, the assured voice of a naturally inventive storyteller, a woman who relates to us the picaresque tale of her own life (born poor, orphaned early, she will eventually rise to a position of unique influence) and of the people-from all levels of society-that she meets along the way. They include the rich and eccentric, for whom she works as a servant . . . the Lebanese emigré who befriends her and takes her in . . . her unfortunate godmother, whose brain is addled by rum, and who believes in all the Catholic saints, some of African origin and a few of her own invention . . . a street urchin who grows into a petty criminal and, later a leader in the guerrilla struggle . . . a celebrated transsexual entertainer who instructs her, with great tenderness and insight, in the ways of the adult world . . . a young refugee whose flight from postwar Europe will prove crucial to Eva’s fate . . . As Eva tells her story, Isabel Allende conjures up a whole complex South American nation-the rich, the poor, the simple, and the sophisticated- in a novel replete with character and incident, with drama and comedy and history, a novel that will delight and increase her devoted audience. . Born in Peru, Isabel Allende is Chilean. She was a journalist for many years and began to write fiction in 1981. The result was the worldwide bestseller THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS, which was followed two years later by the equally successful OF LOVE AND SHADOWS. Long a resident of Caracas, she now makes her home in San Rafael, California, where she is completing a new book.

Isabel Allende (born 2 August 1942) is a Chilean writer. Allende, whose works sometimes contain aspects of the ‘magic realist‘ tradition, is famous for novels such as The House of the Spirits (La casa de los espíritus, 1982) and City of the Beasts (La ciudad de las bestias, 2002), which have been commercially successful. Allende has been called ‘the world's most widely read Spanish-language author’. In 2004, Allende was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and in 2010, she received Chile's National Literature Prize. Allende's novels are often based upon her personal experience and pay homage to the lives of women, while weaving together elements of myth and realism. She has lectured and toured many American colleges to teach literature. Fluent in English as a second language, Allende was granted American citizenship in 2003, having lived in California with her American husband since 1989.
Allende, Isabel. Of Love and Shadows. New York. 1987. Knopf. 0394549627. Translated from the Spanish by Margaret Sayers Peden. 274 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration by Anthony Russo. Jacket design by Sara Eisenman.

Rarely has a first novel catapulted a writer so suddenly to international attention and acclaim as Isabel Allende’s THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS, the epic story of the large and tempestuous Trueba family. Now, with OF LOVE AND SHADOWS-itself a bestseller and critical success in Europe and Latin America-the promise of that auspicious debut is fulfilled. As in her first novel, Isabel Allende transports us to a world of large events, high drama, and rich emotions. Again we are in an unnamed Latin American country, this time in the grip of a military dictatorship. And at the center are two people, a woman and a man, who are fated, under the most desperate circumstances, to fall totally in love. She is Irene Beltrán, a daughter of the upper classes, a well-intentioned if somewhat naïve reporter for a women’s magazine. He is Francisco Leal, son of Spanish exiles, a photographer and a clandestine worker in the resistance. Sent on a routine assignment, these two uncover a hideous crime, the revelation of which will challenge-and provoke-the official terrorism of the regime and will put their very lives at risk. OF LOVE AND SHADOWS gives us these people, their families, their country, and their agonized times with all the style and imagination, feeling and power that Isabel Allende’s many passionate readers expect and recognize. And it should confirm her reputation as a major and original literary voice.

Isabel Allende (born 2 August 1942) is a Chilean writer. Allende, whose works sometimes contain aspects of the ‘magic realist‘ tradition, is famous for novels such as The House of the Spirits (La casa de los espíritus, 1982) and City of the Beasts (La ciudad de las bestias, 2002), which have been commercially successful. Allende has been called ‘the world's most widely read Spanish-language author’. In 2004, Allende was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and in 2010, she received Chile's National Literature Prize. Allende's novels are often based upon her personal experience and pay homage to the lives of women, while weaving together elements of myth and realism. She has lectured and toured many American colleges to teach literature. Fluent in English as a second language, Allende was granted American citizenship in 2003, having lived in California with her American husband since 1989.
Allende, Isabel. Paula. New York. 1995. Harper Collins. 0060172533. Translated from the Dpanish by Margaret Sayers Peden. 330 pages. hardcover. Jacket design and illustration (c) 1995 by Honi Werner. Illustration based on detail from Diego Velazquez's The Virgin Presenting the Chasuble to Saint Ildephonsus. Author photograph (c) 1994 by Jerry Bauer.

Paula is a soul-baring memoir, which, like a novel of suspense, one reads without drawing a breath. The point of departure for these moving pages is a tragic personal experience. In December 1991, Isabel Allende’s daughter, Paula, became gravely ill and shortly thereafter fell into a coma. During months in the hospital, the author began to write the story of her family for her unconscious daughter. In the telling, bizarre ancestors appear before our eyes; we hear both delightful and bitter childhood memories, amazing anecdotes of youthful years, the most intimate secrets passed along in whispers. Chile, Allende’s native land, comes alive as well, with the turbulent history of the military coup of 1973, the ensuing dictatorship, and her family’s years of exile. As an exorcism of death, in these pages Isabel Allende explores the past and questions the gods. The result is a magical book that carries the reader from tears to laughter, from terror to sensuality and wisdom. The glorious characters of Allende’s fiction-clairvoyants, revolutionaries, and most of all the questing woman who makes her way through storytelling-populate this autobiography, perhaps Allende’s finest work, and certainly her most revealing. In PAULA we understand that the miraculous world of THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS and EVA LUNA is the world Isabel Allende inhabits-it is her enchanted reality.

Isabel Allende (born 2 August 1942) is a Chilean writer. Allende, whose works sometimes contain aspects of the ‘magic realist‘ tradition, is famous for novels such as The House of the Spirits (La casa de los espíritus, 1982) and City of the Beasts (La ciudad de las bestias, 2002), which have been commercially successful.
Allende, Isabel. Portrait in Sepia. New York. 2001. Harper Collins. 0066211611. 304 pages. hardcover. Jacket photograph by Marcia Lieberman

Isabel Allende’s sensuous novel about the mystery of memory In nineteenth-century Chile, Aurora del Valle suffers a brutal trauma that erases all recollections of the first five years of her life. Raised by her regal and ambitious grandmother Paulina del Valle, Aurora grows up in a privileged environment, but is tormented by horrible nightmares. When she is forced to recognize her betrayal at the hands of the man she loves, and to cope with the resulting solitude, she explores the mystery of her past.

Isabel Allende (born 2 August 1942) is a Chilean writer. Allende, whose works sometimes contain aspects of the ‘magic realist‘ tradition, is famous for novels such as The House of the Spirits (La casa de los espíritus, 1982) and City of the Beasts (La ciudad de las bestias, 2002), which have been commercially successful.
Allende, Isabel. The House of the Spirits. New York. 1985. Knopf. 0394539079. Translated from the Spanish by Magda Bogin. 368 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration by Michel Guire Vaka. Jacket design by Sara Eicenman

Already a best seller and critical success in Europe and Latin America, THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS is the magnificent epic of the Trueba family-their loves, their ambitions, their spiritual quests, their relations with one another, and their participation in the history of their times, a history that becomes destiny and overtakes them all. We begin-at the turn of the century, in an unnamed South American country-in the childhood home of the woman who will be the mother and grandmother of the clan, Clara del Valle. A warm-hearted, hypersensitive girl, Clara has distinguished herself from an early age with her telepathic abilities-she can read fortunes, make objects move as if they had lives of their own, and predict the future. Following the mysterious death of her sister, the fabled Rosa the Beautiful, Clara has been mute for nine years, resisting all attempts to make her speak. When she breaks her silence, it is to announce that she will be married soon. Her husband-to-be is Esteban Trueba, a stern, willful man, given to fits of rage and haunted by a profound loneliness. At the age of thirty-five, he has returned to the capital from his country estate to visit his dying mother and to find a wife. (He was Rosa’s fiancé, and her death has marked him as deeply as it has Clara.) This is the man Clara has foreseen-has summoned to be her husband; Esteban, in turn, will conceive a passion for Clara that will last the rest of his long and rancorous life. We go with this couple as they move into the extravagant house he builds for her, a structure that everyone calls ‘the big house on the corner’ which is soon populated with Clara’s spiritualist friends, the artists she sponsors, the charity cases she takes an interest in, with Esteban’s political cronies, and, above all, with the Trueba children . . . their daughter, Blanca, a practical, self-effacing girl who will, to the fury of her father, form a lifelong liaison with the son of his foreman . . . the twins, Jaime and Nicolás, the former a solitary, taciturn boy who becomes a doctor to the poor and unfortunate; the latter a playboy, a dabbler in Eastern religions and mystical disciplines . . . and, in the third generation, the child Alba, Blanca’s daughter (the family does not recognize the real father for years, so great is Esteban’s anger), a child who is fondled and indulged and instructed by them all. For all their good fortune, their natural (and supernatural) talents, and their powerful attachments to one another, the inhabitants of ‘the big house on the corner’ are not immune to the larger forces of the world. And, as the twentieth century beats on . . . as Esteban becomes more strident in his opposition to Communism . . . as Jaime becomes the friend and confidant of the Socialist leader known as the Candidate . . . as Alba falls in love with a student radical . . . the Truebas become actors-and victims-in a tragic series of events that gives THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS a deeper resonance and meaning. It is the supreme achievement of this splendid novel that we feel ourselves members of this large, passionate (and sometimes exasperating) family, that we become attached to them as if they were our own. That this is the author’s first novel makes it all the more extraordinary. THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS marks the appearance of a major international writer.

Isabel Allende (born 2 August 1942) is a Chilean writer. Allende, whose works sometimes contain aspects of the ‘magic realist‘ tradition, is famous for novels such as The House of the Spirits (La casa de los espíritus, 1982) and City of the Beasts (La ciudad de las bestias, 2002), which have been commercially successful. Allende has been called ‘the world's most widely read Spanish-language author’. In 2004, Allende was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and in 2010, she received Chile's National Literature Prize. Allende's novels are often based upon her personal experience and pay homage to the lives of women, while weaving together elements of myth and realism. She has lectured and toured many American colleges to teach literature. Fluent in English as a second language, Allende was granted American citizenship in 2003, having lived in California with her American husband since 1989.
Allende, Isabel. The Infinite Plan. New York. 1993. Harper Collins. 0060170166. Translated from the Spanish by Margaret Sayers Peden. 382 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration & Design By Honi Werner

THE INFINITE PLAN charts one man’s spiritual progress against five decades of history and cultural change. Greg Reeves, the son of an itinerant preacher who claims that life is governed by an infinite plan, spends the latter part of his childhood in the L.A. barrio where his family settled when their father became ill. His best friend and soul mate there is Carmen Morales, the daughter of a hospitable Latino family. The novel follows Greg and Carmen through turbulent experiences as each searches for identity. Greg discovers several different kinds of racial discrimination in the crowded barrio. Later, he taps into the social and sexual revolution in Berkeley; and suffers through the crucible of Vietnam, from which he emerges determined to become rich and powerful no matter the cost in morality or peace of mind. He enters into disastrous marriages with two beautiful women, both of whom, he belatedly realizes, resemble his passive, remote mother; he also fails as a father. Allende’s intensely imagined prose has clarity and dimension; she describes the exotic and the mundane with equal skill. Along the way Greg discovers that ‘there is no infinite plan, just the strife of living.’

Isabel Allende (born 2 August 1942) is a Chilean writer. Allende, whose works sometimes contain aspects of the ‘magic realist‘ tradition, is famous for novels such as The House of the Spirits (La casa de los espíritus, 1982) and City of the Beasts (La ciudad de las bestias, 2002), which have been commercially successful.
Allende, Isabel. The Stories of Eva Luna. New York. 1991. Atheneum. 0689121024. Translated from the Spanish by Margaret Sayers Peden. 335 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration by Alicia Czecbowski. jacket design by Andy Bass. Handlettering by Carole Lowenstein.

In 1988 Isabel Allende published EVA LUNA, a novel that recounted the adventurous life of a poor young Latin American woman who finds friendship, love and some measure of worldly success through her powers as a storyteller. Now in THE STORIES OF EVA LUNA, she again presents us with a treasure trove of such stories, showing us once more why Eva Luna (and her much-celebrated creator) has won such a large and devoted readership.

Isabel Allende (born 2 August 1942) is a Chilean writer. Allende, whose works sometimes contain aspects of the ‘magic realist‘ tradition, is famous for novels such as The House of the Spirits (La casa de los espíritus, 1982) and City of the Beasts (La ciudad de las bestias, 2002), which have been commercially successful.
Allende, Isabel. The Stories of Eva Luna. New York. 1999. Scribner Classics. 0684873591. Translated from the Spanish by Margaret Sayers Peden. 335 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration by Honi Werner

In 1988 Isabel Allende published EVA LUNA, a novel that recounted the adventurous life of a poor young Latin American woman who finds friendship, love and some measure of worldly success through her powers as a storyteller. Her most ambitious novel to date, EVA LUNA was described by the Washington Post as a ‘cascade of stories [that] tumbles out before the reader, stories vivid, passionate and human.’ Now in THE STORIES OF EVA LUNA, she again presents us with a treasure trove of such stories, showing us once more why Eva Luna (and her much-celebrated creator) has won such a large and devoted readership. We begin with Rolf Carlé, the European refugee, journalist and lover who figured so largely in her last book. Lying in bed with Eva Luna, he asks her to tell him a story. ‘What about?’ she asks. ‘Tell me a story you have never told anyone before. Make it up for me.’ And so she does, giving Rolf Carlé and the reader twenty-three vibrant, enchanting demonstrations of her artistry. Here are campesinos and rich people, guerrillas and fortune-tellers, great beauties and tyrants, the foreign rendered indelibly familiar. Here is Clarisa, ‘born before the city had electricity, she lived to see television coverage of the first astronaut levitating on the moon, and she died of amazement when the Pope came for a visit and was met in the street by homosexuals dressed up as nuns’. . . here is El Capitán, who waited for forty years before proposing to his dancing partner . . . Horacio Fortunato, a circus owner and entrepreneur, whose encounter with a languid foreign woman will force him to change his roguish ways even as he attempts to court her . . . Maurizia Rugieri, who abandons her husband and child for a young medical student, converting their life together into an opera of her own design . . . Nicholas Vidal, who ‘had always known that a woman would cost him his life’ but never suspected that it would be the wife of Judge Hidalgo . . . Riad Halabi (whom readers will remember from Eva Luna), once again displaying his concern and wisdom for the people of Agua Santa . . . Marcia Lieberman, the wife of a European diplomat, whose brief affair with the President for Life of an unnamed Latin American country has startling rewards . . . Love, vengeance, nostalgia, compassion, irony - Isabel Allende leaves no emotion untouched in these stories. Opulently imagined, stirringly told, they confirm once more her place as one of the world’s leading writers. . Born in Peru, Isabel Allende is Chilean. She worked as a journalist for many years and only began to write fiction in 1981. The result was the widely acclaimed international bestseller THE HOUSE OF THE SPIRITS, which was soon followed by the novels OF LOVE AND SHADOWS and EVA LUNA. She left her homeland after the coup of 1973 and lived for many years in Caracas. She now lives near San Francisco, where she is completing her fourth novel. . Originally published in Spanish as Cuentos de Eva Luna - Plaza y Janes, S.A., Barcelona, Spain.

Isabel Allende (born 2 August 1942) is a Chilean writer. Allende, whose works sometimes contain aspects of the ‘magic realist‘ tradition, is famous for novels such as The House of the Spirits (La casa de los espíritus, 1982) and City of the Beasts (La ciudad de las bestias, 2002), which have been commercially successful. Allende has been called ‘the world's most widely read Spanish-language author’. In 2004, Allende was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and in 2010, she received Chile's National Literature Prize. Allende's novels are often based upon her personal experience and pay homage to the lives of women, while weaving together elements of myth and realism. She has lectured and toured many American colleges to teach literature. Fluent in English as a second language, Allende was granted American citizenship in 2003, having lived in California with her American husband since 1989.
Allende, Isabel. Zorro. New York. 2005. Harper Collins. 0060778970. 390 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Roberto de Vicq Cumptich

A swashbuckling adventure story that reveals for the first time how Diego de la Vega became the masked man we all know so well. Born in southern California late in the eighteenth century, he is a child of two worlds. Diego de la Vega’s father is an aristocratic Spanish military man turned landowner; his mother, a Shoshone warrior. Diego learns from his maternal grandmother, White Owl, the ways of her tribe while receiving from his father lessons in the art of fencing and in cattle branding. It is here, during Diego’s childhood, filled with mischief and adventure, that he witnesses the brutal injustices dealt Native Americans by European settlers and first feels the inner conflict of his heritage. At the age of sixteen, Diego is sent to Barcelona for a European education. In a country chafing under the corruption of Napoleonic rule, Diego follows the example of his celebrated fencing master and joins La Justicia, a secret underground resistance movement devoted to helping the powerless and the poor. With this tumultuous period as a backdrop, Diego falls in love, saves the persecuted, and confronts for the first time a great rival who emerges from the world of privilege. Between California and Barcelona, the New World and the Old, the persona of Zorro is formed, a great hero is born, and the legend begins. After many adventures-duels at dawn, fierce battles with pirates at sea, and impossible rescues-Diego de la Vega, a.k.a. Zorro, returns to America to reclaim the hacienda on which he was raised and to seek justice for all who cannot fight for it themselves.

Isabel Allende (born 2 August 1942) is a Chilean writer. Allende, whose works sometimes contain aspects of the ‘magic realist‘ tradition, is famous for novels such as The House of the Spirits (La casa de los espíritus, 1982) and City of the Beasts (La ciudad de las bestias, 2002), which have been commercially successful. Allende has been called ‘the world's most widely read Spanish-language author’. In 2004, Allende was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and in 2010, she received Chile's National Literature Prize. Allende's novels are often based upon her personal experience and pay homage to the lives of women, while weaving together elements of myth and realism. She has lectured and toured many American colleges to teach literature. Fluent in English as a second language, Allende was granted American citizenship in 2003, having lived in California with her American husband since 1989.
Allende, Salvador. Chile's Road To Socialism. Baltimore. 1973. Penguin Books. 0140217185. Edited by Joan E. Garces. Introduction by Richard Gott. Translated from the Spanish by J. Darling. 208 pages. paperback. The cover shows a National Union Manifesto.

This series attacks current ignorance of an area where hundreds thrive and thousands starve and where politics lean three ways: towards the United States, towards national independence, and towards Marxist-Leninist revolution. Economic, political and even personal studies (of the whole region or of individual countries) attempt to fill in the background against which such men as Che Guevara have fought and are still fighting. After fighting for socialism in Chile since 1932, Salvador Allende became President in 1970 at the head of a broadly based coalition of Socialists, Communists, Radicals and left-wing Christians. His election, writes Richard Gott in his introduction, was ‘the most positive event in the continent since the victory of the Cuban guerillas a decade earlier.’ CHILE’S ROAD TO SOCIALISM is a selection of plans and ideas from Allende’s program, taken from his speeches and statements during the first six months of his presidency and including his inaugural address and his first annual messages to Congress.

Salvador Guillermo Allende Gossens (26 June 1908 – 11 September 1973) was a Chilean physician and politician, known as the first Marxist to become president of a Latin American country through open elections. Allende's involvement in Chilean political life spanned a period of nearly forty years. As a member of the Socialist Party, he was a senator, deputy and cabinet minister. He unsuccessfully ran for the presidency in the 1952, 1958, and 1964 elections. In 1970, he won the presidency in a close three-way race. He was elected in a run-off by Congress as no candidate had gained a majority. As president, Allende adopted a policy of nationalization of industries and collectivisation; due to these and other factors, increasingly strained relations between him and the legislative and judicial branches of the Chilean government culminated in a declaration by Congress of a "constitutional breakdown". On 11 September 1973, the military moved to oust Allende in a coup d'état supported by the United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). As troops surrounded La Moneda Palace, he gave his last speech vowing not to resign. Later that day, Allende committed suicide with an assault rifle, according to an investigation conducted by a Chilean court with the assistance of international experts in 2011. Following Allende's death, General Augusto Pinochet refused to return authority to a civilian government, and Chile was later ruled by a military junta that was in power up until 1990, ending almost four decades of uninterrupted democratic rule. The military junta that took over dissolved the Congress of Chile, suspended the Constitution, and began a persecution of alleged dissidents, in which thousands of Allende's supporters were kidnapped, tortured, and murdered.
Almeida, Germano. The Last Will and Testament of Senhor da Silva Araujo. New York. 2004. New Directions. 0811215652. Translated from the Portuguese by Shelia Faria Glaser. Paperback Original. 152 pages. paperback. Cover photograph by Pierre Ren?- Worms. design by Semadar Megged.

Everyone in Cape Verde knew Senhor da Silva Araujo. Successful entrepeneur, owner of the island’s first automobile, a most serious, upright, and self-made businessman, Senhor da Silva Araujo was the local success story. Born an orphan, he never married, he never splurged-one good suit was good enough for him-and he never wandered from the straight and narrow. Or so everyone thought. But when his 387-page Last Will and Testament is read aloud-a marathon task on a hot afternoon which exhausts reader after reader-there is shocking news, and not just for the smug nephew so certain of inheriting all of Senhor da Silva Araujo’s property. In his will, Senhor da Silva Araujo has left a memoir that is a touching web of elaborate self-deceptions. He desired so ardently to prosper, to be taken seriously, and to join (perhaps, if they would have him) the exclusive Grémio country club. But most of all, he wanted to be a good man. And yet, shady deals, twists of fate, an illegitimate child: such is the lot of poor, self-critical Senhor da Silva Araujo. A bit like Calvino’s Mr. Palomar in his attention to protocol and in his terror of life’s passions; a bit like Svevo’s Zeno (a little pompous, a little old-fashioned, and often hapless), Senhor da Silva Araujo moves along a deliciously blurry line between farce and tragedy: a self-important buffoon becomes a fully human, even tragic, figure in the arc of this wonderful novel-translated into Spanish, German, French, Italian, Dutch, Norwegian, and Swedish, and now, at last, English.

Germano Almeida (born 1945 in Boa Vista) is a Cape Verdean author and lawyer. Born on the Cape island Boa Vista, Almeida studied law at the University of Lisbon and currently practices in Mindelo. His novels have been translated into several languages. He married Sam Stewart in 1970. Almeida founded the magazine Porto & Vírgula (1983-87) and Aguaviva. In 1989 he founded the Ilhéu Editora publishing house and has since published 16 books (nine novels). His first work was O dia das calças roladas which was about an account of a strike on the island of Santo Antão, it was first written in 1982 and was published in 1983. He wrote the novel The Last Will and Testament of Senhor da Silva Araújo which was about businessman turned philanthropist who leaves his fortune to his illegitimate daughter. As independence comes he is shown up to be a relic of colonialism. A motion picture would be made about the novel in 1997 and was directed by the Portuguese director Francisco Manso, it won the award at the Brazil's largest film festival, the Festival de Cinema de Gramado. He later published Dona Pura e os Camaradas de Abril in 1999, a story about the 1974 Carnation revolution in Portugal. Cabo Verde – Viagem pela história das ilhas, published in 2003 was his historical presentation of all the nine inhabited islands that constitute Cape Verde. His recently published novels and works were Eva in 2006 and De Monte Cara vê-se o mundo in 2014. He has been awarded the Order of the Dragon Plant - First Class and the Portuguese Order of Merit. SHEILA FARIA GLASER is an editor at the New York Times Magazine and has translated Jean Baudrillard’s Simulacra and Simulation and Michel Serres’s The Troubador of Knowledge. . .
Almeida, Manuel Antonio de. Memoirs of a Militia Sergeant. Washington DC. 1959. Pan American Union. Translated from the Portuguese by Linton L. Barrett. 245 pages. hardcover.

Less a novel in the usual sense than a series of scenes of everyday life in Rio of the time. The enduring qualities of the Memoirs clearly reside in the realistic description of life as it was actually lived in 19th century Brazil - though always with an element of satirical caricature in Rio de Janeiro ‘in the time of the king’, i.e. between 1803 and 1821, when Dom Joao VI, the King of Portugal, and his court resided in Brazil as a result of the Napoleonic invasion of the Iberian Peninsula. Rio at that time, despite its growing trade and new political importance was still a sleepy colonial city of less than 100,000 inhabitants, with customs which, as the Memoirs clearly demonstrate, were almost rustic in their lack of sophistication. The realism of Manuel Antonio is the more remarkable because he wrote during period when romanticism was much in vogue in Brazil. Nonetheless, the Memoirs attained a certain popularity from the time of their publication. Criticism long considered the work a forerunner of naturalism and realism in Brazil. Modern critics of the stature of Mario de Andrade. Eduardo Frieiro. Eugënio Gomes and Josué Montelo have convincingly established that the work belongs instead to that of the picaresque novel, which had its origins in Spain. Manuel Antonio, who relates the behavior of his characters within a particular setting with little regard for their psychological motivation, does indeed create a pageant of Brazilian life of an earlier day in the best tradition of the picaresque novel. MEMOIRS OF A MILITIA SERGEANT is the fourth English translation in the Latin American Classics Series. Sponsored by UNESCO and the Organization of American States, the publication of the series is undertaken to introduce and spread knowledge of representative works of Latin American literature among English and French-speaking peoples.

Manuel Antônio de Almeida (November 17, 1831 — November 28, 1861) was a Brazilian satirical writer, medician and teacher. He is famous for the book Memoirs of a Police Sergeant, written under the pen name Um Brasileiro (English: A Brazilian). He is the patron of the 28th chair of the Brazilian Academy of Letters. Almeida was born in Rio de Janeiro, to lieutenant Antônio de Almeida and Josefina Maria de Almeida. Few things are known about his years of primary studies — although he entered at the Medicine course in 1849, graduating in 1855. Financial difficulties inspired him to dedicate himself to literature and journalism. His magnum opus, Memoirs of a Police Sergeant, was initially published in feuilleton form during the years 1852-1853, in the journal Correio Mercantil. In 1858, he became the administrator of Tipografia Nacional, where he met Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis. Trying to enter in the political career, he would go to the city of Campos dos Goytacazes, embarking in the ship Hermes, in order to start his political research. However, the ship wrecked off near the shores of Macaé, and he died in the disaster.
Almino, Joao. The Five Seasons of Love. Austin. 2008. Host Publications. 9780924047503. Translated from the Portuguese by Elizabeth Jackson. Introduction by K. David Jackson. 156 pages. hardcover. Jackeet design by Anand Ramaswamy

In THE FIVE SEASONS OF LOVE, acclaimed Brazilian writer Joao Almino presents a compelling and sympathetic portrait of a woman whose life has not turned out as she anticipated, and whose once audacious dreams have been replaced by half-truths, failures, and frustration. To fulfill a pact made during her student days, fifty-five-year-old Ana Kauffman plans a party to celebrate the new millennium. As old friends resurface and the countdown to the new century draws near, Ana's past undergoes a series of unexpected revisions--beginning with the arrival of Berta, the newly minted post-op persona of Ana's former boyfriend Norberto. Set amidst the chaos of contemporary Brasilia, a place where even the most basic human affairs--love, friendship, sex, and work--can take unlikely shapes, Ana's story is both relentlessly modern and profoundly timeless. Winner of the Casa de las Americas 2003 Literary Award, THE FIVE SEASONS OF LOVE is an extraordinary novel by a writer at the height of his powers.

João Almino is a Brazilian novelist. He is the author of The Brasília Quintet, which consists of the novels Ideas on Where to Spend the End of the World, Samba-Enredo, The Five Seasons of Love (first published in Portuguese by Editora Record; published in Spanish by Alfaguara, México, and by Corregidor, in Argentina; in Italian by Editrice Il Sirente; Casa de las Americas 2003 Literary Award; in English by Host Publications, 2008); The Book of Emotions (shortlisted for the Zaffari & Bourbon Literary Award and the Portugal-Telecom Literary Award; Editora Record, 2008; Dalkey Archive Press, 2012) and Cidade Livre (Free City, Editora Record, 2010; Passo Fundo Zaffari & Bourbon Literary Award for best novel published in Portuguese from May 2009 to May 2011; shortlisted for the Jabuti Award 2011 and for the Portugal-Telecom Literary Award 2011; translated as Free City, it was published by Dalkey Archive Press in 2013). His most recent novel was published in Brazil in 2015: Enigmas da Primavera (Enigmas of Spring), which was published in English in 2016 by Dalkey Archive Press. He has also authored books of philosophical and literary essays. He taught at the National Autonomous University of
Alonso, Luis Ricardo. Territorio Libre. London. 1967. Peter Owen. Translated by Alan Brown. 266 pages.

Born in Spain, Alonso became an ambassador in the Castro government, then broke with the regime. His first novel is anti-revolutionary, depicting the betrayal of a disenchanted government official by his wife. An ideological novel of little literary significance.

Luis Ricardo Alonso (Parres, Asturias, June 1929 - Lancaster, Pennsylvania, USA, October 2015) was a Cuban-Spanish novelist. The son of a Spanish father and a Cuban mother, he emigrated to Cuba as a child with his family. He studied Law and Journalism in Havana , where he joined the Cuban People's Party. He collaborated with the magazine Bohemia , an opponent of the Fulgencio Batista regime. A supporter of the Cuban revolution, he participated in the clandestine struggle and in the overthrow of the dictator. He held important positions in the new regime of Fidel Castro: He was head of office at the Ministry of Education and ambassador to Peru, Norway, Switzerland and Great Britain. Finally, in 1965, he broke with the communist regime and settled in the United States. For many years he was a professor of Spanish Literature at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster in the United States, the city where he died at the age of 86.
Altamirano, Ignacio M. Christmas in the Mountains. Gainesville. 1961. University of Florida Press. Edited, Translated from the Spanish by and introduction by Harvey L. Johnson. 68 pages.

An idyllic, romantic novelette set in rural village.

Ignacio Manuel Altamirano Basilio (November 13, 1834 – February 13, 1893) was a Mexican lawyer, writer, journalist, teacher and politician. He was born in Tixtla, Guerrero, into an indigenous family; his father was appointed mayor of Tixtla in 1848, which gave the boy Ignacio Manuel, who was 14 at the time, the opportunity to go to school. He learned to read and write in his hometown. He made his first studies in Toluca, thanks to a scholarship granted by Ignacio Ramírez, of whom he was a disciple. In 1849 he studied at the Literary Institute of Toluca, and later at the Colegio de San Juan de Letrán for law. He belonged to academic and literary associations such as the Mexican Drama Conservatory, the Nezahualcóyotl Society, the Mexican Society of Geography and Statistics, the Liceo Hidalgo and the Álvarez Club. A great defender of liberalism, Altamirano took part in the Ayutla revolution in 1854 against santanismo, and later in the war of the Reformation. He also fought against the French invasion in 1863. After this period of military conflicts, Altamirano dedicated himself to teaching, working as a teacher in the National Preparatory School, in the School of Commerce and Administration, and in the National School of Teachers. He also worked in the press, where together with Guillermo Prieto and Ignacio Ramírez he founded the Correo de México, and with Gonzalo A. Esteva the literary magazine El Renacimiento. El Renacimiento published writers of all literary, ideological, and political tendencies, its main mission was to provoke the revival of Mexican literature and promote the notion of national unity and identity. Altamirano founded several newspapers and magazines such as: El Correo de México, El Renacimiento, El Federalista, La Tribuna and La República. In 1861, he served as a deputy in the Congress of the Union for three terms, during which he advocated free, secular and compulsory primary education. He was also Attorney General of the Republic, prosecutor, magistrate and president of the Supreme Court, as well as senior officer of the Ministry of Development. He also worked in the Mexican diplomatic service, serving as consul in Barcelona and Paris. Altamirano founded the Liceo de Puebla and the Escuela Normal de Profesores de México and wrote several highly successful books in his time, in which he cultivated different literary styles and genres, cultivating the short story, criticism, history, the essay, chronicles, biography, bibliographic studies, poetry, the novel. His literary works portray the Mexican society of the time. His critical studies were published in literary magazines in Mexico. His speeches have also been published. Altamirano loved the legends, customs, and descriptions of landscapes in Mexico. In 1867 he began to stand out and oriented his literature towards the affirmation of national values, he also worked as a literary historian and critic. He died in Italy in 1893 , on a diplomatic mission. On the centenary of his birth, his remains were deposited in the Rotunda of Illustrious Persons in Mexico City.
Altamirano, Ignacio M. El Zarco, the bandit. London. 1957. Folio Society. Translated from the Spanish by Mary Allt. 160 pages.

Emphasizes the equality of the mestizo and Indian compared to the Anglo-Saxon.

Ignacio Manuel Altamirano Basilio (November 13, 1834 – February 13, 1893) was a Mexican lawyer, writer, journalist, teacher and politician. He was born in Tixtla, Guerrero, into an indigenous family; his father was appointed mayor of Tixtla in 1848, which gave the boy Ignacio Manuel, who was 14 at the time, the opportunity to go to school. He learned to read and write in his hometown. He made his first studies in Toluca, thanks to a scholarship granted by Ignacio Ramírez, of whom he was a disciple. In 1849 he studied at the Literary Institute of Toluca, and later at the Colegio de San Juan de Letrán for law. He belonged to academic and literary associations such as the Mexican Drama Conservatory, the Nezahualcóyotl Society, the Mexican Society of Geography and Statistics, the Liceo Hidalgo and the Álvarez Club. A great defender of liberalism, Altamirano took part in the Ayutla revolution in 1854 against santanismo, and later in the war of the Reformation. He also fought against the French invasion in 1863. After this period of military conflicts, Altamirano dedicated himself to teaching, working as a teacher in the National Preparatory School, in the School of Commerce and Administration, and in the National School of Teachers. He also worked in the press, where together with Guillermo Prieto and Ignacio Ramírez he founded the Correo de México, and with Gonzalo A. Esteva the literary magazine El Renacimiento. El Renacimiento published writers of all literary, ideological, and political tendencies, its main mission was to provoke the revival of Mexican literature and promote the notion of national unity and identity. Altamirano founded several newspapers and magazines such as: El Correo de México, El Renacimiento, El Federalista, La Tribuna and La República. In 1861, he served as a deputy in the Congress of the Union for three terms, during which he advocated free, secular and compulsory primary education. He was also Attorney General of the Republic, prosecutor, magistrate and president of the Supreme Court, as well as senior officer of the Ministry of Development. He also worked in the Mexican diplomatic service, serving as consul in Barcelona and Paris. Altamirano founded the Liceo de Puebla and the Escuela Normal de Profesores de México and wrote several highly successful books in his time, in which he cultivated different literary styles and genres, cultivating the short story, criticism, history, the essay, chronicles, biography, bibliographic studies, poetry, the novel. His literary works portray the Mexican society of the time. His critical studies were published in literary magazines in Mexico. His speeches have also been published. Altamirano loved the legends, customs, and descriptions of landscapes in Mexico. In 1867 he began to stand out and oriented his literature towards the affirmation of national values, he also worked as a literary historian and critic. He died in Italy in 1893 , on a diplomatic mission. On the centenary of his birth, his remains were deposited in the Rotunda of Illustrious Persons in Mexico City.
Altamirano, Ignacio M. El Zarco, the bandit. New York. 1957. Duchnes. Translated from the Spanish by Mary Allt. 160 pages.

Emphasizes the equality of the mestizo and Indian compared to the Anglo-Saxon. (London:Folio Society, 1957).

Ignacio Manuel Altamirano Basilio (November 13, 1834 – February 13, 1893) was a Mexican lawyer, writer, journalist, teacher and politician. He was born in Tixtla, Guerrero, into an indigenous family; his father was appointed mayor of Tixtla in 1848, which gave the boy Ignacio Manuel, who was 14 at the time, the opportunity to go to school. He learned to read and write in his hometown. He made his first studies in Toluca, thanks to a scholarship granted by Ignacio Ramírez, of whom he was a disciple. In 1849 he studied at the Literary Institute of Toluca, and later at the Colegio de San Juan de Letrán for law. He belonged to academic and literary associations such as the Mexican Drama Conservatory, the Nezahualcóyotl Society, the Mexican Society of Geography and Statistics, the Liceo Hidalgo and the Álvarez Club. A great defender of liberalism, Altamirano took part in the Ayutla revolution in 1854 against santanismo, and later in the war of the Reformation. He also fought against the French invasion in 1863. After this period of military conflicts, Altamirano dedicated himself to teaching, working as a teacher in the National Preparatory School, in the School of Commerce and Administration, and in the National School of Teachers. He also worked in the press, where together with Guillermo Prieto and Ignacio Ramírez he founded the Correo de México, and with Gonzalo A. Esteva the literary magazine El Renacimiento. El Renacimiento published writers of all literary, ideological, and political tendencies, its main mission was to provoke the revival of Mexican literature and promote the notion of national unity and identity. Altamirano founded several newspapers and magazines such as: El Correo de México, El Renacimiento, El Federalista, La Tribuna and La República. In 1861, he served as a deputy in the Congress of the Union for three terms, during which he advocated free, secular and compulsory primary education. He was also Attorney General of the Republic, prosecutor, magistrate and president of the Supreme Court, as well as senior officer of the Ministry of Development. He also worked in the Mexican diplomatic service, serving as consul in Barcelona and Paris. Altamirano founded the Liceo de Puebla and the Escuela Normal de Profesores de México and wrote several highly successful books in his time, in which he cultivated different literary styles and genres, cultivating the short story, criticism, history, the essay, chronicles, biography, bibliographic studies, poetry, the novel. His literary works portray the Mexican society of the time. His critical studies were published in literary magazines in Mexico. His speeches have also been published. Altamirano loved the legends, customs, and descriptions of landscapes in Mexico. In 1867 he began to stand out and oriented his literature towards the affirmation of national values, he also worked as a literary historian and critic. He died in Italy in 1893 , on a diplomatic mission. On the centenary of his birth, his remains were deposited in the Rotunda of Illustrious Persons in Mexico City.
Alvarez Jr., Robert R. Familia: Migration and Adaptation in Baja and Alta California, 1800-1975. Berkeley. 1986. University Of California Press. 0520053470. 213 pages. hardcover.

Anthropologists, historians, and sociologists will find here a striking challenge to accepted explanations of the northward movement of migrants from Mexico into the United States. Alvarez investigates the life histories of pioneer migrants and their offspring, finding a human dimension to migration which centers on the family. Spanish, American, and English exploits paved the way for exchange between Baja and Alta California. Alvarez shows how cultural stability actually increased as migrants settled in new locations, bringing their common values and memories with them.

Robert R. Alvarez Jr.’s research interests include the application of anthropology to practical problem solving especially regarding minority communities in the United States and their countries of origin.
Alvarez, Julia. A Cafecito Story. White River Junction. 2001. Chelsea Green Publishing Company. 1931498008. Woodcuts by Belkis Ramirez. Afterword by Bill Eicchner. 58 pages. hardcover. Cover: Belkis Ramirez

Throughout the Dominican Republic and Central America it is a household ritual to offer a ‘cafecito’ (a small cup of dark, rich, potent coffee) to any visitor, especially a stranger. Now, in a story spanning Latin America and Nebraska, Julia Alvarez offers us A CAFECITO STORY. In North America, coffee is the morning lifeline between waking and working. In Central and South America, coffee is an economic lifeline, after oil the most important export commodity. Especially when coffee is grown sustainably, it links the First and Third Worlds in ways that are surprising and often delightful. For instance, North American songbirds winter in southern habitats where their survival is directly dependent on coffee farming practices. With lyric simplicity, A CAFECITO STORY tells the complex tale of a social beverage that bridges nations and unites people in trade, in words, in birds, and in love. The story unfolds through the eyes of Joe, a man with farming in his blood but an increasing sense of displacement from the natural world. While on holiday in the Dominican Republic, Joe learns about how coffee is grown and traded from Miguel, a Dominican coffee farmer. It is from Miguel and the other campesinos that Joe comes to understand the role of coffee in global trade, environmental degradation, and endangered songbird habitat. Initially overwhelmed, Joe eventually learns to live compatibly with the natural world. Human communication, in the form of the written word, the spoken word, and the shared cup of coffee gives him the power to face life’s challenges one cup at a time.

JULIA ALVAREZ was born, as she puts it, ‘by accident,’ in New York City, but shortly thereafter her family moved back to their native Dominican Republic. She spent her childhood there until her family was forced to flee due to political pressure. Her first book of poems, HOMECOMING, appeared in 1984. Her first novel, HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS, was published in 1990, followed four years later by IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES, which was a finalist for the National Book Award. She has also the author of the novel IN THE NAME OF SALOMÉ. She is a writer-in-residence at Middlebury College. She lives with her husband, Bill Eichner, in the Vermont countryside, but maintains close ties to her homeland through Alta Gracia, their organic coffee farm, established to demonstrate the ideas and principles of sustainable living. . BILL EICHNER, an ophthalmologist by trade, comes from Midwestern farm stock. He is also a gardener, chef, and the author of The New Family Cookbook (Chelsea Green, 2000). BELKIS RAMIREZ, who contributed the woodcuts for A CAFECITO STORY, is one of the most celebrated artists in the Dominican Republic.
Alvarez, Julia. Homecoming: Poems. New York. 1984. Grove Press. 0394620526. Issued Simultaneously In Cloth. 96 pages. paperback.

Alvarez's first book. Contains the poems: How I learned to sweep; Dusting; Making our beds; Master bed; Washing the windows; Storm windows; Hanging the wash; Ironing their clothes; Rolling dough; What could it be?; Posture lesson; New clothes; Orchids; Heroines.

Julia Alvarez is the author of five previous books of fiction, including HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS and IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES; a book of essays; five collections of poetry; and five books for children. She received the Hispanic Heritage Award in 2002. She lives in Vermont, where she is writer-in-residence at Middlebury College.
Alvarez, Julia. How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents. Chapel Hill. 1991. Algonquin Books. 0945575572. 290 pages. hardcover.

The Garcías - Dr. Carlos (Papi), his wife Laura (Mami), and their four daughters, Carla, Sandra, Yolanda, and Sofía - belong to the uppermost echelon of Spanish Caribbean society, descended from the conquistadores. Their family compound adjoins the palacio of the dictator's daughter. So when Dr. García's part in a coup attempt is discovered, the family must flee. They arrive in New York City in 1960 to a life far removed from their existence in the Dominican Republic. Papi has to find new patients in the Bronx. Mami, far from the compound and the family retainers, must find herself. Meanwhile, the girls try to lose themselves - by forgetting their Spanish, by straightening their hair and wearing fringed bell bottoms. For them, it is at once liberating and excruciating being caught between the old world and the new, trying to live up to their father's version of honor while accommodating the expectations of their American boyfriends. Acclaimed writer Julia Alvarez's brilliant and buoyant first novel sets the García girls free to tell their most intimate stories about how they came to be at home - and not at home - in America. It's a long way from Santo Domingo to the Bronx, but if anyone can go the distance, it's the Garcia girls. Four lively latinas plunged from a pampered life of privilege on an island compound into the big-city chaos of New York, they rebel against Mami and Papi's old-world discipline and embrace all that America has to offer.

Julia Alvarez is the author of five previous books of fiction, including HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS and IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES; a book of essays; five collections of poetry; and five books for children. She received the Hispanic Heritage Award in 2002. She lives in Vermont, where she is writer-in-residence at Middlebury College.
Alvarez, Julia. How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents. New York. 1992. Plume/New American Library. 0452268060. 290 pages. paperback.

The Garcías - Dr. Carlos (Papi), his wife Laura (Mami), and their four daughters, Carla, Sandra, Yolanda, and Sofía - belong to the uppermost echelon of Spanish Caribbean society, descended from the conquistadores. Their family compound adjoins the palacio of the dictator's daughter. So when Dr. García's part in a coup attempt is discovered, the family must flee. They arrive in New York City in 1960 to a life far removed from their existence in the Dominican Republic. Papi has to find new patients in the Bronx. Mami, far from the compound and the family retainers, must find herself. Meanwhile, the girls try to lose themselves - by forgetting their Spanish, by straightening their hair and wearing fringed bell bottoms. For them, it is at once liberating and excruciating being caught between the old world and the new, trying to live up to their father's version of honor while accommodating the expectations of their American boyfriends. Acclaimed writer Julia Alvarez's brilliant and buoyant first novel sets the García girls free to tell their most intimate stories about how they came to be at home - and not at home - in America. It's a long way from Santo Domingo to the Bronx, but if anyone can go the distance, it's the Garcia girls. Four lively latinas plunged from a pampered life of privilege on an island compound into the big-city chaos of New York, they rebel against Mami and Papi's old-world discipline and embrace all that America has to offer.

Julia Alvarez is the author of five previous books of fiction, including HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS and IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES; a book of essays; five collections of poetry; and five books for children. She received the Hispanic Heritage Award in 2002. She lives in Vermont, where she is writer-in-residence at Middlebury College.
Alvarez, Julia. In the Name of Salome. Chapel Hill. 2000. Algonquin Books. 1565122763. 357 pages. hardcover. Jacket image and design by Honi Werner. Cover photos: courtesy of Julia Alvarez. Author photo: Cameron Davidson.

This novel tells the story of two women - mother and daughter, one a poet, the other a teacher - and how they confronted the machismo in two Caribbean revolutions. Set in the politically chaotic Dominican Republic of the late nineteenth century; on the campuses of three American universities, and in the idealistic Communist Cuba of the 1960s, this story is based on the real lives of a volatile, opinionated, romantic, intrigue-loving family. Salomé Urena’s fervent patriotic poems turned her - at seventeen - into the Dominican Republic’s national icon. In stark contrast, her daughter, Camila, shy and self-effacing, bent to accommodate the demands of her father and brothers (a president, an ambassador, an international literary star)-trying to hide her preference for women, to stay out of the spotlight, and to offend no one. Whereas her mother dedicated her brief life to educating Dominican girls to serve their turbulent new nation, Camila spent her career anonymously explaining the Spanish pluperfect to upper-class American girls. We meet Camila in 1960 when she is sixty-five years old and about to retire from Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York. This is Camila’s last chance to choose a final destiny for herself In the process of deciding, Camila uncovers first the reality of her mother’s tragic personal life and, finally, where she must place her own kind of passion and commitment. Latina poet and university professor Alvarez brings many common bonds to this novel based on ‘La musa de la patria,’ Salomé Ureña, and her daughter, Profesora Camila Henriquez-Urena. Not the least of these is an undaunted female stance from inside a powerful Caribbean family. . JULIA ALVAREZ is the author of HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS, IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES (a National Book Award finalist), and YO! She has also published three collections of poetry and, most recently, SOMETHING TO DECLARE, a collection of essays. She lives in Vermont and in the Dominican Republic, where she and her husband run a coffee plantation. . .

Julia Alvarez is the author of five previous books of fiction, including HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS and IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES; a book of essays; five collections of poetry; and five books for children. She received the Hispanic Heritage Award in 2002. She lives in Vermont, where she is writer-in-residence at Middlebury College.
Alvarez, Julia. In the Time of the Butterflies. Chapel Hill. 1994. Algonquin Books. 1565120388. 325 pages. hardcover. Jacket design: Eddy Herch. Calligraphy: Carin Goldberg. Cover photograph: by John Blaustein

It is November 25, 1960, and the bodies of three beautiful, convent-educated sisters have been found near their wrecked Jeep at the bottom of a 150-foot cliff on the north coast of the Dominican Republic. El Caribe, the official newspaper, reports their deaths as an accident. It does not mention that a fourth sister lives. Nor does it explain that the sisters were among the leading opponents of Gen. Raphael Leonidas Trujillo’s dictatorship. It doesn’t have to. Everyone knows of Las Mariposas - ‘The Butterflies.’ Now, three decades later, Julia Alvarez, also a daughter of the Dominican Republic and long haunted by these sisters, immerses us in a tangled and dangerous moment in Hispanic Caribbean history to tell their story in the only way it can truly be understood - through fiction. In this brilliantly characterized novel, the voices of all four sisters - Minerva, Patria, Maria Teresa, and Dedé - speak across the decades, to tell their own stories - from hair ribbons to gunrunning to prison torture - and to describe the everyday horrors of life under Trujillo’s rule. The Butterflies were extraordinary women. Minerva, once the object of the dictator’s desire, had dared to publicly slap his face. Devout Patria found her calling to the uprising through the church. Alluring - and vain - Maria Teresa joined in pursuit of romance. Only Dedé, the practical one, the most diligent in her duty to family and tradition, kept apart. And only she survived to see that their names were remembered. Now, through the art and magic of Julia Alvarez’s imagination, the martyred Butterflies live again. And Dedé joins them as a heroine of equal courage.

Julia Alvarez was ten years old when her parents were forced to emigrate to the United States from the Dominican Republic, shortly before Trujillo was assassinated. Her first novel, HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS, published in 1991, was received with delight and acclaim. It was listed by Library Journal as one of the best books of the year, was named a Notable Book of 1991 by the New York Times Book Review and by the ALA, and was awarded the PEN Oakland/Josephine Miles Award for excellence in literature. A professor of English at Middlebury College, Alvarez lives with her husband in Vermont.
Alvarez, Julia. Saving the World. Chapel Hill. 2006. Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. 9781565125100. 368 pages. hardcover. Design and imaging by Honi Werner from a photo by Stephen Swintek/Stone/Getty Images.

Latina novelist Alma Huebner is suffering from writer’s block and is years past the completion date for yet another of her bestselling family sagas. Her husband, Richard, works for a humanitarian organization dedicated to the health and prosperity of developing countries and wants her help on an extended AIDS assignment in the Dominican Republic. But Alma begs off joining him: the publisher is breathing down her neck. She promises to work hard and follow him a bit later. The truth is that Alma is seriously sidetracked by a story she has stumbled across. It’s the story of a much earlier medical do-gooder. Spaniard Francisco Xavier Balmis, who in 1803 undertook to vaccinate the populations of Spain’s American colonies against smallpox. To do this, he required live ‘carriers’ of the vaccine. Of greater interest to Alma is Isabel Sendales y Gómez, director of La Casa de Expositos, who was asked to select twenty-two orphan boys to be the vaccine carriers. She agreed—with the stipulation that she would accompany the boys on the proposed two-year voyage. Her strength and courage inspire Alma, who finds herself becoming obsessed with the details of Isabel’s adventures. This resplendent novel-within-a-novel spins the disparate tales of two remark- able women, both of whom are swept along by machismo. In depicting their confrontation bf the great scourges of their respective eras, Alvarez exposes the conflict between altruism and ambition.

Julia Alvarez is the author of five previous books of fiction, including HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS and IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES; a book of essays; five collections of poetry; and five books for children. She received the Hispanic Heritage Award in 2002. She lives in Vermont, where she is writer-in-residence at Middlebury College.
Alvarez, Julia. Something To Declare: Essays. Chapel Hill. 1998. Algonquin Books. 1565121937. 300 pages. hardcover. Jacket design: Honi Werner. Jacket photo: Daniel Cima

Julia Alvarez’s three bestselling novels-HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS, IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES, and YO! - have sold over a half million copies in the United States and have been translated into nine foreign languages. Her three prizewinning volumes of poetry have established her as a major American poet. And her remarkably openhearted articles that appear regularly in many national magazines have made her singular voice familiar to many. Now, in her first book of nonfiction, Julia Alvarez offers two dozen personal essays about the two major (and interlocking) issues of her life-growing up with one foot in each of two cultures, and writing. In 1960, when Alvarez was ten years old, her father’s participation in a failed coup attempt against Rafael Trujillo, the repressive dictator of the Dominican Republic, resulted in the family’s self-imposed exile to New York City, where Dr. Alvarez set up a medical practice in the Bronx while his wife and four daughters set about the serious business of assimilation. That uprooting formed the thematic basis for two of Julia Alvarez’s novels. Her father’s revolutionary ties inspired the third, the story of one of Trujillo’s most infamous atrocities. SOMETHING TO DECLARE is about the influences those experiences have had on her work, and about the practical lessons she’s learned on her way to becoming the internationally acclaimed writer she now is. ‘Customs,’ the first half of SOMETHING TO DECLARE, examines the specific effects of exile-surviving the shock of New York City public school life; yearning to fit in; watching the Miss America contest for clues to ‘beauty,’ American-style; worrying about reactions to her published writing back on the Island. The essays in the second half, ‘Declarations,’ are about the writing and range from confession of how she supported her writing habit early on to the gritty details of her own actual writing process. One of the most revealing is ‘In the Name of the Novel’ in which she takes the reader along on a scouting trip in search of the subject of her next book. What’s unexpected is that she lets us watch as the project falters and then fails. . As an experienced teacher of creative writing, Julia Alvarez is a popular speaker on college campuses and famous for her receptivity to probing questions from her audiences and for her generous responses. Something to Declare captures the unique rapport between a writer and her readers. Julia Alvarez lives in Vermont with her husband. A professor of English literature at Middlebuty College, she has also taught at the University of Illinois, George Washington University, and at the Breadloaf Writers Conference. Her novels have received many honors, including ALA Notable Book of the Year and designation as a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist. . .

Julia Alvarez is the author of five previous books of fiction, including HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS and IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES; a book of essays; five collections of poetry; and five books for children. She received the Hispanic Heritage Award in 2002. She lives in Vermont, where she is writer-in-residence at Middlebury College.
Alvarez, Julia. The Other Side/El Otro Lado: Poems. New York. 1995. Dutton. 0525939229. 155 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Robin Locke Monda. Jacket painting by German Perez, 'Emigrating to the Sky', 1994.

Julia Alvarez has won enormous acclaim for her fiction, which includes HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS, winner of the 1991 PEN Oakland/Josephine Miles Award, and IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES, nominated for the 1995 National Book Critics Circle Award. ‘But long before Alvarez discovered her novelist’s voice, she was producing inspired and engaging poetry that helped launch one of the most vital movements in contemporary American letters: Latina literature. The poems in THE OTHER SIDE/EL OTRO LADO, collected here for the first time, reveal Alvarez’s mature voice and the full range of her poetic gift. The New York Times Book Review has praised Alvarez’s fiction as ‘powerful . . . beautifully captures the threshold experience of the new immigrant where the past is not yet a memory and the future remains an anxious dream.’ These same qualities characterize her poetry-from the ‘Making Up the Past’ poems, which explore a life of exile as lived by a young girl, to ‘The Joe Poems,’ a series of wonderfully sensual and funny love poems celebrating a middle-aged romance. The collection culminates in the twenty-one-part title poem about the poet’s return to her native Dominican Republic and the internal conflict and ultimate affirmation that journey occasioned. A final poem, ‘Estele,’ addressed to A mute Dominican child, stands as a magnificent coda to the themes that give this collection, so varied in style and tone, its compelling unity. Writing with a mastery of traditional forms coupled with a bold innovation and invention, attuned to the interplay of sound, sense, and the rhythm of two languages, Julia Alvarez here employs all the alchemy of her art to transform precious memory into unforgettable poetry. . JULIA ALVAREZ is the author of a 1984 book of poetry, HOMECOMING, and the novels HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS and IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES. She is currently professor of English at Middlebury College in Vermont. . .

Julia Alvarez is the author of five previous books of fiction, including HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS and IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES; a book of essays; five collections of poetry; and five books for children. She received the Hispanic Heritage Award in 2002. She lives in Vermont, where she is writer-in-residence at Middlebury College.
Alvarez, Julia. Yo!. Chapel Hill. 1997. Algonquin Books. 1565121570. 309 pages. hardcover. Cover: Illustration by: Robbin Gourley. Design by: Gwen Petruska. Author photo: Daniel Cima

Yolanda Garcia - Yo, for short - is the literary one in the family. Her first published novel, in which she made ‘characters’ out of her three sisters, her Mami and Papi, her grandparents, tias, tios, cousins, housemaids, and husbands was a big success. Now she’s famous and basking in the spotlight while her ‘characters’ find their naked and very recognizable selves dangling in that same blinding light. So what happens? Turnabout is fair play. Yolanda Garcia’s family and friends get their chance to tell the truth about Yo: how she’s always had to be center stage; that she’s been telling lies since the day she was born; about the year she went into therapy with her best friend and how Yo swore off sex; how her college professor kept trying to keep her from ruining her life and throwing away her talent; how she stole a plot for a short story from one of her students; how she fills the house her third husband built for her with voodoo offerings-’little things he mustn’t touch’-we]l, you get the idea. Everyone, from her sisters to her fame-obsessed stalker, rips into her. In the process, they create endearing self-portraits, while Yo (which also means ‘I’) is herself denied the privilege of speaking in her own defense. This zesty, daring novel is about what happens when an author really does ‘write what she knows.’ At once funny and poignant, intellectual and gossipy, lighthearted and layered in meaning, Yo! is, ironically and above all, a portrait of the artist. And with its bright colors, passion, and penchant for controversy, it’s a portrait that could come only from the palette of Julia Alvarez. ‘YO! works the same beguiling combination as HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS - a lively and good-natured surface over depths of serious questioning. Sisterhood, daughterhood, friendship, the pain of political exile, the complications of fame, all the hard questions are churned up in the wake of the writer’s central paradox: that she must betray secrets on the way to honesty, and tell dangerous lies if she is going to dare approach the truth.’ - ROSELLEN BROWN . . . . JULIA ALVAREZ is the author of two previous novels, HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS, which won the PEN Oakland/ Josephine Miles Award, and IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES, an American Library Association Notable Book and a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist, Julia Alvarez has also published three highly acclaimed books of poetry. Her essays, stories, and poems have appeared in many magazines, including The New York Times Magazine, Allure, The New Yorker, Hispanic Magazine, and USA Weekend. She lives with her husband in Vermont and teaches at Middlebury College. . .

Julia Alvarez is the author of five previous books of fiction, including HOW THE GARCIA GIRLS LOST THEIR ACCENTS and IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES; a book of essays; five collections of poetry; and five books for children. She received the Hispanic Heritage Award in 2002. She lives in Vermont, where she is writer-in-residence at Middlebury College.
Amado, Jorge. Captains of the Sands. New York. 1988. Avon Books. 0380897180. Translated from the Portuguese by Gregory Rabassa. 248 pages. paperback.

THE LITTLE BANDITS OF BAHIA - They call themselves ‘Captains of the sands,’ a gang of orphans and runaways who live by their wits and daring in the slums and sleazy back alleys of Bahia. Led by fifteen-year-old ‘Bullet,’ the band-including a crafty liar named ‘Legless,’ the intellectual ‘Professor,’ and the sexually precocious ‘Cat’ - pulls off heists and escapades against the rich and privileged of Brazil. But when a public outcry demands the capture of the ‘little criminals,’ the fate of these children becomes a poignant, intensely moving drama of love and freedom in a shackled land. Available for the first time in English, Jorge Amado’s classic - the sixth and final book of the early series he called his Bahian Novels’- captures the rich culture, vivid emotions, and wild landscape of Bahia with penetrating authenticity, and brilliantly displays the genius of Brazil’s most acclaimed author. ‘AMADO IS BRAZIL’S MOST ILLUSTRIOUS AND VENERABLE NOVELIST.’ - The New York Times.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands. New York. 1969. Knopf. Translated from the Portuguese by Harriet De Onis. 555 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Paul Bacon.

With the immediate success in 1962 of GABRIELA, CLOVE AND CINNAMON (see the back of the jacket for the burst of applause it evoked) Americans discovered the robust comedy and storytelling enchantment of Brazil’s most famous novelist, Jorge Amado. His new novel is just as wonderful - a book, a story, a heroine to fall in love with. Dona Flor is (literally) an adorable woman - with a body made for love, a mind of her own, a cozy disposition, a witty tongue, a kissable face, high moral principles - and she can cook, too. (Her cooking school is all the rage in Salvador.) One wants her to have everything. One wants her to escape from her monumental dragon of a mother into the arms of the best of husbands. One wants her to have - because she deserves it - all the honey and spice of life, ecstasy in bed, respect at all times, tenderness and tickles, a comfortable income, laughter, a sense of being always cared for. And she gets it all-but, alas, from two different men! The question: is it possible for a moral woman like Flor to enjoy two husbands at once? Yes! Thanks to the genius of Amado, who has found a way for Dona Flor to have both her husbands - without offending her own delicate scruples, or ours. How this is accomplished is told in a novel that is alive with joy and erotic hilarity, with the piquant color of life in Bahia, with hundreds of marvelous characters, from prominent ladies of high life and low life to political kingpins, underworld kings, poets, professors, babes, bouncers, and the devoted members of the Bahia Amateur Symphony Orchestra. And most marvelous, at its very center, Dona Flor herself - and her two husbands!

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands: A Moral and Amorous Tale. New York. 1977. Avon/Bard. 0380017962. Translated from the Portuguese by Harriet de Onis. 523 pages. paperback.

‘POETICAL, COMIC, HUMAN!’- The Washington Post. In this extraordinary adventure by Brazil’s foremost novelist, one wants Flor to have everything - including her roguish, passionate husband who died of his exertions; and her new husband, a considerate gentleman. In a country of many gods and even occasional miracles, Flor approaches the divine Exu and stirs up more than old memories. And only she knows she has two husbands - one living, one dead - each consummately skilled in his way in the infinite art of love. ‘Bawdy, brilliant, human and humorous, it is a novel full of unexpected delights. . . . It is everything a modern novel should be . . . . It would appear high time for Brazil’s Jorge Amado to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.’- Denver Post.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon. New York. 1974. Avon/Bard. 0380182750. Translated from the Portuguese by John L. Taylor & William L. Grossman. 426 pages. paperback.

GABRIELA came to llhéus from the backlands of Brazil, one of a flock of dirty, bedraggled migrant workers. Nacib, owner of the town’s most popular café, was so desperate to replace his cook that he hired Gabriela immediately. She soon proved to be not only an excellent chef, but—once scrubbed and decently clothed—a great beauty as well. And Nacib found himself owner of the most prosperous business and the most sought-after woman in town. ‘Enchanting,’ The Atlantic Monthly Press called Gabriela, the charm of this story is its pace and verisimilitude . . . a comedy vivid, believable, and entertaining.’

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon. New York. 1974. Avon/Bard. 0380182750. Translated from the Portuguese by John L. Taylor & William L. Grossman. 426 pages. paperback.

GABRIELA came to llhéus from the backlands of Brazil, one of a flock of dirty, bedraggled migrant workers. Nacib, owner of the town’s most popular café, was so desperate to replace his cook that he hired Gabriela immediately. She soon proved to be not only an excellent chef, but—once scrubbed and decently clothed—a great beauty as well. And Nacib found himself owner of the most prosperous business and the most sought-after woman in town. ‘Enchanting,’ The Atlantic Monthly Press called Gabriela, the charm of this story is its pace and verisimilitude . . . a comedy vivid, believable, and entertaining.’

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon. New York. 1962. Knopf. Translated from the Portuguese by John L. Taylor & William L. Grossman. 429 pages. hardcover. Typography, binding, and jacket design by WARREN CHAPPELL

In 1925-26, Ilhéus was booming. There was a record cacao crop, but because of a sandbar in the harbor, shipments could not be made direct but had to clear through and pay tribute to the larger port to the north, Bahia. The controversy over the removal of this sandbar is one of the threads that runs through the story and gives you a wonderful picture of politics in a provincial Brazilian city. And then, too, it was the year that Colonel Mendonça lived up to the inviolable unwritten law and, shot his wife and her lover when he caught them in flagrante delicto. But above all, it was the year that Gabriela moved in from the backlands, one of a flock of dirty, bedraggled migrant workers -but what a girl she turned out to be. Nacib, the Arab owner of the most popular café-restaurant in town, was in really serious trouble-he had lost his cook. Gabriela proved to be a superb cook and, once scrubbed and decently clothed, a great beauty as well. Nacib’s business boomed and, fat and foolish though he was, he found himself the happy possessor of a mistress who loved him and who soon became the most sought-after woman in the town. In this skillfully plotted novel there is a lusty and often humorous echo of the sly political machinations that control the life of every town, and the story crackles with intrigue as progress threatens the entrenched landowners and their hired assassins, just as it threatens the town’s social and sexual mores. And Gabriela moves serenely through it all. She wields her increasing power to enchant until that age-old prerogative heretofore exercised by the cuckolded is no longer de rigueur or even legal.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Gabriela, cravo e canela (Portuguese language edition). Sao Paulo. 1961. Livraria Martins Editora. 453 pages. paperback.

IN PORTUGUESE - GABRIELA came to llhéus from the backlands of Brazil, one of a flock of dirty, bedraggled migrant workers. Nacib, owner of the town’s most popular café, was so desperate to replace his cook that he hired Gabriela immediately. She soon proved to be not only an excellent chef, but—once scrubbed and decently clothed—a great beauty as well. And Nacib found himself owner of the most prosperous business and the most sought-after woman in town. ‘Enchanting,’ The Atlantic Monthly Press called Gabriela, the charm of this story is its pace and verisimilitude . . . a comedy vivid, believable, and entertaining.’

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Home Is the Sailor. New York. 1964. Knopf. Translated from the Portuguese by Harriet De Onis. 301 pages. hardcover. Typography, binding, and jacket design by WARREN CHAPPELL.

GOOD-NATURED, incompetent, friendly, and lustful-at sixty the crony of college students and high-living officials-Vasco Moscoso de Aragâo laments that his life as the son of a wealthy merchant has brought him no rank, degree, or title. So-though Vasco has never made a sea voyage-a friend gets him a license as a ship’s captain. Moving to Periperi in the suburbs of Bahia, he takes up with relish the life of an honored, retired old sea dog surrounded by nautical instruments, sea-going uniforms, and listeners eager for his reminiscences’ of the oceans and exotic lands that he has visited. Vasco is so endlessly and colorfully inventive that only a few of his canniest neighbors begin to suspect the truth. When the northbound good ship Ita comes into Bahia with her captain dead, Vasco-the only licensed captain in the area-is dragooned into completing the voyage up the coast to Belém as master (with the understanding that he will be free to call on the first mate for all important decisions). On the voyage. Vasco enjoys himself, whiling away the time in social activities and in pursuing a lady passenger of forty, to whom he becomes engaged. But deceiving sailors turns out not to be so easy as dazzling landlubbers, and what happens then and thereafter is almost (but not quite) beyond belief. Written with the narrative grace, humor, ribaldry, compassion, tenderness, and constant inventiveness of Jorge Amado’s popular GABRIELA, CLOVE AND CINNAMON, HOME IS THE SAILOR likewise rests (with Amado’s thistledown touch) on a kind of philosophical or metaphysical background. ‘What is truth, what reality?’-the book asks that eternal question, not ponderously, but as inherent in a triumph of the story-telling art.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Home Is the Sailor. New York. 1964. Knopf. Translated from the Portuguese by Harriet De Onis. 301 pages. hardcover.

GOOD-NATURED, incompetent, friendly, and lustful-at sixty the crony of college students and high-living officials-Vasco Moscoso de Aragâo laments that his life as the son of a wealthy merchant has brought him no rank, degree, or title. So-though Vasco has never made a sea voyage-a friend gets him a license as a ship’s captain. Moving to Periperi in the suburbs of Bahia, he takes up with relish the life of an honored, retired old sea dog surrounded by nautical instruments, sea-going uniforms, and listeners eager for his reminiscences’ of the oceans and exotic lands that he has visited. Vasco is so endlessly and colorfully inventive that only a few of his canniest neighbors begin to suspect the truth. When the northbound good ship Ita comes into Bahia with her captain dead, Vasco-the only licensed captain in the area-is dragooned into completing the voyage up the coast to Belém as master (with the understanding that he will be free to call on the first mate for all important decisions). On the voyage. Vasco enjoys himself, whiling away the time in social activities and in pursuing a lady passenger of forty, to whom he becomes engaged. But deceiving sailors turns out not to be so easy as dazzling landlubbers, and what happens then and thereafter is almost (but not quite) beyond belief. Written with the narrative grace, humor, ribaldry, compassion, tenderness, and constant inventiveness of Jorge Amado’s popular GABRIELA, CLOVE AND CINNAMON, HOME IS THE SAILOR likewise rests (with Amado’s thistledown touch) on a kind of philosophical or metaphysical background. ‘What is truth, what reality?’-the book asks that eternal question, not ponderously, but as inherent in a triumph of the story-telling art.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Home Is the Sailor. New York. 1964. Knopf. Translated from the Portuguese by Harriet De Onis. 301 pages. hardcover. Typography, binding, and jacket design by Warren Chappell

GOOD-NATURED, incompetent, friendly, and lustful-at sixty the crony of college students and high-living officials-Vasco Moscoso de Aragâo laments that his life as the son of a wealthy merchant has brought him no rank, degree, or title. So-though Vasco has never made a sea voyage-a friend gets him a license as a ship’s captain. Moving to Periperi in the suburbs of Bahia, he takes up with relish the life of an honored, retired old sea dog surrounded by nautical instruments, sea-going uniforms, and listeners eager for his reminiscences’ of the oceans and exotic lands that he has visited. Vasco is so endlessly and colorfully inventive that only a few of his canniest neighbors begin to suspect the truth. When the northbound good ship Ita comes into Bahia with her captain dead, Vasco-the only licensed captain in the area-is dragooned into completing the voyage up the coast to Belém as master (with the understanding that he will be free to call on the first mate for all important decisions). On the voyage. Vasco enjoys himself, whiling away the time in social activities and in pursuing a lady passenger of forty, to whom he becomes engaged. But deceiving sailors turns out not to be so easy as dazzling landlubbers, and what happens then and thereafter is almost (but not quite) beyond belief. Written with the narrative grace, humor, ribaldry, compassion, tenderness, and constant inventiveness of Jorge Amado’s popular GABRIELA, CLOVE AND CINNAMON, HOME IS THE SAILOR likewise rests (with Amado’s thistledown touch) on a kind of philosophical or metaphysical background. ‘What is truth, what reality?

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Home Is the Sailor. New York. 1979. Avon/Bard. 0380451875. Translated from the Portuguese by Harriet De Onis. 255 pages. paperback.

ADVENTURES BEYOND BELIEF. . . The sleepy Brazilian beach resort needed a hero. And when retired Captain Vasco Moscoso de Aragao arrives, the townspeople are enthralled by his tales of exploits and exotic romance on the five oceans. Through these vicarious voyages they meet dangers they had never taken on, and sinful, voluptuous women they, alas, had never bedded down. Only Chico Pacheco, the local hero whose storytelling eminence has been undermined, delves into the captains past-and discovers that he has never set foot on an oceangoing deck. But when the ship Ito comes into Bahia with her captain dead-and Captain Vasco is pressed into her service-the landlocked dreamer begins an adventure in love and seamanship that surpasses his fantasies. ‘Amado’s humor is fresh, innocent, and inventive, and his altogether delightful comedy, which has some profound things to say about the human desire for importance, has been given an exceptionally good translation by Harriet de Onis.’ - The New Yorker.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Jubiaba. New York. 1984. Avon/Bard. 0380885670. Paperback Original. Translated from the Portuguese by Margaret A. Neves. 294 pages. paperback.

‘AMADO HAS PROFOUND THINGS TO SAY’ - The New Yorker. Amado’s powerful new novel of emancipation and betrayal, set in Bahia in the early 1930s, pulses with the exotic tropical imaginings and passionate desires that have made Amado internationally renowned. JUBIABA is the story of Antonio Balduino, a street urchin who abandons a desperate life as a champion circus boxer and a balladeer to join the local workers in their struggle against oppression. The spirit of JIJBIABA, the medicine man who inspires Antonio in his youth, follows Antonio’s physical and spiritual odyssey through tragedy and despair, teaching him to ‘love all those. . .who were shaking off the fetters of slavery.’ ‘Amado’s strange and wonderful characters. . . his humanism, and his considerable powers of description’ result in a richness and warmth that are impossible to resist.’ - Washington Post. ‘Amado is Brazil’s most illustrious and venerable novelist.’ - New York Times.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. Jubiaba. New York. 1984. Avon/Bard. 0380885670. Paperback Original. Translated from the Portuguese by Margaret A. Neves. 294 pages. paperback. Jacket art by D. Pacinelli

‘AMADO HAS PROFOUND THINGS TO SAY’ - The New Yorker. Amado’s powerful new novel of emancipation and betrayal, set in Bahia in the early 1930s, pulses with the exotic tropical imaginings and passionate desires that have made Amado internationally renowned. JUBIABA is the story of Antonio Balduino, a street urchin who abandons a desperate life as a champion circus boxer and a balladeer to join the local workers in their struggle against oppression. The spirit of JIJBIABA, the medicine man who inspires Antonio in his youth, follows Antonio’s physical and spiritual odyssey through tragedy and despair, teaching him to ‘love all those. . .who were shaking off the fetters of slavery.’ ‘Amado’s strange and wonderful characters. . . his humanism, and his considerable powers of description’ result in a richness and warmth that are impossible to resist.’ - Washington Post. ‘Amado is Brazil’s most illustrious and venerable novelist.’ - New York Times.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. Jubiaba. New York. 1984. Avon/Bard. 0380885670. Paperback Original. Translated from the Portuguese by Margaret A. Neves. 294 pages. paperback. Jacket art by D. Pacinelli

‘AMADO HAS PROFOUND THINGS TO SAY’ - The New Yorker. Amado’s powerful new novel of emancipation and betrayal, set in Bahia in the early 1930s, pulses with the exotic tropical imaginings and passionate desires that have made Amado internationally renowned. JUBIABA is the story of Antonio Balduino, a street urchin who abandons a desperate life as a champion circus boxer and a balladeer to join the local workers in their struggle against oppression. The spirit of JIJBIABA, the medicine man who inspires Antonio in his youth, follows Antonio’s physical and spiritual odyssey through tragedy and despair, teaching him to ‘love all those. . .who were shaking off the fetters of slavery.’ ‘Amado’s strange and wonderful characters. . . his humanism, and his considerable powers of description’ result in a richness and warmth that are impossible to resist.’ - Washington Post. ‘Amado is Brazil’s most illustrious and venerable novelist.’ - New York Times.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Pen, Sword, Camisole: A Fable To Kindle a Hope. New York. 1986. Avon/Bard. 0380898314. Translated from the Portuguese by Helen R. Lane. 274 pages. paperback.

RIO. 1940. Full of ambition and hot air, an arrogant, pompous, and cruel Nazi colonel was conspiring to occupy a vacant chair in the Brazilian Academy of Letters. Add to this outrage, this rank defilement, the fact that he wanted the very seat recently vacated by celebrated poet Antonio Bruno, a lover of many women and one city, Paris, whose fall to the Germans had killed him as decisively as a Fascist bullet in the heart. But what force on earth could keep the colonel’s fat bottom from resting on a velvet seat of the Immortal Forty? It would take an audacious plan spawned by the cunning minds of two ageing academicians . . . the irresistible sexuality of the women Bruno had loved . . . and a will to win against the odds-in Jorge Amado’s wonderful, high-spirited tale full of satire and broad humor that reaches back through the mock-heroic tradition to carry a message of hope and courage for the battles of today.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Pen, Sword, Camisole: A Fable To Kindle a Hope. Boston. 1985. David Godine. 0879235527. Translated from the Portuguese by Helen R. Lane. 276 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration by James Steinberg.

It is 1940. In Rio de Janeiro, a crisis is brewing. The brilliant womanizing poet, Antonio Bruno, has just died, and his seat in the Brazilian Academy of Letters is vacant. Who will replace him? Colonel Agnaldo Sampaio Pereira, chief of security of the New State Dictatorship, who welcomed Nazi control with unqualified joy, resolves it shall be he. But he does not count on the resistance organized by two intrepid octogenarians who rally to their standard a powerful group as determined to keep the colonel out of the Academy as he is to get in. Thus battle is engaged, in which the international forces of Nazism and the national forces of reaction and totalitarianism unite against two old men and four remarkable women-a typically fiery actress, a dressmaker who is not averse to a little part-time paid companionship, the wife of one of Brazil’s richest men, and an industrialist’s radical daughter-all former mistresses of the poet Bruno. Amado subtitled his novel ‘A Fable to Kindle a Hope.’ It is a just description, because this book, with its great, glorious doses of wit, is a ferocious and heartening cry for freedom.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Pen, Sword, Camisole: A Fable To Kindle a Hope. Boston. 1985. Godine. 0879235527. Translated from the Portuguese by Helen R. Lane. 276 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration by James Steinberg

It is 1940. In Rio de Janeiro, a crisis is brewing. The brilliant womanizing poet, Antonio Bruno, has just died, and his seat in the Brazilian Academy of Letters is vacant. Who will replace him? Colonel Agnaldo Sampaio Pereira, chief of security of the New State Dictatorship, who welcomed Nazi control with unqualified joy, resolves it shall be he. But he does not count on the resistance organized by two intrepid octogenarians who rally to their standard a powerful group as determined to keep the colonel out of the Academy as he is to get in. Thus battle is engaged, in which the international forces of Nazism and the national forces of reaction and totalitarianism unite against two old men and four remarkable women-a typically fiery actress, a dressmaker who is not averse to a little part-time paid companionship, the wife of one of Brazil’s richest men, and an industrialist’s radical daughter-all former mistresses of the poet Bruno. Amado subtitled his novel ‘A Fable to Kindle a Hope.’ It is a just description, because this book, with its great, glorious doses of wit, is a ferocious and heartening cry for freedom.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Pen, Sword, Camisole: A Fable To Kindle a Hope. New York. 1986. Avon/Bard. 0380898314. Translated from the Portuguese by Helen R. Lane. 274 pages. paperback.

It is 1940. In Rio de Janeiro, a crisis is brewing. The brilliant womanizing poet, Antonio Bruno, has just died, and his seat in the Brazilian Academy of Letters is vacant. Who will replace him? Colonel Agnaldo Sampaio Pereira, chief of security of the New State Dictatorship, who welcomed Nazi control with unqualified joy, resolves it shall be he. But he does not count on the resistance organized by two intrepid octogenarians who rally to their standard a powerful group as determined to keep the colonel out of the Academy as he is to get in. Thus battle is engaged, in which the international forces of Nazism and the national forces of reaction and totalitarianism unite against two old men and four remarkable women-a typically fiery actress, a dressmaker who is not averse to a little part-time paid companionship, the wife of one of Brazil’s richest men, and an industrialist’s radical daughter-all former mistresses of the poet Bruno. Amado subtitled his novel ‘A Fable to Kindle a Hope.’ It is a just description, because this book, with its great, glorious doses of wit, is a ferocious and heartening cry for freedom. ON JORGE AMADO: ‘Amado’s strange and wonderful characters. his humanism, and his considerable powers of description result in a richness and warmth that are impossible to resist.’ - THE WASHINGTON POST. ‘It would be hard to find an English counterpart to Candide in Voltaire’s time, and hard to find a writer in English-at least since the death of James Thurber-with as gay an imagination and as fond a sense of the absurd as the Brazilian, Jorge Amado.’ - THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW. ‘[Amado] has the narrative art to a superlative degree, the ability to create three-dimensional characters, a deep awareness of the problems of his country and his epoch, a style as flexible and colorful as it is lyrical . . . . One hardly knows what to admire most: the dexterity with which Amado can keep half a dozen plots spinning; the gossamer texture of the writing; or his humor, tenderness, and humanity.’ - THE SATURDAY REVIEW. ‘No other Latin American writer is more genuinely admired by his peers, nor has any other exerted so great a creative influence on the course of Latin American fiction.’ - THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Sea of Death. New York. 1984. Avon/Bard. 038088559x. Paperback Original. Translated from the Portuguese by Gregory Rabassa. 273 pages. paperback. Jacket art by D. Pacinelli

‘BRAZILS LEADING MAN OF LETTERS. . . JORGE AMADO IS ADORED AROUND THE WORLD!’ Newsweek. Here in SEA OF DEATH are the sea’s unconquerable mysteries and the robust yearnings of seafaring men- a world of storms and smugglers, of reckless passion and star-crossed love. Set in Amado’s lush Bahia, Brazil, in the early 1930s, SEA OF DEATH tells the story of Guma and Livia, lovers whose triumphs and tribulations mirror the dark imperatives of the world around them. ‘The men from dockside only have one path in life,’ Amado writes, ‘the path of the sea. They follow it, it’s their fate. The sea owns all of them: ’ ‘Amado has profound things to say: ’ The New Yorker. ‘Amado’s strange and wonderful characters . . . his humanism, and his considerable powers of description result in a richness and warmth that are impossible to resist: ’ Washington Post.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Sea of Death. New York. 1984. Avon/Bard. 038088559x. Paperback Original. Translated from the Portuguese by Gregory Rabassa. 273 pages. paperback. Jacket art by D. Pacinelli

‘BRAZILS LEADING MAN OF LETTERS. . . JORGE AMADO IS ADORED AROUND THE WORLD!’ Newsweek. Here in SEA OF DEATH are the sea’s unconquerable mysteries and the robust yearnings of seafaring men- a world of storms and smugglers, of reckless passion and star-crossed love. Set in Amado’s lush Bahia, Brazil, in the early 1930s, SEA OF DEATH tells the story of Guma and Livia, lovers whose triumphs and tribulations mirror the dark imperatives of the world around them. ‘The men from dockside only have one path in life,’ Amado writes, ‘the path of the sea. They follow it, it’s their fate. The sea owns all of them: ’ ‘Amado has profound things to say: ’ The New Yorker. ‘Amado’s strange and wonderful characters . . . his humanism, and his considerable powers of description result in a richness and warmth that are impossible to resist: ’ Washington Post.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. Shepherds of the Night. New York. 1988. Avon Books. 0380754711. Translated from the Portuguese by Harriet De Onis. 372 pages. paperback.

‘MAGIC AT WORK!’ Saturday Review On the Bahian waterfront, days are sun-blazed and languorous, nights are filled with the struggles of men and the caresses of women - and only the prostitutes hold regular jobs. ‘An epic journey into passion.it ripples with the special inner music that has made Amado’s work popular the world over. Like all Amado’s novels, this one is filled with coppery women and the men who chase them through nights of song and stars.’ - Time Magazine.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Shepherds of the Night. New York. 1978. Avon/Bard. 0380399903. Translated from the Portuguese by Harriet De Onis. 372 pages. paperback.

‘MAGIC AT WORK’ - Saturday Review . . . On the Bahian waterfront the days are sun-blazed and languorous, the nights are filled with the struggles of men and the caresses of women—and only the prostitutes hold regular jobs. SHEPHERDS OF THE NIGHT is . . . . ‘an epic journey into passion, music, gambling, a bit of fighting and all manner of discursive side trips . . . it ripples with the special inner music that has made Amado’s work popular the world over. Like all Amado’s novels, this one is filled with the coppery women of Bahia and the men who chase them through nights of song and stars.’ – Time.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Shepherds of the Night. New York. 1967. Knopf. 365 pages. hardcover. Cover: George Salter

This new novel by the brilliantly entertaining Brazilian author of Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon is set in his beloved Bahia. It is a swarming tale of raffish folk-prostitutes, cardsharpers, and pimps, drunks and homeless Don Juans and Messalinas in the teeming life of a tropical port. It tells three interlinked and cumulating stories: that of a marriage, that of a christening, and that of a siege. What happens in Shepherds of the Night was what was certain to happen when the cleverest of the Bahian Don Juans married an out-of-town prostitute who soon bored him and restricted his life, when an unmarried mother insisted upon having her fatherless child christened in a church, and when a group of homeless Bahians erected their shacks on private property. SHEPHERDS OF THE NIGHT is at once funny and sad. It is full of laughter and nostalgia, of macumba and candomblé (Brazilian voodoo), of charms and incantations and wild song. It is full of Jorge Amado’s untamed Rabelaisian poetry, of crooked laughing characters, of the sounds, smells, sights, tastes, and touches of GABRIELA, OF HOME IS THE SAILOR, of THE TWO DEATHS OF QUINCAS WATERYELL, of the world that has made Jorge Amado an esteemed and popular teller of tales.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Showdown. New York. 1988. Bantam Books. 0553051741. Translated from the Portuguese by Gregory Rabassa. 422 pages. hardcover. Author photo (c) 1987 Stephen Fischer. Cover art (c) 1988 Keith Batcheller

SHOWDOWN is a novel of audacious scope. Its central character is Tocaia Grande, a city in the Bahian backlands of Brazil’s cacao region, the scene of four previous Amado novels. But the master is full of playful surprises. Everything in Showdown is seen from a new perspective, as dozens of individual lives develop into the collective story of a community. Tocaia Grande was born when the henchman of a cacao plantation ambushed a rival colonel vying for power at the start of this century, in a time when honor took precedence over law, and courage came before power. It was a renegade beginning, in its grittiness, violence, pettiness and feel of dirt and blood, not unlike the birth of our great American West. In this paradise of the frontier that Amado has created live wonderful characters culled from the author’s childhood-prostitutes, murderers, fugitives, migrant workers and even a flimflamming Turk. All of them are placed under the leadership of Natário da Fonseca, a gunslinger who is eventually appointed captain of the National Guard. These are the men and women Amado knows intimately, and has great faith in. He takes us into their very souls, chronicling their passions and their desires. And through their story, the story of the miraculous growth of a truly singular town is revealed. SHOWDOWN is the most daring novel in Jorge Amado’s long and distinguished career. In it he opens his heart, and leaves us with a tale that will live long in our memories.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Showdown. New York. 1988. Bantam Books. Translated from the Portuguese by Gregory Rabassa. paperback. Author photo (c) 1987 Stephen Fischer. Cover art (c) 1988 Keith Batcheller

At age seventy-five, Jorge Amado is Brazil’s greatest living literary institution with more than eight million copies of his books in print. Internationally acclaimed as a spinner of earthy, tropical tales, he has written twenty-one novels which have been translated into forty-six languages and published in sixty countries. Now he presents a work full of violence and courage, sex and adventure, more brilliant and more adventurous than his two most celebrated books, DONA FLOR AND HER TWO HUSBANDS and GABRIELA, CLOVE AND CINNAMON. Even by Amado’s own standards, the anticipation and excitement surrounding SHOWDOWN have made its publication a major international event. Three years in the writing, the book is his largest, most magnificent work in decades and was an instant bestseller in Brazil. SHOWDOWN is a novel of audacious scope. Its central character is Tocaia Grande, a city in the Bahian backlands of Brazil’s cacao region, the scene of four previous Amado novels. But the master is full of playful surprises. Everything in Showdown is seen from a new perspective, as dozens of individual lives develop into the collective story of a community. Tocaia Grande was born when the henchman of a cacao plantation ambushed a rival colonel vying for power at the start of this century, in a time when honor took precedence over law, and courage came before power. It was a renegade beginning, in its grittiness, violence, pettiness and feel of dirt and blood, not unlike the birth of our great American West. In this paradise of the frontier that Amado has created live wonderful characters culled from the author’s childhood-prostitutes, murderers, fugitives, migrant workers and even a flimflamming Turk. All of them are placed under the leadership of Natário da Fonseca, a gunslinger who is eventually appointed captain of the National Guard. These are the men and women Amado knows intimately, and has great faith in. He takes us into their very souls, chronicling their passions and their desires. And through their story, the story of the miraculous growth of a truly singular town is revealed. SHOWDOWN is the most daring novel in Jorge Amado’s long and distinguished career. In it he opens his heart, and leaves us with a tale that will live long in our memories.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. Tent of Miracles. New York. 1971. Knopf. 039444826x. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby. 382 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Paul Bacon

Bahia - home of Dona Flor and Gabriela, land of heroic talkers, daring doers, Lucullan cooks, inexhaustible lovers, beautiful black women, beautiful white women, and mulatas exquisite beyond the praise of poets-is at its most gloriously Bahian, as Jorge Amado plies us with love, food, voodoo, wit and wonder, surrounds us with a cast of hundreds . . . (INCLUDING: fiery Black Dorotéia, who has the heart of a turtledove; indomitable Major Damião de Souza; Fausto Pena, unrequited lover and poetl; Ana Mercedes, undulating reportress in mini-skirt and mini-blouse; capoeira artists, policemen, professors, drunks, whores, directors of tourism, devotees of African gods, members of the Society of Medical Writers) . . . and introduces us to his richest creation. Behold him! The late, lovable-roguish Pedro Archanjo, street-corner Socrates, passionate anthropologist, candomblé practitioner, acknowledged dean of the living university of Bahia’s demimonde and author of the momentous works in defense of miscegenation whose ‘discovery’ by James D. Levenson (great gringo scholar, lover, and Nobel Prize winner) has plunged Bahia into the fantastic intrigue and carnival of the Archanjo Centennial Celebration. As the celebrants pour forth from every street and house, as all doors fly open unlocking the secret life of Bahia, the novel moves back into the misty past (especially into the Tent of Miracles, once the living heart of Salvador, presided over by Lidio Corró, miracle painter, vendor of voodoo and vaudeville, tooth-yanker, impresario of the magic lantern) and forward into the intoxicating present, in search of the true Pedro Archanjo. Savant? Seducer? Riffraff? Redeemer? Like DONA FLOR AND HER TWO HUSBANDS, like GABRIELA, CLOVE AND CINNAMON, this new novel by Brazil’s most famous and beloved writer embraces the reader. in its generous, ebullient vision of earth and man.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. Tent of Miracles. New York. 1971. Knopf. 039444826x. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby. 382 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Paul Bacon

Bahia - home of Dona Flor and Gabriela, land of heroic talkers, daring doers, Lucullan cooks, inexhaustible lovers, beautiful black women, beautiful white women, and mulatas exquisite beyond the praise of poets-is at its most gloriously Bahian, as Jorge Amado plies us with love, food, voodoo, wit and wonder, surrounds us with a cast of hundreds . . . (INCLUDING: fiery Black Dorotéia, who has the heart of a turtledove; indomitable Major Damião de Souza; Fausto Pena, unrequited lover and poetl; Ana Mercedes, undulating reportress in mini-skirt and mini-blouse; capoeira artists, policemen, professors, drunks, whores, directors of tourism, devotees of African gods, members of the Society of Medical Writers) . . . and introduces us to his richest creation. Behold him! The late, lovable-roguish Pedro Archanjo, street-corner Socrates, passionate anthropologist, candomblé practitioner, acknowledged dean of the living university of Bahia’s demimonde and author of the momentous works in defense of miscegenation whose ‘discovery’ by James D. Levenson (great gringo scholar, lover, and Nobel Prize winner) has plunged Bahia into the fantastic intrigue and carnival of the Archanjo Centennial Celebration. As the celebrants pour forth from every street and house, as all doors fly open unlocking the secret life of Bahia, the novel moves back into the misty past (especially into the Tent of Miracles, once the living heart of Salvador, presided over by Lidio Corró, miracle painter, vendor of voodoo and vaudeville, tooth-yanker, impresario of the magic lantern) and forward into the intoxicating present, in search of the true Pedro Archanjo. Savant? Seducer? Riffraff? Redeemer?

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Tent of Miracles. New York. 1978. Avon/Bard. 0380410206. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby. 401 pages. paperback.

‘A MOST ENJOYABLE ROMP’ - Gregory Rabassa, The New York Times. . . ‘A very rich and exotic novel . . . TENT OF MIRACLES tells the story of Pedro Archanjo, mestizo, self-taught ethnologist, apostle of miscegenation, laborer, cult priest, and bon vivant . . . Amado’s joyous, exuberant, almost magical descriptions of festivals, puppet shows, African rituals, local legends, fascinating customs, strange and wonderful characters . . . his enthusiasm for his subject, his proficiency in its lore, his humanism, and his considerable powers of description result in a richness and warmth that are impossible to resist.’ - The Washington Post. . . ‘TENT OF MIRACLES may well be Amado’s masterpiece.’ - The Christian Science Monitor.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Tent of Miracles. New York. 1971. Knopf. 039444826x. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby. 382 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Paul Bacon

Bahia - home of Dona Flor and Gabriela, land of heroic talkers, daring doers, Lucullan cooks, inexhaustible lovers, beautiful black women, beautiful white women, and mulatas exquisite beyond the praise of poets-is at its most gloriously Bahian, as Jorge Amado plies us with love, food, voodoo, wit and wonder, surrounds us with a cast of hundreds . . . (INCLUDING: fiery Black Dorotéia, who has the heart of a turtledove; indomitable Major Damião de Souza; Fausto Pena, unrequited lover and poetl; Ana Mercedes, undulating reportress in mini-skirt and mini-blouse; capoeira artists, policemen, professors, drunks, whores, directors of tourism, devotees of African gods, members of the Society of Medical Writers) . . . and introduces us to his richest creation. Behold him! The late, lovable-roguish Pedro Archanjo, street-corner Socrates, passionate anthropologist, candomblé practitioner, acknowledged dean of the living university of Bahia’s demimonde and author of the momentous works in defense of miscegenation whose ‘discovery’ by James D. Levenson (great gringo scholar, lover, and Nobel Prize winner) has plunged Bahia into the fantastic intrigue and carnival of the Archanjo Centennial Celebration. As the celebrants pour forth from every street and house, as all doors fly open unlocking the secret life of Bahia, the novel moves back into the misty past (especially into the Tent of Miracles, once the living heart of Salvador, presided over by Lidio Corró, miracle painter, vendor of voodoo and vaudeville, tooth-yanker, impresario of the magic lantern) and forward into the intoxicating present, in search of the true Pedro Archanjo. Savant? Seducer? Riffraff? Redeemer? Like DONA FLOR AND HER TWO HUSBANDS, like GABRIELA, CLOVE AND CINNAMON, this new novel by Brazil’s most famous and beloved writer embraces the reader. in its generous, ebullient vision of earth and man.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. Tent of Miracles. Madison. 2003. University Of Wisconsin Press. 029918644x. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby Merello. Introduction by Ilan Stavans. 380 pages. paperback. Cover illustration by PhotoDisc

Bahia - home of Dona Flor and Gabriela, land of heroic talkers, daring doers, Lucullan cooks, inexhaustible lovers, beautiful black women, beautiful white women, and mulatas exquisite beyond the praise of poets-is at its most gloriously Bahian, as Jorge Amado plies us with love, food, voodoo, wit and wonder, surrounds us with a cast of hundreds . . . (INCLUDING: fiery Black Dorotéia, who has the heart of a turtledove; indomitable Major Damião de Souza; Fausto Pena, unrequited lover and poetl; Ana Mercedes, undulating reportress in mini-skirt and mini-blouse; capoeira artists, policemen, professors, drunks, whores, directors of tourism, devotees of African gods, members of the Society of Medical Writers) . . . and introduces us to his richest creation. Behold him! The late, lovable-roguish Pedro Archanjo, street-corner Socrates, passionate anthropologist, candomblé practitioner, acknowledged dean of the living university of Bahia’s demimonde and author of the momentous works in defense of miscegenation whose ‘discovery’ by James D. Levenson (great gringo scholar, lover, and Nobel Prize winner) has plunged Bahia into the fantastic intrigue and carnival of the Archanjo Centennial Celebration. As the celebrants pour forth from every street and house, as all doors fly open unlocking the secret life of Bahia, the novel moves back into the misty past (especially into the Tent of Miracles, once the living heart of Salvador, presided over by Lidio Corró, miracle painter, vendor of voodoo and vaudeville, tooth-yanker, impresario of the magic lantern) and forward into the intoxicating present, in search of the true Pedro Archanjo. Savant? Seducer? Riffraff? Redeemer?

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Tent of Miracles. New York. 1971. Knopf. 039444826x. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby. 382 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Paul Bacon

Bahia - home of Dona Flor and Gabriela, land of heroic talkers, daring doers, Lucullan cooks, inexhaustible lovers, beautiful black women, beautiful white women, and mulatas exquisite beyond the praise of poets-is at its most gloriously Bahian, as Jorge Amado plies us with love, food, voodoo, wit and wonder, surrounds us with a cast of hundreds . . . (INCLUDING: fiery Black Dorotéia, who has the heart of a turtledove; indomitable Major Damião de Souza; Fausto Pena, unrequited lover and poetl; Ana Mercedes, undulating reportress in mini-skirt and mini-blouse; capoeira artists, policemen, professors, drunks, whores, directors of tourism, devotees of African gods, members of the Society of Medical Writers) . . . and introduces us to his richest creation. Behold him! The late, lovable-roguish Pedro Archanjo, street-corner Socrates, passionate anthropologist, candomblé practitioner, acknowledged dean of the living university of Bahia’s demimonde and author of the momentous works in defense of miscegenation whose ‘discovery’ by James D. Levenson (great gringo scholar, lover, and Nobel Prize winner) has plunged Bahia into the fantastic intrigue and carnival of the Archanjo Centennial Celebration. As the celebrants pour forth from every street and house, as all doors fly open unlocking the secret life of Bahia, the novel moves back into the misty past (especially into the Tent of Miracles, once the living heart of Salvador, presided over by Lidio Corró, miracle painter, vendor of voodoo and vaudeville, tooth-yanker, impresario of the magic lantern) and forward into the intoxicating present, in search of the true Pedro Archanjo. Savant? Seducer? Riffraff? Redeemer?

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Tent of Miracles (DUSTJACKET ONLY). New York. 1971. Knopf. 039444826x. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby. DUSTJACKET ONLY. Jacket design by Paul Bacon

THIS IS ONLY THE DUSTJACKET - Bahia - home of Dona Flor and Gabriela, land of heroic talkers, daring doers, Lucullan cooks, inexhaustible lovers, beautiful black women, beautiful white women, and mulatas exquisite beyond the praise of poets-is at its most gloriously Bahian, as Jorge Amado plies us with love, food, voodoo, wit and wonder, surrounds us with a cast of hundreds . . . (INCLUDING: fiery Black Dorotéia, who has the heart of a turtledove; indomitable Major Damião de Souza; Fausto Pena, unrequited lover and poetl; Ana Mercedes, undulating reportress in mini-skirt and mini-blouse; capoeira artists, policemen, professors, drunks, whores, directors of tourism, devotees of African gods, members of the Society of Medical Writers) . . . and introduces us to his richest creation. Behold him! The late, lovable-roguish Pedro Archanjo, street-corner Socrates, passionate anthropologist, candomblé practitioner, acknowledged dean of the living university of Bahia’s demimonde and author of the momentous works in defense of miscegenation whose ‘discovery’ by James D. Levenson (great gringo scholar, lover, and Nobel Prize winner) has plunged Bahia into the fantastic intrigue and carnival of the Archanjo Centennial Celebration. As the celebrants pour forth from every street and house, as all doors fly open unlocking the secret life of Bahia, the novel moves back into the misty past (especially into the Tent of Miracles, once the living heart of Salvador, presided over by Lidio Corró, miracle painter, vendor of voodoo and vaudeville, tooth-yanker, impresario of the magic lantern) and forward into the intoxicating present, in search of the true Pedro Archanjo. Savant? Seducer? Riffraff? Redeemer?

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Tereza Batista Home From the Wars. New York. 1975. Knopf. 0394487524. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby. 555 pages. hardcover. Photo by Alfred A. Knopf. Jacket design by Paul Bacon

No writer alive has given us more enchanting heroines. First, Gabriela-all spice, all clove and cinnamon. Next the modest Dona Flor-deservedly adored (and at the same time!) by her two husbands. And now, with all the gusto for the human carnival, all the comicality and warmth that have endeared this most famous of Brazilian novelists to American readers, Jorge Amado adds a crowning jewel to his (and Bahia’s) diadem of splendid women. Behold her, Tereza Batista-inspiration to painters, poets, and sculptors (not to mention sailors on shore leave), teacher of the ignorant, lover of the powerful (and powerful lover), healer of the sick, champion of the downtrodden, seasoned veteran-at the peak of her beauty-of life’s wars. No wonder the people of Bahia call her, in awe and delight, Tereza of the Thousand Nicknames-all complimentary! Gaze on Tereza ‘with her honey sweetness, her swaying walk, her joy in living, her color like copper.’ Follow Tereza from her birth into direst poverty and bad luck (orphaned before she knew her parents, enslaved at the age of 12) to the great day when she turns the tables on that most splenetic and sadistic of slaveholders, the black-hearted Captain Justo Duarte da Rosa. From her education in grammar, love, and self-esteem as last mistress (established in a mansion fit for a millionairess) of the noble patriarch, Dr. Emiliano Guedes. From her Lysistratan strategies as chief-of-staff of the armies of heroic whores on strike, defying a police order formally entided ‘Heigh-Ho, Heigh-Ho, It’s Back to Work We Go,’ to her ultimate recognition as Bahia’s best- beloved, blazing Empress of the Brazilian Samba, marvelous Muse, Protectress, Font of Wisdom, the most desired and admired courtesan of city and environs, her own woman, honored by all. Tereza Batista-rebounding from every buffet stronger (and more delicious) than before. Trier progress is told in a novel bursting with ebullient episodes and erotic hilarity, with compassion and color and, best of all, with just about the entire (and entirely fascinating) population of Bahia. Once again Jorge Amado-celebrating beauty and Bahia-has given us a woman, a world, a view of life, to fall in love with.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. Tereza Batista: Home From the War. New York. 1975. Knopf. 0394487524. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby. 555 pages. hardcover. Photo by Alfred A. Knopf. Jacket design by Paul Bacon

Behold her, Tereza Batista-inspiration to painters, poets, and sculptors (not to mention sailors on shore leave), teacher of the ignorant, lover of the powerful (and powerful lover), healer of the sick, champion of the downtrodden, seasoned veteran-at the peak of her beauty-of life’s wars. No wonder the people of Bahia call her, in awe and delight, Tereza of the Thousand Nicknames-all complimentary! Gaze on Tereza ‘with her honey sweetness, her swaying walk, her joy in living, her color like copper.’ Follow Tereza from her birth into direst poverty and bad luck (orphaned before she knew her parents, enslaved at the age of 12) to the great day when she turns the tables on that most splenetic and sadistic of slaveholders, the black-hearted Captain Justo Duarte da Rosa. From her education in grammar, love, and self-esteem as last mistress (established in a mansion fit for a millionairess) of the noble patriarch, Dr. Emiliano Guedes. From her Lysistratan strategies as chief-of-staff of the armies of heroic whores on strike, defying a police order formally entided ‘Heigh-Ho, Heigh-Ho, It’s Back to Work We Go,’ to her ultimate recognition as Bahia’s best- beloved, blazing Empress of the Brazilian Samba, marvelous Muse, Protectress, Font of Wisdom, the most desired and admired courtesan of city and environs, her own woman, honored by all. Tereza Batista-rebounding from every buffet stronger (and more delicious) than before.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Tereza Batista: Home From the Wars. New York. 1977. Avon/Bard. 0380017520. Translated from the Portuguese Barbara Shelby. 558 pages. paperback.

AH, TEREZA! Her story unfolds with brilliance and luminous intensity, a masterpiece of contemporary literature written by Brazil’s foremost novelist. It is the story of Tereza, the twelve-year-old girl who is sold into slavery by her aunt. It is the story of Tereza, the young woman, who is jailed for defending her lover only to find him untrue. And it is the story of Tereza, reigning goddess of love - inspiration to poets, painters, and sailors on leave; mistress of a noble patriarch; chief-of-staff to the armies of whores on strike; and triumphant Queen of the Samba - desired, admired, and honored by all. ‘Amado has the narrative art to a superlative degree. . . . One hardly knows what to admire most: the dexterity with which he can keep half a dozen plots spinning, the gossamer texture of his writing, or his humor, tenderness, and humanity.’ - Saturday Review.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. The Discovery of America by the Turks. New York. 2012. Penguin Books. 9780143106982. Translated from the Portuguese by Gregory Rabassa. Foreword by José Saramago. 79 pages. paperback.

For the first time in English: legendary Brazilian author Jorge Amado’s spirited novella about Arab immigrants to South America - published for the centennial of Amado’s birth. Two Arab immigrants - ’Turks,’ as Brazilians call them – arrive in the rough Brazilian frontier on the same ship in 1903, hoping to find a future. They rub shoulders with gunslingers and plantation owners, and also tangle with merchants, one of whom is desperate to marry off his impossible daughter. Thus ensues a farcical drama that produces, in a humorous twist, the unlikeliest of suitors in this whimsical Brazilian take on The Taming of the Shrew. ‘Delightful. . . A wonder of the art of narration [by] the voice, the feeling, and the joy of Brazil.’ - José Saramago, from the Foreword.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. The Golden Harvest. New York. 1992. Avon Books. 0380761009. Paperback Original. Translated from the Portuguese by Clifford E. Landers. 359 pages. paperback. Cover illustration: Terry Widener

The colonials who survived the violent early days of cacao farming thirty years past have since grown prosperous and respectable. But avarice and blood still nourish the rich, fertile soil of Bahia. A dangerous cabal of exporters has set out to ruin the wealthy plantation owners by pandering to their insatiable lusts - a pitiless strategy that will ensnare all whose lives depend on the golden crop . . . from exploited migrant workers and embittered intellectuals to idle playboys, their faithless wives and faithful whores. And as crooked business deals and secret alliances destroy families and fortunes, battle lines are drawn in the violent land of plenty - setting friend against friend, brother against brother . . . and reluctant saint against willing sinner.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. The Miracle of the Birds. New York. 1983. Targ Editions. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby Merello. 16 pages. hardcover. Cover: Ronald Gordon

It all happened in the region of Piranhas, Alagoas state, on the banks of the São Francisco River, home to Captain Lindolfo Ezequiel and his wife, Sabô. The Captain was famous for his prowess as a gunslinger and for having wed the most desired woman in the region, all of which demanded a great deal of physical vigor and constant nurturing of his reputation as a killer. One day, along came Ubaldo Capadócio, a tall and good-looking caboclo with a deft hand at the arts of literature and popular music. In addition to authoring cordel poetry, at a push he could play harmonica like no other. The poet was in hot demand the length and breadth of the region to animate baptisms, weddings and even funerals. He was also given to philandering, breaking hearts wherever he went, and was known to keep two families, one in Bahia and another in Sergipe, having sired nine children with his three wives. In Piranhas, Ubaldo Capadócio falls head-over-heels for the wife of Lindolfo Ezequiel. Oblivious to the danger, he ends up in bed with Sabô while the Captain is away on business. But Ezequiel comes back early, and in order to save his hide and become the hero of this famous tale, Ubaldo Capadócio has to call on the support of numerous witnesses, a flock of birds and just a little help from Providence. In THE MIRACLE OF THE BIRDS, Jorge Amado turns a well-loved oral folk tale into the stuff of literature. This brief narrative, somewhere between a short story and a novella, is a tale of infidelity and dishonour typical of the popular tradition of the northeastern hinterlands. With his customary good humour and narrative flair, the author recovers and eternalizes this raucous tale, which had long enjoyed the ear of the people and done the rounds of backlands.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. The Swallow and the Tom Cat. New York. 1982. Delacorte Press. 0440083257. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby Merello. Designed by Joan Stoliar With Illustrations by Carybe. 96 pages. hardcover. Cover: Illustrated by Caryb?. Book and jacket design copyright (c) 1982 Joan Stoliar

What a fine world this would be if a swallow could tall in love with a stray cat and the two of them could live happily ever after. In this marvelous dreamworld there is no prejudice at all between creatures or people high and low Jorge Amado, the internationally best-selling Brazilian novelist has written a delightful fable that could become the favorite gift between star-crossed lovers everywhere. Although this is indeed a fantasy in which Dawn and Morning and Spring and The Wind are memorable characters along with Miss Swallow and the Striped Cat the Reverend Parrot and the Old Owl, Amado fans will be cheered by the same storyteller’s art, the wild imagination, the lusty humor, and the philosophical asides of the master himself. Jorge Amado brings a richness of meaning to the simple tale of long ago when the Swallow and the Tom Cat fell in love.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. The Swallow and the Tom Cat: A Love Story. New York. 1982. Delacorte Press. 0440083257. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby Merello. Designed by Joan Stoliar With Illustrations by Carybe. 96 pages. hardcover. Cover: Illustrated by Carybe. Book and jacket design copyright (c) 1982 Joan Stoliar

What a fine world this would be if a swallow could tall in love with a stray cat and the two of them could live happily ever after. In this marvelous dreamworld there is no prejudice at all between creatures or people high and low Jorge Amado, the internationally best-selling Brazilian novelist has written a delightful fable that could become the favorite gift between star-crossed lovers everywhere. Although this is indeed a fantasy in which Dawn and Morning and Spring and The Wind are memorable characters along with Miss Swallow and the Striped Cat the Reverend Parrot and the Old Owl, Amado fans will be cheered by the same storyteller’s art, the wild imagination, the lusty humor, and the philosophical asides of the master himself. Jorge Amado brings a richness of meaning to the simple tale of long ago when the Swallow and the Tom Cat fell in love.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. The Two Deaths of Quincas Wateryell. New York. 1965. Knopf. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby. 99 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Emil Antonucci

An apparently ‘correct’ and mild-mannered civil servant in Bahia, Joaquim Scares da Cunha, suddenly leaves home, a terrnagant wife, and a daughter who is growing up to be like her mother-and embarks on a bibulous life in the teeming slums of the city. A sore disgrace to his extremely proper family, he consorts with bums, pimps, prostitutes, and fishermen. He dies. The family has his body divested of its filthy, tattered clothes and dressed as Joaquim Scares da Cunha would have dressed in his proper days. But his second self (called Quincas Wateryell by his cronies after a famous occasion on which, drinking water in the belief that it was white rum, he let out a long-remembered yell of ‘Waaaaaaaaaater!’) gradually reasserts itself, First his daughter, standing vigil beside his coffin, notices that he is smiling. Then she believes that he has spoken to her. Then four of his special cronies take over the vigil. They pour white rum into the corpse’s mouth, steal his ‘proper’ clothes, re-dress him in his tatters, and take him on a wild tour of his old haunts, believing Mm to be still alive. It all ends on a fishing boat during a thunderstorm (Quincas had predicted that he would die at sea), when the corpse appears to stand up and dive overboard to a watery death. In reality, this is a paean to natural life as against false bourgeois standards. The members of the family, Quincas Wateryell himself, and his male and numerous female cronies-all are convincingly and amusingly portrayed. The voluptuous, dirty, noisy, stinking human atmosphere of the Bahia underworld is magnificently evoked. It is a tale that would have delighted Mark Twain.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. The Two Deaths of Quincas Wateryell. New York. 1980. Avon/Bard. 0380500477. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby. Illustrated by Emil Antonucci. 97 pages. paperback.

KING OF THE HONKY-TONKS . . . After a merry decade of dissipation and revelry among the bums, the pimps, and the prostitutes, Quincas Wateryell, king of the voluptuous lowlife of Bahia, dies. His prim family loses no time in rechaining the corpse to the yoke of respectability. But even in his tight clothes and middle-class coffin, Quincas still sneers at them. And when four of his cronies and a bottle of rum arrive at the wake and take over the vigil. Quincas decides the party might be too good to miss. Once again, Jorge Amado, the man The New York Times has called ‘the most significant of contemporary Brazilian novelists,’ magnificently evokes the raw and raunchy flavor of Bahia, and serves up the spirited notion that all is not over when all is over.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. The Two Deaths of Quincas Wateryell (DUSTJACKET ONLY). New York. 1965. Knopf. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby. DUSTJACKET ONLY. Jacket design by Emil Antonucci

THIS IS ONLY THE DUSTJACKET - An apparently ‘correct’ and mild-mannered civil servant in Bahia, Joaquim Scares da Cunha, suddenly leaves home, a terrnagant wife, and a daughter who is growing up to be like her mother-and embarks on a bibulous life in the teeming slums of the city. A sore disgrace to his extremely proper family, he consorts with bums, pimps, prostitutes, and fishermen. He dies. The family has his body divested of its filthy, tattered clothes and dressed as Joaquim Scares da Cunha would have dressed in his proper days. But his second self (called Quincas Wateryell by his cronies after a famous occasion on which, drinking water in the belief that it was white rum, he let out a long-remembered yell of ‘Waaaaaaaaaater!’) gradually reasserts itself, First his daughter, standing vigil beside his coffin, notices that he is smiling. Then she believes that he has spoken to her. Then four of his special cronies take over the vigil. They pour white rum into the corpse’s mouth, steal his ‘proper’ clothes, re-dress him in his tatters, and take him on a wild tour of his old haunts, believing Mm to be still alive. It all ends on a fishing boat during a thunderstorm (Quincas had predicted that he would die at sea), when the corpse appears to stand up and dive overboard to a watery death. In reality, this is a paean to natural life as against false bourgeois standards. The members of the family, Quincas Wateryell himself, and his male and numerous female cronies-all are convincingly and amusingly portrayed. The voluptuous, dirty, noisy, stinking human atmosphere of the Bahia underworld is magnificently evoked. It is a tale that would have delighted Mark Twain.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. The Violent Land. New York. 1979. Avon/Bard. 0380476967. Translated from the Portuguese by Samuel Putnam. 276 pages. paperback.

CHOCOLATE GOLD . . . The siren-song of the lush, cocoa-growing forests of Bahia lures them all-the adventurers, the assassins, the gamblers, the brave and beautiful women. It is not a gentle song, but a song of greed, madness, and blood. It is a song that promises riches untold, or death for the price of a swig of rum, a song most cannot resist-until it is too late-not Margot, the golden blonde prostitute who comes for love; not Cabral, the talented, unscrupulous lawyer who works for one of the cacao colonels’; and not Juca, whose ruthless quest to reap the jungle’s harvest plants the seeds of his own destruction. Against the violent, colorful backdrop of Brazil’s ‘cacao-rush-a phenomenon that rivals California’s gold rush in drama, tragedy, and humor-Jorge Amado weaves together the fates of two landowning families involved in a bloody feud over a tract of virgin forest to which neither has a rightful claim. In his foreword to this edition, the author has written, ‘No other of my books is as dear to me; in it lie my roots; it is of the blood from which I was created.’

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. The Violent Land. New York. 1945. Knopf. Translated from the Portuguese by Samuel Putnam. 333 pages. hardcover. Cover: Harry Roth

THE VIOLENT LAND is a novel in which striking individuals clash and merge. The unrelenting and often bloody struggle between Colonel Horacio da Silveira and the Badaró brothers for an area of virgin forest involves the boom town of Ilhéos and the surrounding countryside. Amado recounts the course oL that war between titans in a novel peopled by dozens of astonishing figures, packed with fascinating incident, and pervaded with a sinister and gripping atmosphere. Brazilian critics regard it as a great novel; there will be a multitude of readers here to agree with them. In the opening up of southern Bahia, Brazil experienced a ‘cacao-rush’ that more than matched California’s gold rush in drama, tragedy, and brawling humor. That pell-mell drive to be first to harvest gold from the unbelievably fertile cacao-producing lands was taken by Jorge Amado-an outstanding novelist of Brazil’s active literary world-as the background for his famous novel, Terras do sem fim. In Samuel Putnam, Senhor Amado has found a translator who deserves to be called a re-creator. The result is a lusty, credible, and sometimes breathless picture of a now lost way of life that readers in the United States will find at once strange for its tropical lushness and familiar for its frontier flavor.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. The Violent Land. New York. 1965. Knopf. Translated from the Portuguese by Samuel Putnam. Includes A New Forward by The Author. 336 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Ellen Raskin

In THE VIOLENT LAND, which Knopf first published in English in 1945, the author of GABRIELA, CLOVE AND CINNAMON wrote a a novel in which avid and ruthless individuals clash and merge. The unrelenting and often bloody struggle between Colonel Horacio da Silveira and the Badard brothers for an area of virgin forest involves the boom town of Ilhéus and its surrounding countryside. Amado recounts the course of that war between titans in a narrative peopled by dozens of remarkable men and women, a narrative packed with incident and pervaded by a sinister and gripping atmosphere. Brazilian critics long have regarded it as a great novel. In the opening up of the southern part of Bahia, Brazil experienced a ‘cacao rush’ that matched California’s gold rush in drama, tragedy, and brawling humor. That pell-mell drive to be the first to harvest gold and its fruits from the unbelievably fertile cacao-producing soil was taken by Amado as the background of THE VIOLENT LAND. In the late Samuel Putnam, he found a translator deserving to be called a re-creator. The result is a lusty, credible, sometimes breathless picture of a now lost way of life which readers in our more temperate zone will find both strange for its tropical lushness and overt passions and familiar for its frontier flavor. It has always been ranked with Amado’s best work.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. The Violent Land. New York. 1965. Knopf. Translated from the Portuguese by Samuel Putnam. Includes A New Forward by The Author. 336 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Ellen Raskin

In THE VIOLENT LAND, which Knopf first published in English in 1945, the author of GABRIELA, CLOVE AND CINNAMON wrote a a novel in which avid and ruthless individuals clash and merge. The unrelenting and often bloody struggle between Colonel Horacio da Silveira and the Badard brothers for an area of virgin forest involves the boom town of Ilhéus and its surrounding countryside. Amado recounts the course of that war between titans in a narrative peopled by dozens of remarkable men and women, a narrative packed with incident and pervaded by a sinister and gripping atmosphere. Brazilian critics long have regarded it as a great novel. In the opening up of the southern part of Bahia, Brazil experienced a ‘cacao rush’ that matched California’s gold rush in drama, tragedy, and brawling humor. That pell-mell drive to be the first to harvest gold and its fruits from the unbelievably fertile cacao-producing soil was taken by Amado as the background of THE VIOLENT LAND. In the late Samuel Putnam, he found a translator deserving to be called a re-creator. The result is a lusty, credible, sometimes breathless picture of a now lost way of life which readers in our more temperate zone will find both strange for its tropical lushness and overt passions and familiar for its frontier flavor. It has always been ranked with Amado’s best work.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. The War of the Saints. New York. 1993. Bantam Books. 0553095374. Translated from the Portuguese by Gregory Rabassa. 357 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration and design by Bascove

The statue of Saint Barbara of the Thunder, most holy of icons, is bound for the city of Bahia to be enshrined at the Museum of Sacred Art. Despite all precautions, however, the unthinkable has happened: The lovely statue has vanished. His reputation on the line, the curator of the exhibit cries foul. But the truth is that the image has not been stolen. As the boat that was to deliver her reached port, the image was transformed into a living, breathing woman. At the dock the awakened Saint Barbara stepped into the milling crowd on the quay and disappeared into the city. Like Saint Barbara herself, the festival comes to life in the streets of Bahia. Amid the cinnamon and tobacco, amid the sound of singing and berimbau drums, rumors fly, scandals erupt, intrigues swirl, and passions burn hotly . . . In another part of the city, a young girl named Manela suffers at the hands of her pious aunt Adalgisa, a woman willing to crack her niece’s skull to save her soul. Manela has slipped away from her repressive aunt to spend a few hours with the handsome Miro. But a glorious afternoon of feasting, drinking, and dancing at a religious festival that winds through the sunny streets of Bahia instantly turns sour when Aunt Adalgisa catches Manela red- handed. She locks up Manela in the Cloister of the Penitents, there to languish. But as Saint Barbara’s magical influence begins to cast its spell over the city, no one’s life will remain unchanged.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. The War of the Saints. New York. 1993. Bantam Books. 0553095374. Translated from the Portuguese by Gregory Rabassa. 357 pages. paperback. Jacket illustration and design by Bascove

The statue of Saint Barbara of the Thunder, most holy of icons, is bound for the city of Bahia to be enshrined at the Museum of Sacred Art. Despite all precautions, however, the unthinkable has happened: The lovely statue has vanished. His reputation on the line, the curator of the exhibit cries foul. But the truth is that the image has not been stolen. As the boat that was to deliver her reached port, the image was transformed into a living, breathing woman. At the dock the awakened Saint Barbara stepped into the milling crowd on the quay and disappeared into the city. Like Saint Barbara herself, the festival comes to life in the streets of Bahia. Amid the cinnamon and tobacco, amid the sound of singing and berimbau drums, rumors fly, scandals erupt, intrigues swirl, and passions burn hotly . . . In another part of the city, a young girl named Manela suffers at the hands of her pious aunt Adalgisa, a woman willing to crack her niece’s skull to save her soul. Manela has slipped away from her repressive aunt to spend a few hours with the handsome Miro. But a glorious afternoon of feasting, drinking, and dancing at a religious festival that winds through the sunny streets of Bahia instantly turns sour when Aunt Adalgisa catches Manela red- handed. She locks up Manela in the Cloister of the Penitents, there to languish. But as Saint Barbara’s magical influence begins to cast its spell over the city, no one’s life will remain unchanged.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. The War of the Saints. New York. 1993. Bantam Books. 0553095374. Translated from the Portuguese by Gregory Rabassa. 357 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration and design by Bascove

The internationally acclaimed author of SHOWDOWN and DONA FLOR AND HER TWO HUSBANDS, Jorge Amado has been hailed as Brazil’s foremost novelist and one of the great writers of our time. Now, in The War of the Saints, he invites us into an exuberant and extraordinary tale in which freedom rises in the face of fear, love triumphs over a reign of terror, and the mundane turns mystical in the blink of a beautiful woman’s eye. The statue of Saint Barbara of the Thunder, most holy of icons, is bound for the city of Bahia to be enshrined at the Museum of Sacred Art. Despite all precautions, however, the unthinkable has happened: The lovely statue has vanished. His reputation on the line, the curator of the exhibit cries foul. But the truth is that the image has not been stolen. As the boat that was to deliver her reached port, the image was transformed into a living, breathing woman. At the dock the awakened Saint Barbara stepped into the milling crowd on the quay and disappeared into the city. Like Saint Barbara herself, the festival comes to life in the streets of Bahia. Amid the cinnamon and tobacco, amid the sound of singing and berimbau drums, rumors fly, scandals erupt, intrigues swirl, and passions burn hotly . . . In another part of the city, a young girl named Manela suffers at the hands of her pious aunt Adalgisa, a woman willing to crack her niece’s skull to save her soul. Manela has slipped away from her repressive aunt to spend a few hours with the handsome Miro. But a glorious afternoon of feasting, drinking, and dancing at a religious festival that winds through the sunny streets of Bahia instantly turns sour when Aunt Adalgisa catches Manela red- handed. She locks up Manela in the Cloister of the Penitents, there to languish. But as Saint Barbara’s magical influence begins to cast its spell over the city, no one’s life will remain unchanged. Jorge Amado’s prodigious gifts as a storyteller, the richness of his detail, and the sheer force of his language combine in a narrative as seductive and enchanting as Saint Barbara herself- a novel that is at once a sensual adventure and a comic masterpiece. Skillfully weaving together the lives of his characters with insight into the nature of love and religion, Amado demonstrates, with charm and compassion, that his ultimate cause is humanity.

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Amado, Jorge. Tieta. New York. 1980. Avon/Bard. 038050815x. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby Merello. 672 pages. paperback.

RETURN OF THE PRODIGAL DAUGHTER. Banished for promiscuity, Tieta returns to the seaside village of Agreste after twenty-six years. Thinking she’s now a rich, respectable widow, her mercenary family welcomes her with open arms. But when a group of entrepreneurs tries to erect a factory on the paradisical beaches of Agreste, Tieta is forced to reveal her true identity For the only way she can save the town is to call upon her close connections in Sao Paulo’s highest political and financial circles-as only the Madam of the city’s ritziest bordello can. Tieta is a heroine to be treasured with Jorge Amado’s other extraordinary women: Dona Flor, Tereza Batista, Gabriela. A fully realized character, practically jumping off the pages,’ said Book list, ‘Amado is as marvelous as ever.’

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia.
Amado, Jorge. Tieta. New York. 1979. Knopf. 039450139x. Translated from the Portuguese by Barbara Shelby Merello. 674 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Paul Bacon

In the delectable tradition of Jorge Amado’s spirited, sexy, adorable heroines - Dona Flor and Gabriela among them - here is Tieta, lustrous, sparkling, a thorough Brazilian beauty. At forty-four a widow, a vision of feminine charm and modernity, she takes the town by storm - her native town of Agreste in Bahia, to which she has just returned after a twenty-six-year absence. She is amiable, talkative, generous. And she is rich. She has been - her family doesn’t know, no one in Agreste knows - the madam of a splendid brothel frequented by tycoons, politicos, men of power. And when an unscrupulous industrial giant plots to build a factory that will certainly pollute Tieta’s lovely demi-paradisal birthplace, her Big Political Connections stand her in good stead-a boon to her fellow townspeople. The intrigues that follow, entangling virtually the entire (high and low) population of Agreste, are in counterpoint to Tieta’s own tender idyll with her innocent seminarian nephew, Ricardo, as well as the whirling flirtations of the young ‘stepdaughter’ she has brought back with her from Sao Paulo. All is told in the uniquely exhilarating Amado manner-comic and moving, bawdy and sweet. And by the time the facts of Tieta’s checkered past slip out, and the hounds of propriety (and greed) are baying at her heels, she has become so dear to the reader, it seems unthinkable that her adventures should come to anything short of a completely satisfactory (if not, perhaps, altogether respectable) conclusion!

Jorge Amado de Faria (August 10, 1912 - August 6, 2001) was a Brazilian writer of the Modernist school. He was the best-known of modern Brazilian writers, his work having been translated into some 30 languages and popularized in film, notably Dona Flor and her Two Husbands (Dona Flor e Seus Dois Maridos) in 1978. His work dealt largely with the poor urban black and mulatto communities of Bahia. Amado was born in a fazenda (‘farm’) in the inland of the city of Itabuna, in the southern part of the Brazilian state of Bahia, son of João Amado de Faria and D. Eulália Leal. The farm Amado was born in was precisely located on the village of Ferradas, which though today is a district of Itabuna, at the time was administered by the town of Ilhéus. That is why he considered himself a citizen of Ilhéus. In the large cocoa plantation, Amado knew the misery and the struggles of the people working the earth, living in almost slave conditions, which were to be a theme always present in his later works (for example, the notable Terras do Sem Fim of 1944). When he was only one year old the family moved to Ilhéus, a coastal city, where he spent his childhood. He attended high school in Salvador, the capital of the state. During that period Amado began to collaborate with several magazines and took part in literary life, as one of the founders of the Modernist ‘Rebels’ Academy’. Amado published his first novel, O País do Carnaval, in 1931, at age 18. Later he married Matilde Garcia Rosa and had a daughter, Lila, in 1933. The same year he published his second novel, Cacau, which increased his popularity. Amado’s leftist activities made his life difficult under the dictatorial regime of Getulio Vargas: in 1935 he was arrested for the first time, and two years later his books were publicly burned. His works were banned from Portugal, but in the rest of Europe he gained great popularity with the publication of Jubiabá in France. The book had enthusiastic reviews, including that of Nobel Prize Award winner Albert Camus. Being a militant, from 1941 to 1942 Amado was compelled to go into exile to Argentina and Uruguay. When he returned to Brazil he separated from Matilde Garcia Rosa. In 1945 he was elected to the National Constituent Assembly, as a representative of the Brazilian Communist Party (PCB) (he received more votes than any other candidate in the state of São Paulo). He signed a law granting freedom of religious faith. The same year he remarried, this time to the writer Zélia Gattai. In 1947 he had a son, João Jorge. The same year his party was declared illegal, and its members arrested and persecuted. Amado chose exile once again, this time in France, where he remained until he was expelled in 1950. His first daughter, Lila, had died in 1949. From 1950 to 1952 Amado lived in Czechoslovakia, where another daughter, Paloma, was born. He also travelled to the Soviet Union, winning the Stalin Peace Prize in 1951. On his return to Brazil in 1955, Amado abandoned active political life, leaving the Communist Party one year later: from that period on he dedicated himself solely to literature. His second creative phase began in 1958 with Gabriela, Cravo e Canela, which was described by Jean-Paul Sartre as ‘the best example of a folk novel’: Amado abandoned, in part, the realism and the social themes of his early works, producing a series of novels focusing mainly on feminine characters, devoted to a kind of smiling celebration of the traditions and the beauties of Bahia. His depiction of the sexual customs of his land was much to the scandal of the 1950s Brazilian society: for several years Amado could not even enter Ilhéus, where the novel was set, due to threats received for the alleged offense to the morality of the city’s women. On April 6, 1961 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Literature. He received the title of Doctor honoris causa from several Universities in Brazil, Portugal, Italy, Israel and France, as well as other honors in almost every South American country, including Obá de Xangô (santoon) of the Candomblé, the traditional Afro-Brazilian religion of Bahia. Amado’s popularity as a writer never decreased. His books were translated into 49 languages in 55 countries, were adapted into films, theatrical works, and TV programs. They even inspired some samba schools of the Brazilian Carnival. In 1987, the House of Jorge Amado Foundation was created, in Salvador. It promotes the protection of Amado’s estate and the development of culture in Bahia. Amado died on August 6, 2001. His ashes were spread in the garden of his house four days later.
Americas Watch. El Salvador's Decade of Terror. New Haven. 1991. Yale University Press. 0300049390. 207 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration - Soldiers searching bus passengers Northern Highway, 1980, photographg by Susan Meiselas.

In 1980 Archbishop Oscar Amulfo Romero, El Salvador’s outspoken advocate for peace and social justice, was murdered. Almost ten years later, six Jesuit priests, who, like Romero, worked for peace in El Salvador, were gunned down in cold blood. These events bracketed a decade of enmity and civil war in El Salvador, where an armed insurgency has been attempting to overthrow the military-backed government. EL SALVADOR’S DECADE OF TERROR shows that although the Salvadoran government has repeatedly promised to make political, judicial, and economic reforms, and although the United States has provided billions of dollars in aid, El Salvador today is a country where political violence predominates, where civilians are terrorized, and where the rule of law remains a myth. This new book from Americas Watch shows that despite U.S. efforts ostensibly to promote human rights in El Salvador, conditions there remain deplorable. It also demonstrates that while the Bush administration continues the Reagan administration’s policy of backing El Salvador’s brutal military, the Cold War rationale for supporting the Salvadoran government and armed forces is as weak now as at the dawn of U.S. military involvement. Documenting a wide range of violations by all sides in the conflict, Americas Watch challenges the current administration’s view that the human rights situation in El Salvador has steadily improved, and calls for a thorough reevaluation of the role of the United States in El Salvador.

Americas Watch was established in 1981 to monitor and promote observance of internationally recognized human rights in Latin America and the Caribbean. It is a division of Human Rights Watch.
Americas Watch. Peru Under Fire: Human Rights Since the Return of Democracy. New Haven. 1992. Yale University Press. 0300052375. 169 pages. hardcover. Cover photograph by Marcelo Montecino.

Although Peru is once again officially a democracy, its human rights abuses have increased steadily over the past decade. The people of Peru are caught in a deadly crossfire between government forces and a brutal insurgent movement, chiefly Sendero Luminoso, as they battle for control of the country. More than half of Peru’s citizens now live under a sustained state of emergency: in effect governed by the military, they lack basic protections against arbitrary arrest, incarceration, or extra-judicial execution by the armed and police forces or the paramilitary groups that are tolerated. However, although Peru now has the highest rate of disappearances of any nation worldwide, serious public debate about human rights has declined in the face of mounting economic and political turmoil. In PERU UNDER FIRE, Americas Watch shows that the nation’s elected leadership, faced with an unparalleled economic crisis, has lacked the capacity or will to combat subversion with reforms that could reduce the economic, racial, cultural, and regional divisions feeding the insurgency. In addition, the government has not been able to curb the corruption and violence caused by the drug traffic that results from Peru’s production of coca leaf, the basis for cocaine. Americas Watch discusses in detail the United States’s proposal to send military advisers and aid to help the Peruvian military combat Sendero and curtail the narcotics trafficking. The book argues that a military response to these problems cannot substitute for a coherent regional political, military, and economic program, coordinated and supervised by the Peruvian government.

Americas Watch was established in 1981 to monitor and promote observance of internationally recognized human rights in Latin America and the Caribbean. It is a division of Human Rights Watch.
Americo De Almeida, Jose. Trash. London. 1978. Peter Owen. 0720605156. Translated from the Portuguese by R. L. Scott-Buccleuch. 160 pages. hardcover. Cover: Keith Cunningham

TRASH (A Bagaceira) is probably the most important novel in modern Brazilian literature. Its publication in 1928 sparked off a literary revolution whose effects are still felt today. José Américo de Almeida and the writers who followed him turned their backs on the traditional European models and developed an independent, indigenous Brazilian literature, celebrating the language, landscape and climate of the Brazilian countryside and at the same time exposing the poverty and misery of the inhabitants of Brazil’s north-east. Set on a sugar-cane plantation, TRASH is a tale of love and revenge. During one of the periodic droughts that lay waste to the highlands, Valentim, a ruined cattle rancher, and his daughter Soledade come down to seek shelter on the plantation. The owner, Dagoberto, despite his traditional lowlander’s antipathy to the highlander, gives them work. Soledade has a mesmerizing effect on Dagoberto’s son Lücio, but as their relationship develops it becomes clear that the protagonists are caught up in a drama that has its roots in the not so distant past. José America’s style is dense and evocative, combining lyrical descriptions of nature with the rough, colloquial idioms of. the workers on the plantation. Such is its richness and complexity that R. L Scott- Buccleuch’s translation is the first to appear in any language.

JOSE AMERICO DE ALMEIDA was born in 1887 and now lives in retirement in Joao Pessoa. His long life has been devoted almost entirely to public service and literature. His first novel A Bagacei’ra (Trash, 1928) enjoyed enormous success, but he continued his political career, supporting Getulio Vargas in the 1930 revolution in Brazil and subsequently holding such offices as Minister of Public Works and Ambassador to the Vatican. In 1937 he was a candidate for the Presidency of Brazil. He has served as senator and governor of the state of Paraiba. In 1966 he was elected to the Brazilian Academy of Letters. In addition to A Bagaceira José Américo has written two other novels, 0 Boquirao (1935) and Coiieiras (1936), and various volumes of memoirs, the most recent of which was published in 1976.
Amorim, Enrique. The Horse and His Shadow. New York. 1943. Scribners. Translated from the Spanish by Lt. Richard L. O'Connell & James Graham Lujan. 252 pages. hardcover.

This vivid, colorful, and realistic novel of the vast pampas of South America introduces to North American readers a novelist who is well known throughout his own continent, and whose works have been translated into French and German, but who, with this novel, makes his first appearance in English. The action of ‘The Horse and His Shadow’ takes place in Uruguay, and through the symbolic figure of the stallion, Don Juan, there are combined the two leading themes of the plot. One theme concerns the war of the Polish refugees struggling for existence in their new country against the feudalistic owners of the great ‘estancias’; the other is concerned with the lonely inarticulate girl ‘La Gaucha’ who works as a servant in the house of Nico Azara, owner of the stallion, and who remains after his tragic death to live on the remnant of the once great ‘estancia,’ and, with her child, watch the mares plowing the fields and the stallion’s colt trotting in the furrow after his mother. The strength of the novel lies not only in its absorbing story, but also in its complete realization of the picturesque and striking gaucho types. Not only are the gauchos themselves fully realized but also the aristocratic Azara family appears with almost photographic fidelity. ‘The Horse and His Shadow’ will introduce North American readers to a scene unfamiliar until now and filled with beauty and color. It is a book not only for any one who likes a good story but also for the increasing number of readers who find especial interest in books on South American themes.

Enrique Amorim (July 25, 1900 – July 28, 1960) was an Uruguayan novelist and writer, best known for his story Las quitanderas whose plot centres on rural prostitution; also known for his left-wing politics. Born in Salto, Uruguay, his parents were wealthy cattle ranchers. His father was from a Portuguese background, his mother Basque. Amorim travelled extensively in Europe and Latin America, developing acquaintanceships and friendships with many of the leading literary figures of his time. He eventually had a house built in Salto, designed by Le Corbusier. In the 1920s Amorim wrote for the Argentinian leftist magazine Los Pensadores and published with the press Claridad, both associated with the left-leaning Buenos Aires-based Boedo group. In 1947 Amorim officially joined the Communist Party of Uruguay. He was also responsible for the erection of a monument in Salto to commemorate Federico García Lorca, the poet and playwright killed by Francisco Franco's forces in the opening weeks of the Spanish Civil War. About the Translators - Translating, if it has to be combined with soldiering, is not for a man of a sedentary disposition. When Richard O’Connell first began collaborating with James Graham Lujan on ‘The Horse and His Shadow,’ he was Sergeant O’Connell. His translating had to be done on weekend leaves or else at camp late at night, sometimes by flashlight. Even a ninety days’ stretch at officers’ candidate school did not completely stop work on the book. He finished his task at a mountain training center as Lieutenant O’Connell of the field artillery. James Graham Luján is of Mexican and Scotch descent. His interest in translating is based on a wide acquaintance with Mexican and South American writers. In this field, he has worked with the Committee on Cultural Relations with Latin America, and in the theatre. Lt. O’Connell and Graham Lujan first collaborated on a translation of five plays by Spain’s great young playwright, Federico Garcia Lorca. Their book, ‘From Lorca’s Theatre,’ made a distinguished body of plays known to American readers. They have also worked together on stories and magazine articles, and have translated from the poetry of Leopoldo Marechal, Pablo Neruda, and Gabriela Mistral, among others.
Ampuero, Roberto. The Neruda Case: A Novel. New York. 2012. Riverhead Books. 9781594487439. Translated from the Spanish by Carolina De Robertis. 341 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Tal Goretsky.

At a party in 1970s Chile, Cayetano Brulé meets Pablo Neruda, the great poet and national hero, at the height of his fame. But the elderly poet is full of secrets - one is that he's dying, and he recruits Cayetano to help him resolve another. And so Cayetano takes on his first case as a private detective to solve Neruda's last great mystery; the young man must travel around the globe and through Neruda's life and past in search of answers. Neruda's hidden agenda is slowly revealed on Cayetano's worldwide whirlwind expedition, which ends back in Chile, where Pinochet's coup plays out against the final revelations of the journey. Set against the fraught politics of pre-Pinochet Chile, and perilous behind-the-wall East Berlin, The Neruda Case spans countries, cultures, and political movements. Roberto Ampuero's richly atmospheric novels starring the wonderfully rougish detective Cayetano Brulé are an international sensation but have never before been translated into English. Evocative, romantic, and full of intrigue, The Neruda Case is both an intimate glimpse into the life of Pablo Neruda as death approaches and a gripping political thriller that unfolds during the fiercely convulsive end of an era.

Roberto Ampuero (Valparaíso, Chile, 1953) is a Chilean author, columnist, and a university professor. His first novel ¿Quién mató a Kristián Kustermann? was published in 1993 and in it he introduced his private eye, Cayetano Brulé, winning the Revista del Libro prize of El Mercurio. Since then the detective has appeared in five novels. In addition he has published an autobiographical novel about his years in Cuba titled Nuestros Años Verde Olivo (1999) and the novels Los Amantes de Estocolmo (Book of the Year in Chile, 2003 and the bestseller of the year in Chile )) and Pasiones Griegas (chosen as the Best Spanish Novel in China, 2006). His novels have been published in Latin America and Spain, and have been translated into German, French, Italian, Chinese, Swedish, Portuguese, Greek, Croatian, and English. In Chile his works have sold more than 40 editions. Ampuero now resides in Iowa where he is a professor at the University of Iowa in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. He was a columnist of La Tercera and the New York Times Syndicate and since March 2009 has been working as a columnist for El Mercurio. Between 2013 and 2014 he was Minister of Culture in the Conservative government of Sebastián Piñera.
Amy, Francisco Javier (editor and translator). Musa bilingue; being a collection of translation, principally from the standard Anglo-American poets, into Spanish; and Spanish, Cuban and Porto Rican poets into English, with the original text opposite, and biographical notes; especially intended for the use of students. San Juan, Puerto Rico. 1903. Press of "El Boletin Mercantil,". Translated from the Spanish by Francisco Javier Amy, William Cullen Bryant, and L. E. Levy. 329 pages.

Poems by minor nineteenth-century poets. Of little interest today. Spanish Americans included are: Francisco Javier Amy (Puerto Rico), José Gautier Benitez (Puerto Rico), José Maria Heredia (Cuba), Rafael Maria de Mendive (Cuba), José Jacinto Milanés y Fuentes (Cuba), Francisco Sellén (Cuba), Juan Clemente Zenea (Cuba).

Andahazi, Federico. The Merciful Women. New York. 2000. Doubleday. 0385600534. Translated from the Spanish by Alberto Manguel. 188 pages. hardcover.

It is Switzerland, 1816. Percy Shelley and his wife Mary, and Byron's physician Dr Polidori are ensconced in the Villa Diodati. Polidori enters a Faustian pact with Annette Legrand, where she will produce a vampire tale for him. What can he, in return, offer this ghostly female predator?

Federico Andahazi (born June 6, 1963) is an Argentine writer. Federico Andahazi was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, at Congreso, a central neighborhood of the city. He is the son of Bela Andahazi, Hungarian poet and psychoanalyst, and Juana Merlín. He obtained a bachelor's degree in Psychology (University of Buenos Aires); he practiced psychoanalysis a few years, while he was working on his short stories. His books have been translated to many languages. In the United States, he has been published by Doubleday, in England by Transworld, in France by Laffont, in Italy by Frassinelli, in China by China Times, in Japan by Kadokawa, in Germany by Krüger, and by publishing houses in other countries. He gave lectures in the Faculty of Journalism and Communication Sciences of the University of Moscow, Russia, and the University of Santos Ossa of Antofagasta, Chile. He also gave talks in Stockholm, London, Paris, Istanbul and other cities of Europe, Latin America, and The United States. He had participated in literary congresses in France, Finland, and several cities in Spain among others. He was invited to book fairs in Guadalajara, Moscow, Pula, Istanbul, Madrid, Barcelona, and Buenos Aires and most cities of Argentina. He has written articles published by Clarín, La Nación, Perfil, Noticias, Veintitrés, Lamujerdemivida, Brando, V de Vian, and others in Argentina, USA, Portugal, Colombia. In 1996 he won the First Prize of the Segunda Bienal de Arte Joven de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires with his short story "Almas misericordiosas". The same year he received the First Prize of the Concurso Anual desde la Gente with his short story "El sueño de los justos". Towards the end of 1996, he was awarded the CAMED Prize for the short story Por Encargo. In 1996, while Andahazi was the finalist of the Planeta Awards, his novel The Anatomist won the First Prize of the Fundación Fortabat. However, the mentor and financial supporter of the contest, María Amalia Lacroze de Fortabat, announced her "disagreement" with the decision of the jury, through a request published in most newspapers of Buenos Aires, in which she stated that the novel "does not contribute to [the] exalt[ation of] the most high values of the human spirit". The Fundación respected and implemented the decision of the jury, which included María Angélica Bosco, Raúl Castagnino, José María Castiñeira de Dios, María Granata and Eduardo Gudiño Kieffer, but the jury was subsequently dismissed by Amalia Lacroze de Fortabat and the literary competitions organized by the Fundación Fortabat have not been held again. The Anatomist was published by Editorial Planeta in 1997, translated into over thirty languages, and has sold millions of copies worldwide. His second novel, The Merciful Women, was published in 1998. In 1998 the publishing house Temas published a small volume with some of the short stories awarded titled El árbol de las tentaciones. There are three short stories that begin in the same way and they are located in similar settings (nineteenth-century Argentina). In 2000 he published El príncipe and in 2002 El secreto de los flamencos. Errante en la sombra was published in 2004; Andahazi wrote more than forty tangos for this story, in which singer Carlos Gardel takes part. During the summer of 2005, Andahazi and his readers collectively wrote a newspaper serial called Mapas del fin del mundo published by the newspaper Diario Clarín. The author wrote the beginning of a text, giving the place to the readers to continue the story, creating characters, proposing plots, solving riddles, to be sent by e-mail. Therefore, in an unprecedented work, reading and answering thousands of e-mails per week, Andahazi built the story with the various inputs and points of view. Every Saturday a new chapter was added to the novel, increasing the participation and the expectation of readers converted into co-authors. The novel La ciudad de los herejes was also published in 2005. In 2006, Federico Andahazi won the Planeta Prize with his novel El conquistador. He participated in numerous anthologies, among which are: Las palabras pueden: Los escritores y la infancia (2007, to UNICEF and World Food Program) with authors like José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Ernesto Sábato, Juan Gelman, Mario Benedetti and Mario Vargas Llosa. Líneas aéreas (1999, published by Lengua de trapo, Spain) with writers such as Jorge Volpi, Santiago Gamboa and Edmundo Paz Soldán. A Whistler in the nightworld, short fiction from the Latin Americas (2002, published by Plume, USA) Laura Restrepo and Ángeles Mastretta among others. La Selección Argentina (2000, published by Tusquets). El libro de los nuevos pecados capitales (2001, Norma Publishing Group). He also participated in the book Homage to Diego Maradona (2001, SAF) in the company of Roberto Fontanarrosa and Pacho O'Donnell.
Anderson-Imbert, Enrique. Cage With Only One Side. Reno. 1974. West Coast Poetry Review. Translated from the Spanish by Isabel Reade. unpaginated. paperback.

This present selection is from The Cheshire Cat, not yet published as a whole. Enrique Anderson Imbert was born in Argentina in 1910. At 21 he became editor of the literary section of La Vanguardia, in Buenos Aires. After leaving school for a few years to be a Socialist revolutionary, he earned his Ph.D. at the Universidad National de Buenos Aires in 1946. He had been teaching literature at Argentinian universities since 1940, but in 1947 was brought to the University of Michigan after being threatened by the Peron government. He is now at Harvard, in a named professorship created specifically for him. One of the top critics and historians of Hispanic literature, he has a vast scholarly bibliography, but his real love is his fiction. In Spanish he has published two novels and four collections of short stories (among his total of 27 books), but only two of these - FUGUE and THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MIRROR - have appeared in English. So although he has been called one of the three best writers in Argentina, his fiction is virtually unknown in this country. Despite his firm Socialist convictions, Anderson is an elitist writer. He assumes considerable knowledge on the part of the reader, playing with philosophical ideas, myths, religious concepts, history, contemporary society: anything at all is apt to be turned upside down or inside out in Anderson’s fiction. He is a careful stylist, with a genius for metaphor.

Enrique Anderson-Imbert (February 12, 1910– December 6, 2000) was an Argentine novelist, short-story writer and literary critic. Born in Córdoba, Argentina, Anderson-Imbert graduated from the University of Buenos Aires. From 1940 until 1947 he taught at the University of Tucumán. In 1947, he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1954. He became the first Victor S. Thomas Professor of Hispanic Literature at Harvard University in 1965. Anderson-Imbert remained at Harvard until his retirement in 1980. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1967. Anderson-Imbert is best known for his brief ‘microcuentos’ in which he blends fantasy and magical realism. His story ‘Sala de espera’ is taken from The Cheshire Cat, written in 1965; he is also the author of the 1966 short story entitled ‘Taboo.’ He also penned the famous short stories ‘El Leve Pedro’, ‘El Fantasma’, and ‘Vudu’. He died on December 6, 2000 in Buenos Aires. Isabel Reade, who has taught Spanish languages and literature on all undergraduate levels in college, was a graduate student of Anderson’s at the University of Michigan. She translated his El grimorio, published with the English title THE OTHER SIDE OF THE MIRROR. Southern Illinois University Press, 1966).
Anderson-Imbert, Enrique. Fugue. Lawrence. 1967. Coronado Press. Translated from the Spanish by Esther Whitmarsh Phillips. 148 pages. paperback.

Fiction from the noted Argentinian novelist. Anderson-Imbert is best known for his brief "microcuentos" in which he blends fantasy and magical realism. His story "Sala de espera" is taken from The Cheshire Cat, written in 1965; he is also the author of the 1966 short story entitled "Taboo." He also penned the short stories "El Leve Pedro", "El Fantasma", and "Vudu".

Enrique Anderson-Imbert (February 12, 1910– December 6, 2000) was an Argentine novelist, short-story writer and literary critic. Born in Córdoba, Argentina, Anderson-Imbert graduated from the University of Buenos Aires. From 1940 until 1947 he taught at the University of Tucumán. In 1947, he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1954. He became the first Victor S. Thomas Professor of Hispanic Literature at Harvard University in 1965. Anderson-Imbert remained at Harvard until his retirement in 1980. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1967. He died on December 6, 2000 in Buenos Aires.
Anderson-Imbert, Enrique. Spanish-American Literature: A History. Detroit. 1963. Wayne State University Press. Translated from the Spanish by John V. Falconieri. 617 pages. hardcover. Designed by Richard Kinney

This book is both history and literature. Unlike other histories of literature, it is not simply an historical synthesis of names, titles, and dates; it is, in addition, a critical, analytical appraisal of the verse, prose, and drama written in Spanish in the Americas from the time of the Conquistadors up to the present. Not only is this history the most complete and up-to-date account of Spanish-American literature available, but it is discriminating as well, distinguishing between major and minor authors and works. Although chronicles abound, as do interpretations of specific great works, only here is there history and literature. Originally published in Spanish in three editions, this work was recognized as a significant contribution to the intellectual and cultural life of North America. Consequently, the Rockefeller Foundation, as part of its Latin-American Translation Program, provided funds so that this worthwhile book could be translated and made available to an English-speaking public.

Enrique Anderson-Imbert (February 12, 1910– December 6, 2000) was an Argentine novelist, short-story writer and literary critic. Born in Córdoba, Argentina, Anderson-Imbert graduated from the University of Buenos Aires. From 1940 until 1947 he taught at the University of Tucumán. In 1947, he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1954. He became the first Victor S. Thomas Professor of Hispanic Literature at Harvard University in 1965. Anderson-Imbert remained at Harvard until his retirement in 1980. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1967. Anderson-Imbert is best known for his brief ‘microcuentos’ in which he blends fantasy and magical realism. His story ‘Sala de espera’ is taken from The Cheshire Cat, written in 1965; he is also the author of the 1966 short story entitled ‘Taboo.’ He also penned the famous short stories ‘El Leve Pedro’, ‘El Fantasma’, and ‘Vudu’. He died on December 6, 2000 in Buenos Aires.
Anderson-Imbert, Enrique. The Other Side of the Mirror. Carbondale. 1966. Southern Illinois University Press. Translated from the Spanish by Isabel Reade. 226 pages. hardcover. Designed by Andor Braun

Although Enrique Anderson Imbert is little known in this country, he is recognized in Latin America as a writer of great talent. This collection of short stories, translated from his El grimorio, is a blend of the fantastic and the real. The opening story’s main character becomes more and more buoyant until one morning he floats away; in another story a man is dissolved by the air. One finds that reality is only apparent reality. The stories that seem most real have surprise endings which bring the reader up short and make him rearrange his whole concept of the story’s situation. The author enjoys the idea that things could different from what they are, and he tries to duplicate that enjoyment by writing stories dedicated to readers who appreciate the possible more than the real. A story may begin with a perfectly realistic situation only to come to an utterly fantastic conclusion; the supernatural is accepted matter-of-factly into the natural world. Isabel Reade, who worked closely with Anderson on these translations, points out that irony is another principal characteristic of his stories. ‘The monk who longed for sanctity as union with God finds that it is precisely his sanctity that has separated him from God (‘A Saint in the New World’); a man’s desperate attempt to kill himself succeed only in killing other people (‘The Suicide’); the noisy celebration of the birth of a prince causes the infant’s death (‘The Prince’). Anderson’s sense of beauty as well as his lively imagination are apparent in ‘Ash Moon’, a story of Buenos Aires blanketed by volcanic ash which is likened to soft snow, and in his description of a dream valley in ‘Patrick O’Hara, the Liberator’. The great majority of translations from Latin American literature are of realistic novels. Here we have a collection of the opposite. Isabel Reade has translated this book to share the imaginative stories, the often nonrealistic, philosophical, or poetic stories with all readers, but they are of special consequence to aficionados of Latin American writing and to persons interested in experiments with techniques and themes in literature. This collection of short stories is translated from El grimorio.

Enrique Anderson-Imbert (February 12, 1910– December 6, 2000) was an Argentine novelist, short-story writer and literary critic. Born in Córdoba, Argentina, Anderson-Imbert graduated from the University of Buenos Aires. From 1940 until 1947 he taught at the University of Tucumán. In 1947, he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1954. He became the first Victor S. Thomas Professor of Hispanic Literature at Harvard University in 1965. Anderson-Imbert remained at Harvard until his retirement in 1980. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1967. Anderson-Imbert is best known for his brief ‘microcuentos’ in which he blends fantasy and magical realism. His story ‘Sala de espera’ is taken from The Cheshire Cat, written in 1965; he is also the author of the 1966 short story entitled ‘Taboo.’ He also penned the famous short stories ‘El Leve Pedro’, ‘El Fantasma’, and ‘Vudu’. He died on December 6, 2000 in Buenos Aires.
Anderson-Imbert, Enrique. Woven On the Loom of Time. Austin. 1990. University Of Texas Press. 0292790546. Translated from the Spanish & Selected by Carleton Vail & Pamela Edwards-Mondragon. Introduction by Ester de Izaguirre. Texas Pan American Series. 180 pages. hardcover.

Argentinian scholar and writer Enrique Anderson-Imbert is familiar to many North American students for his La Literatura de America Latina I and II, which are widely used in college Spanish courses. But Anderson-Imbert is also a noted creative writer, whose use of ‘magical realism’ helped pave the way for such writers as Borges, Cortázar, Sábato, and Ocampo. In this anthology, Carleton Vail and Pamela Edwards-Mondragon have chosen stories from the period 1965 to 1985 to introduce English-speaking readers to the creative work of Enrique Anderson-Imbert. Representative stories from the collections The Cheshire Cat, The Swindler Retires, Madness Plays at Chess, Klein’s Bottle, Two Women and One Julián, and The Size of the Witches illustrate Anderson-Imbert’s unique style and world view. Many are ‘short short’ stories, which Anderson-Imbert calls casos (instances). The range of subjects and points of view varies widely, challenging such ‘realities’ as time and space, right and wrong, science and religion. In a prologue, Anderson-Imbert tells an imaginary reader, ‘Each one of my stories is a closed entity, brief because it has caught a single spasm of life in a single leap of fantasy. Only a reading of all my stories will reveal my world-view.’ The reader asks, ‘And are you sure that it is worth the trouble?’ Anderson-Imbert replies, ‘No.’ The unexpected, ironic ending is one of the great pleasures of reading Enrique Anderson-Imbert.

Enrique Anderson-Imbert (February 12, 1910– December 6, 2000) was an Argentine novelist, short-story writer and literary critic. Born in Córdoba, Argentina, Anderson-Imbert graduated from the University of Buenos Aires. From 1940 until 1947 he taught at the University of Tucumán. In 1947, he joined the faculty of the University of Michigan. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1954. He became the first Victor S. Thomas Professor of Hispanic Literature at Harvard University in 1965. Anderson-Imbert remained at Harvard until his retirement in 1980. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1967. Anderson-Imbert is best known for his brief ‘microcuentos’ in which he blends fantasy and magical realism. His story ‘Sala de espera’ is taken from The Cheshire Cat, written in 1965; he is also the author of the 1966 short story entitled ‘Taboo.’ He also penned the famous short stories ‘El Leve Pedro’, ‘El Fantasma’, and ‘Vudu’. He died on December 6, 2000 in Buenos Aires. Carleton Vail is an independent scholar and translator. Pamela Edwards-Mondragon is head of the English and Spanish departments at Converse International School of Languages in San Diego, California.
Anderson, Jon Lee. Che Guevara: A Revolutionary Life. New York. 1997. Grove Press. 0802116000. 814 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by John Gall Jacket illustration by Paul Davis. Author photograph by J. B. Russell

CHE GUEVARA: A REVOLUTIONARY LIFE is the first definitive and most extensively researched biography of one of the most fascinating, controversial, and charismatic figures of the twentieth century. After World War II, as the postcolonial world exploded in independence movements and armed insurrections, there emerged a handsome, dashing champion of the poor and dispossessed, an Argentine doctor named Che Guevara. Che’s dream was an epic one: to unite Latin America and the rest of the developing world through armed revolution and to end once and for all the poverty and injustice he saw there. Anderson’s biography traces Che’s life and death from the revolutionary capitals of Havana and Algiers to the battlegrounds of Bolivia and the Congo, from the halls of power in Moscow and Washington to the exile havens of Miami, Mexico, and Guatemala, revealing Che’s crucial role in an era of tumultuous change. Jon Lee Anderson, working over the last five years, has had unprecedented access to Che’s personal archives through the cooperation of his widow, obtaining previously unpublished diaries and other important documents. He also gained access to Cuban government archives formerly sealed to outsiders and interviewed scores of Che’s closest friends and comrades, some of whom are speaking here for the first time. In Moscow, Anderson met with former KGB officials who worked with Che; in Havana, Cuban spymaster Manuel Piñeiro, mastermind of Cuba’s guerrilla programs, spoke for the first time ever; in Bolivia and in Miami, Anderson unearthed secrets from the guerrillas who fought with Che and from the CIA men and army officers who hunted him down. Until now, many of the true facts of Che Guevaras remarkable life and mysterious death have remained unknown, cloaked in secrecy and intrigue. Che Guevara illuminates as never before the mythic Che-a figure of charisma and idealism who represented the high-water mark of revolutionary communism as a force in history.

JON LEE ANDERSON (born January 15, 1957) began working as a reporter in 1979 for the Lima Times in Peru. Throughout much of the 1980s, he covered Central America’s political conflicts, first for syndicated columnist Jack Anderson and later for Time magazine. He has also written for Harper’s, Life, and the Nation, among other journals. He is the author of GUERRILLAS and has coauthored two nonfiction books with his brother, Scott Anderson. He lives in Spain with his wife and three children.
Anderson, Thomas F. Carnival and National Identity in the Poetry of Afrocubanismo. Gainesville. 2017. University Press of Florida. 9780813054728. 39 b&/w illustrations. 358 pages. paperback.

The poetry associated with Afrocubanismo has been of great interest to academics since the movement began in the late 1920s. Thomas Anderson’s detailed analysis infuses new life into the study of these remarkable works. Focusing on the representations of carnival and its comparsas (carnival bands and music), Carnival and National Identity in the Poetry of Afrocubanismo offers thought-provoking new readings of poems by seminal Cuban poets, demonstrating how their writings on and about these traditions both contributed to and detracted from the development of a recognizable Afro-Cuban identity. This volume is the first to examine, from a literary perspective, the long-running debate between the proponents of Afro-Cuban cultural manifestations and the predominantly white Cuban intelligentsia who viewed these traditions as 'backward' and counter to the interests of the young Republic. Including analyses of the work of Felipe Pichardo Moya, Alejo Carpentier, Nicolás Guillén, Emilio Ballagas, José Zacarías Tallet, Felix B. Caignet, Marcelino Arozarena, and Alfonso Camín, this rigorous, interdisciplinary volume offers a fresh look at the canon of Afrocubanismo and offers surprising insights into Cuban culture during the early years of the Republic.

Thomas F. Anderson is associate professor of Latin American literature at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of Everything in Its Place: The Life and Works of Virgilio Piñera.
Andrade, Carlos Drummond de and Alberti, Rafael. Looking For Poetry: Songs From the Quechua. New York. 2002. Knopf. 0375709886. Translated by Mark Strand. Paperback Original. 175 pages. paperback. Cover: Abby Weintraub

SONGS FROM THE QUECHUA are translated from Spanish versions of the folk poetry of the Quechua Indians of South America, collected and transcribed in the nineteenth century by priests and, more recently, by anthropologists. Through their directness and simplicity, they convey a degree of tenderness that is unusual in any poetry. . CARLOS DRUMMOND DE ANDRADE, one of the most revered Brazilian poets of the twentieth century, was born in 1902 in a small mining town; he died in Rio de Janeiro in 1987. His poems are, for the most part, bittersweet evocations of a small-town childhood, or, more emblematically, remorseful accounts of a lost world or simply discreet and sometimes ironic views of the way things are. His intelligence, his humor, and his gift for narrative give his poems a deep and resonant charm.

RAFAEL ALBERTI was born in 1902 in Spain and was in exile in Argentina during the Spanish Civil War. He moved to Italy in 1964 and from there he returned to Spain. He died in 1999. Astonishingly inventive, he is among the most effortless of poets. These fifty poems-elegies, remembrances, and poems of loss and exile-provide an ample introduction to one of the twentieth century’s great poets. MARK STRAND is the author of nine books of poems, INCLUDING BLIZZARD OF ONE, which was awarded the 1999 Pulitzer Prize, and the translator of several volumes of poems. He currently teaches at the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago.
Andrade, Carlos Drummond De. In the Middle of the Road: Selected Poems. Tucson. 1965. University Of Arizona Press. Compiled, Edited & Translated from the Portuguese by John Nist. Bilingual. 123 pages. hardcover. Cover: Gary Gore

Humor, sadness, lyricism, and strength are effectively, even compellingly combined in this book of 63 poems in both Portuguese and English, introducing a great Brazilian contemporary to the English-speaking world. At times meditatively gentle, at other times applying the knife-edge of irony, the poet always evidences concern, not only for his compatriots, bit for the entire human condition. Whether he is writing of the ox, the elephant, the wrestler, love, chastity, or science fiction, Carlos Drummond de Andrade avoid cliché and applies fresh realism to profound social awareness as in the long poem, ‘Charlie Chaplin’, where he speaks of the lives of the poor. ‘There are not many dinners in the world . . . the best chickens are protected by thick glass over china platters, And there are entire armies protecting that chicken, And there is a hunger that comes from Canada, a wind, a glacial voice, a breath of winter.’

CARLOS DRUMMOND DE ANDRADE, born in Itabira in 1902, is recognized as the founder of literary Brazilian Modernism. His ancestry combines Scottish and Latin American strains, and many readers find traits of both cultures in his work. A retired Minister of Education, he is known for his friendship and encouragement of many of Brazil’s younger writers and artist. JOHN NIST, who complied and translated these poems, collected the poetry of modern Brazil for an anthology published in 1962 at Indiana University Press, and widely acclaimed both here and abroad. A poet and novelist in his own right, Professor Nist has had several books published in Brazil and holds the Machado de Assis medal from the Brazilian Academy of Letters and Arts. At the time of this publication he is the chairman of the English Department at Austin College, Sherman, Texas.
Andrade, Carlos Drummond De. The Minus Sign: Selected Poems. Redding Ridge. 1980. Black Swan Books. 0933806035. Translated from the Portuguese by Virginia De Araujo. 170 pages. hardcover.

‘A poet, a poet like Carlos Drummond, works out his relationships with the world, the other, and with himself, through poems. His writing, hour by hour and over the years, is a deliberate process by which he arrives at decisions. As in the spiritual purification of a religious novice, the perfect state is realized through a gradual elimination of needs that are one after another recognized as illusory so purification in other areas-in writing, for example, or in loving-can come about by steadily reducing the margin of error, the areas in which errors can be made. However, in the case of an individual who, unlike the religious novice, has no community on whom he can call for correction and reassurance, the process of such purification will be lonely and protracted. There comes a time, Drummond says, ‘to know that some errors fall, but the stalk of life grows stronger.’ The emphasis lies on life, on resiliency. A perfect death is not the end in view; life is.’ - from the Introduction. Selected and translated by Virginia de Araiijo, this collection of poems presents a spectrum of the prolific creativity of Carlos Drummond de Andrade, Brazil’s finest living poet, long a proponent of modernist literature and several times suggested for the Nobel Prize. ‘This is translation all the way -not of Portuguese words into English words, but of one whole culture (Brazilian) into another (North American). The essential and precious foreign-ness of the Brazilian sensibility is scrupulously preserved; and yet, uncannily, we experience these poems as if we read them in the language in which they were originally composed.’ - DONALD DAVIE.

Carlos Drummond de Andrade (October 31, 1902 – August 17, 1987) was perhaps the most influential Brazilian poet of the 20th century. He has become something of a national poet; his poem ‘Canção Amiga’ (‘Friendly Song’) was printed on the 50 cruzados bill. He is considered to be among the greatest Brazilian poets of all time. Drummond was born in Itabira, a mining village in Minas Gerais in southeastern Brazil. His parents were farmers belonging to old Brazilian families of mainly Portuguese origin. He went to a school of pharmacy in Belo Horizonte, but never worked as a pharmacist after graduation. He worked in government service for most of his life, eventually becoming director of history for the National Historical and Artistic Heritage Service of Brazil. Though his earliest poems are formal and satirical, Drummond quickly adopted the new forms of Brazilian modernism that were evolving in the 1920s, incited by the work of Mário de Andrade (to whom he was not related). He would mingle speech fluent in elegance and truth about the surrounding, many times quotidian, world, with a fluidity of thought. Drummond's popularity has been credited because a great part of his poetry (especially after lyrical maturity) has acquired an impressive capacity for the translation of ideas, transforming his particular troubles into a tool for universal communication. One of Drummond's best-known poems is his hymn to an ordinary man, ‘José.’ It is a poem of desolation The work of Carlos Drummond is generally divided into several segments, which appear very markedly in each of his books. But this is somewhat misleading, since even in the midst of his everyday poems or his socialist, politicized poems, there appear creations which can be easily incorporated into his later metaphysical canon, and none of these styles is completely free of the others. There is surely much metaphysical content in even his most political poems. The most prominent of these later metaphysical poems is A Máquina do Mundo (The World's Machine). The poem deals with an anti-Faust referred to in the first person, who receives the visit of the aforementioned Machine, which stands for all possible knowledge, and the sum of the answers for all the questions which afflict men; in highly dramatic and baroque versification the poem develops only for the anonymous subject to decline the offer of endless knowledge and proceed his gloomy path in the solitary road. It takes the renaissance allegory of the Machine of the World from Portugal's most esteemed poet, Luís de Camões, more precisely, from a canto at the end of his epic masterpiece Os Lusíadas. One of those said segments have been found only after his death: deliberately erotic poetry. Drummond is a favorite of American poets, a number of whom, including Mark Strand and Lloyd Schwartz, have translated him. Later writers and critics have sometimes credited his relationship with Elizabeth Bishop, his first English language translator, as influential for his American reception, but though she admired him Bishop claimed she barely knew him. In an interview with George Starbuck in 1977, she said, ‘I didn't know him at all. He's supposed to be very shy. I'm supposed to be very shy. We've met once — on the sidewalk at night. We had just come out of the same restaurant, and he kissed my hand politely when we were introduced.’ Drummond, as a modernist, follows the style proposed by Mário and Oswald de Andrade; making use of free verse, and not depending on a fixed meter. If modernism was to be divided into lyrical and subjective or objective and concrete, Drummond would be part of the latter, similar to Oswald de Andrade. Drummond was the first great poet to assert himself after the premiere modernist of Brazil and created a unique style dominated by his beautiful writing. His work displays linguistic freedom and free verse. But it goes beyond that: ‘The work of Drummond reaches – as Fernando Pessoa and Jorge de Lima and Murilo Mendes Herberto Helder – a coefficient of loneliness that detached from the soil of history, leading the reader to an attitude free of references, trademarks or ideological or prospective, ‘said Alfredo Bosi (1994).
Andrade, Carlos Drummond De. Travelling in the Family: Selected Poems. New York. 1986. Random House. 0394747518. Edited by Thomas Colchie & Mark Strand W/Additional Translations by Elizabeth Bishop & Gregory Rabassa. 137 pages. paperback. Cover design: Susan Shapiro Cover painting: 'Fusileiro and Family' by Alberto da Veiga Guignard Colledion of Dr. Aloysio de Paulo

This, the first full-scale presentation in English of his work, spans his career as a poet while concentrating on his most fruitful period-the 1930s and 1940s. Many of these poems, which helped to define the tenor of modernism in Brazil and elsewhere in Latin America, are already familiar to poetry lovers through Elizabeth Bishop’s and Mark Strand’s now classic translations. They appear in this book, together with other translations by Thomas Colchie and Gregory Rabassa. Colchie has also contributed an introduction evaluating Drummond’s place in modern Brazilian literature.

CARLOS DRUMMOND DE ANDRADE is universally recognized as the most important living Brazilian writer and the most important poet alive today who writes in Portuguese.
Andrade, Mario De. Fraulein. New York. 1933. Macaulay Company. 252 pages. hardcover.

From the publisher’s preface: ‘Anyone meeting Fraulein Elsa Schumann in the streets of the foreign city where she had found a refuge, would have been impressed by her sensitive, beautiful, and intelligent face. It would have been impossible to guess that in the household where she served as governess her chief duty was not to teach the languages and accomplishments she knew, but to initiate the eldest son into the mysteries of love. That was her strange profession, to prepare wealthy young men for their love life and to save them from the physical and spiritual perils of the underworld. How she entered this profession, what the teaching of love did to her own love life, how it affected her career, makes a story as heart-stirring as it is unusual.’

Mário Raul de Morais Andrade (October 9, 1893 – February 25, 1945) was a Brazilian poet, novelist, musicologist, art historian and critic, and photographer. One of the founders of Brazilian modernism, he virtually created modern Brazilian poetry with the publication of his Paulicéia Desvairada (Hallucinated City) in 1922. He has had an enormous influence on modern Brazilian literature, and as a scholar and essayist—he was a pioneer of the field of ethnomusicology—his influence has reached far beyond Brazil. Andrade was the central figure in the avant-garde movement of São Paulo for twenty years. Trained as a musician and best known as a poet and novelist, Andrade was personally involved in virtually every discipline that was connected with São Paulo modernism, and became Brazil's national polymath. His photography and essays on a wide variety of subjects, from history to literature and music, were widely published. He was the driving force behind the Week of Modern Art, the 1922 event that reshaped both literature and the visual arts in Brazil, and a member of the avant-garde ‘Group of Five.’ The ideas behind the Week were further explored in the preface to his poetry collection Pauliceia Desvairada, and in the poems themselves. After working as a music professor and newspaper columnist he published his great novel, Macunaíma, in 1928. Work on Brazilian folk music, poetry, and other concerns followed unevenly, often interrupted by Andrade's shifting relationship with the Brazilian government. At the end of his life, he became the founding director of São Paulo's Department of Culture, formalizing a role he had long held as the catalyst of the city's—and the nation's—entry into artistic modernity.
Andrade, Mario De. Hallucinated City. Nashville. 1968. Vanderbilt University Press. Translated from the Brazilian by Jack E. Tomlins. Bilingual. 100 pages. hardcover.

The Week of Modern Art, the celebrated gathering of musicians, artists, and writer which took place in Sao Paulo in February 1922, heralded the beginning of the Brazilian Modernist Movement - Brazil’s most significant literary event of this century. Mario de Andrade’s HALLUCINATED CITY was the first book to come out of the movement - a milestone in Brazilian intelectual history and literature. After the appearance of his book of poems, with its ‘Extremely Interesting Preface’. Andrade was variously hailed as prophet, pope, and lawgiver of the movement. Andrade had crammed into his poems all that was vividly Brazil and specifically all that was Sao Paulo. The immediate influence on other Brazilian poets of the twenties was salutary. His poetry squelched their slavish imitation of then current European literary schools. It freed them from the shackles of meter and rhyme and the strictures of a formal Portuguese grammar. It brought them back to Brazilian themes and lively, idiomatic language. Professor Tomlins has provided what Raymond S. Sayers calls ‘a splendid translation of a very important book’ for students of Brazilian literary history and for poetry-lovers alike. . JACK E. TOMLINS is Associate Professor of Portuguese at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque (his alma mater for both the B.A. and the master’s degree). He earned his doctorate at Princeton University (1957) and taught at Princeton, Wake Forest College, Rutgers University, and Chatham College before returning to New Mexico in 1967. (original title: Paulicea Desvairada, 1922 - Livaria Martins Editora of Sao Paulo, Brazil).

Mário Raul de Morais Andrade (October 9, 1893 – February 25, 1945) was a Brazilian poet, novelist, musicologist, art historian and critic, and photographer. One of the founders of Brazilian modernism, he virtually created modern Brazilian poetry with the publication of his Paulicéia Desvairada (Hallucinated City) in 1922. He has had an enormous influence on modern Brazilian literature, and as a scholar and essayist—he was a pioneer of the field of ethnomusicology—his influence has reached far beyond Brazil. Andrade was the central figure in the avant-garde movement of São Paulo for twenty years. Trained as a musician and best known as a poet and novelist, Andrade was personally involved in virtually every discipline that was connected with São Paulo modernism, and became Brazil's national polymath. His photography and essays on a wide variety of subjects, from history to literature and music, were widely published. He was the driving force behind the Week of Modern Art, the 1922 event that reshaped both literature and the visual arts in Brazil, and a member of the avant-garde ‘Group of Five.’ The ideas behind the Week were further explored in the preface to his poetry collection Pauliceia Desvairada, and in the poems themselves. After working as a music professor and newspaper columnist he published his great novel, Macunaíma, in 1928. Work on Brazilian folk music, poetry, and other concerns followed unevenly, often interrupted by Andrade's shifting relationship with the Brazilian government. At the end of his life, he became the founding director of São Paulo's Department of Culture, formalizing a role he had long held as the catalyst of the city's—and the nation's—entry into artistic modernity.
Andrade, Mario De. Hallucinated City. Nashville. 1968. Vanderbilt University Press. Translated from the Brazilian by Jack E. Tomlins. Bilingual. 100 pages. hardcover.

The Week of Modern Art, the celebrated gathering of musicians, artists, and writer which took place in Sao Paulo in February 1922, heralded the beginning of the Brazilian Modernist Movement - Brazil’s most significant literary event of this century. Mario de Andrade’s HALLUCINATED CITY was the first book to come out of the movement - a milestone in Brazilian intelectual history and literature. After the appearance of his book of poems, with its ‘Extremely Interesting Preface’. Andrade was variously hailed as prophet, pope, and lawgiver of the movement. Andrade had crammed into his poems all that was vividly Brazil and specifically all that was Sao Paulo. The immediate influence on other Brazilian poets of the twenties was salutary. His poetry squelched their slavish imitation of then current European literary schools. It freed them from the shackles of meter and rhyme and the strictures of a formal Portuguese grammar. It brought them back to Brazilian themes and lively, idiomatic language. Professor Tomlins has provided what Raymond S. Sayers calls ‘a splendid translation of a very important book’ for students of Brazilian literary history and for poetry-lovers alike.

Mário Raul de Morais Andrade (October 9, 1893 – February 25, 1945) was a Brazilian poet, novelist, musicologist, art historian and critic, and photographer. One of the founders of Brazilian modernism, he virtually created modern Brazilian poetry with the publication of his Paulicéia Desvairada (Hallucinated City) in 1922. He has had an enormous influence on modern Brazilian literature, and as a scholar and essayist—he was a pioneer of the field of ethnomusicology—his influence has reached far beyond Brazil. Andrade was the central figure in the avant-garde movement of São Paulo for twenty years. Trained as a musician and best known as a poet and novelist, Andrade was personally involved in virtually every discipline that was connected with São Paulo modernism, and became Brazil's national polymath. His photography and essays on a wide variety of subjects, from history to literature and music, were widely published. He was the driving force behind the Week of Modern Art, the 1922 event that reshaped both literature and the visual arts in Brazil, and a member of the avant-garde ‘Group of Five.’ The ideas behind the Week were further explored in the preface to his poetry collection Pauliceia Desvairada, and in the poems themselves. After working as a music professor and newspaper columnist he published his great novel, Macunaíma, in 1928. Work on Brazilian folk music, poetry, and other concerns followed unevenly, often interrupted by Andrade's shifting relationship with the Brazilian government. At the end of his life, he became the founding director of São Paulo's Department of Culture, formalizing a role he had long held as the catalyst of the city's—and the nation's—entry into artistic modernity.
Andrade, Mario De. Macunaima. New York. 1984. Random House. 0394534123. Translated from the Portuguese by E. A. Goodland. 169 pages. hardcover. Jacket art: Rita Loureiro

Announcing a major literary event: here is the first translation into English of a landmark precursor of Latin American magical realism, which has informed the work of contemporary writers from Garcia Marquez to Salman Rushdie. MACUNAIMA, first published in Portuguese in 1928, and one of the masterworks of Brazilian literature, is a comic folkloric rhapsody (call it a novel if you really want) about the adventures of a popular hero whose fate is intended to define the national character of Brazil. ‘Inventive, blessedly unsentimental,’ as Kirkus Reviews has it, and incorporating and interpreting the rich exotic myths and legends of Brazil, Macunaima traces the hero’s quest for a magic charm, a gift from the gods, that he lost by transgressing the mores of his culture. Born in the heart of the darkness of the jungle, Macunaima is a complex of contradictory traits (he is, of course, ‘a hero without a character’), and can at will magically change his age, his race, his geographic location, to suit his purposes and overcome obstacles. Dramatizing aspects of Brazil in transition (multiracial, Indian versus European, rural versus urban life), Macunaima undergoes sometimes hilarious, sometimes grotesque transformations until his final annihilation and apotheosis as the Great Bear constellation in the heavens. . One of the founders of the Modernist Movement of Brazil, MARIO DE ANDRADE was born in São Paulo in 1893. He studied at the Conservatory of Music and Drama, but his scholarly training also extended to anthropology and folklore. He wrote what is still regarded as some of the most important work in twentieth-century Brazilian poetry, and copious literary music and art criticism. He is similar to Cocteau in the force and versatility of his artistic character, but closer to Breton in the critical impact that his work had on the avant-garde in the post - World War I period of Brazilian letters. Mario de Andrade died in 1945. . (original title: Macunaima, o, Heroi sem nenhum carater, 1928 - Livaria Martins Editora of Sao Paulo, Brazil).

Mário Raul de Morais Andrade (October 9, 1893 – February 25, 1945) was a Brazilian poet, novelist, musicologist, art historian and critic, and photographer. One of the founders of Brazilian modernism, he virtually created modern Brazilian poetry with the publication of his Paulicéia Desvairada (Hallucinated City) in 1922. He has had an enormous influence on modern Brazilian literature, and as a scholar and essayist—he was a pioneer of the field of ethnomusicology—his influence has reached far beyond Brazil. Andrade was the central figure in the avant-garde movement of São Paulo for twenty years. Trained as a musician and best known as a poet and novelist, Andrade was personally involved in virtually every discipline that was connected with São Paulo modernism, and became Brazil's national polymath. His photography and essays on a wide variety of subjects, from history to literature and music, were widely published. He was the driving force behind the Week of Modern Art, the 1922 event that reshaped both literature and the visual arts in Brazil, and a member of the avant-garde ‘Group of Five.’ The ideas behind the Week were further explored in the preface to his poetry collection Pauliceia Desvairada, and in the poems themselves. After working as a music professor and newspaper columnist he published his great novel, Macunaíma, in 1928. Work on Brazilian folk music, poetry, and other concerns followed unevenly, often interrupted by Andrade's shifting relationship with the Brazilian government. At the end of his life, he became the founding director of São Paulo's Department of Culture, formalizing a role he had long held as the catalyst of the city's—and the nation's—entry into artistic modernity.
Andrade, Mario De. Macunaima. New York. 1984. Random House. 0394534123. Translated from the Portuguese by E. A. Goodland. 169 pages. hardcover. Jacket art: Rita Loureiro

Announcing a major literary event: here is the first translation into English of a landmark precursor of Latin American magical realism, which has informed the work of contemporary writers from Garcia Marquez to Salman Rushdie. MACUNAIMA, first published in Portuguese in 1928, and one of the masterworks of Brazilian literature, is a comic folkloric rhapsody (call it a novel if you really want) about the adventures of a popular hero whose fate is intended to define the national character of Brazil. ‘Inventive, blessedly unsentimental,’ as Kirkus Reviews has it, and incorporating and interpreting the rich exotic myths and legends of Brazil, Macunaima traces the hero’s quest for a magic charm, a gift from the gods, that he lost by transgressing the mores of his culture. Born in the heart of the darkness of the jungle, Macunaima is a complex of contradictory traits (he is, of course, ‘a hero without a character’), and can at will magically change his age, his race, his geographic location, to suit his purposes and overcome obstacles. Dramatizing aspects of Brazil in transition (multiracial, Indian versus European, rural versus urban life), Macunaima undergoes sometimes hilarious, sometimes grotesque transformations until his final annihilation and apotheosis as the Great Bear constellation in the heavens. . One of the founders of the Modernist Movement of Brazil, MARIO DE ANDRADE was born in São Paulo in 1893. He studied at the Conservatory of Music and Drama, but his scholarly training also extended to anthropology and folklore. He wrote what is still regarded as some of the most important work in twentieth-century Brazilian poetry, and copious literary music and art criticism. He is similar to Cocteau in the force and versatility of his artistic character, but closer to Breton in the critical impact that his work had on the avant-garde in the post - World War I period of Brazilian letters. Mario de Andrade died in 1945.

Mário Raul de Morais Andrade (October 9, 1893 – February 25, 1945) was a Brazilian poet, novelist, musicologist, art historian and critic, and photographer. One of the founders of Brazilian modernism, he virtually created modern Brazilian poetry with the publication of his Paulicéia Desvairada (Hallucinated City) in 1922. He has had an enormous influence on modern Brazilian literature, and as a scholar and essayist—he was a pioneer of the field of ethnomusicology—his influence has reached far beyond Brazil. Andrade was the central figure in the avant-garde movement of São Paulo for twenty years. Trained as a musician and best known as a poet and novelist, Andrade was personally involved in virtually every discipline that was connected with São Paulo modernism, and became Brazil's national polymath. His photography and essays on a wide variety of subjects, from history to literature and music, were widely published. He was the driving force behind the Week of Modern Art, the 1922 event that reshaped both literature and the visual arts in Brazil, and a member of the avant-garde ‘Group of Five.’ The ideas behind the Week were further explored in the preface to his poetry collection Pauliceia Desvairada, and in the poems themselves. After working as a music professor and newspaper columnist he published his great novel, Macunaíma, in 1928. Work on Brazilian folk music, poetry, and other concerns followed unevenly, often interrupted by Andrade's shifting relationship with the Brazilian government. At the end of his life, he became the founding director of São Paulo's Department of Culture, formalizing a role he had long held as the catalyst of the city's—and the nation's—entry into artistic modernity.
Angel, Adriana and Macintosh, Fiona. The Tiger's Milk: Women of Nicaragua. New York. 1987. Seaver/Henry Holt. 0805006389. 142 pages. hardcover.

Since the revolution in 1979, when the Sandanista government came to power, Nicaragua has been the focus of intense public scrutiny. Yet political rhetoric, media simplification, even passionate emotional support have often obscured the struggles and achievements of the Nicaraguan people. This powerful and beautifully illustrated book records with rare authenticity the voices of Nicaraguan women, young and old, describing their suffering, their exploitation, and the moving detail of their daily lives. Sudden new freedoms and responsibilities have made their former lives of narrow domesticity increasingly untenable; now they are challenging traditional attitudes to women as they help to shape the new Nicaragua.

Adriana Angel and Fiona Macintosh are both photographers and writers. Since the revolution they have lived and worked in Nicaragua.
Angelo, Ivan. The Celebration. New York. 1982. Avon/Bard. 038078808x. Paperback Original. Translated from the Portuguese by Thomas Colchie. 223 pages. paperback.

THE TRIUMPH OF CENSORSHIP. In one of the most controversial novels to emerge from modern Brazil, Ivan Angelo tells of the strange reality of Latin America as revealed by the omissions of censorship. The time is the evening of March 30th, 1970, when a group of wealthy people gather for a birthday celebration. Simultaneously a group of migrant workers is halted from settling in the town by the police. In time the two groups become involved with each other, and the police begin their investigation, their degradation, and their torture of the workers and party-goers. If is only in the long final chapter, ‘After the Celebration,’ that the police and the reader are able to construct the horrifying climax. Upon its publication in 1976, Ivan Angelo said, ‘I hope to make the reader an accomplice not only in shaping the actual text, but in determining ifs significance, since my intention has been to provide wider participation in the terrible problems we face at the moment, in Brazil.’

IVAN ANGELO was born in Minas Gerais, Brazil, in 1936. He is a professional journalist. managing editor of the Jornal do Tarde, the influential evening daily in São Paulo. He has published a collection of short stories. DUAS FACES (TWO SIDES), which won the principal literary prize of his home state and launched his literary career. A second work, CASA DE VIDRO (HOUSE OF GLASS), appeared in 1979, and he is now at work on a novel about a Brazilian politician’s career. THE CELEBRATION has been published in France as well as by Avon-Bard in the United States. THOMAS COLCHIE is well known for his translations of Puig, Drummond, Ramos, and Souza, whose first novel, THE EMPEROR OF THE AMAZON, was praised upon its first publication by Avon-Bard.
Angelo, Ivan. The Tower of Glass. New York. 1986. Avon/Bard. 0380896079. Paperback Original. Translated from the Portuguese by Ellen Watson. 195 pages. paperback.

A CAPTIVITY OF THE SOUL - Five interlocking tales create a singular, powerful account of a nation in turmoil - and a prophetic warning about an oppressive government’s need to control not just the society but the mind. Through symbolism, wry humor, and outrageous sexual frankness, Ivan Angelo tells of businessmen and whores, poor working people and Death Squads, truth and illusion, and the methods of political manipulation and terror. From the gritty, bawdy story of Bete the streetwalker to the Kafkaesque portrait of a prison made of glass, these five fictional pieces glitter with the brilliance of masterful wordplay and shocking truth . . . as an accomplished storyteller challenges our intelligence and our principles with a monumental work of art. . IVAN ANGELO was born in Minas Gerais, Brazil in 1936. He is a professional journalist, managing editor of the Jornal da Tarde, the influential evening daily in Sao Paulo. He has published a collection of short stories, DUAS FACES (TWO SIDES), which won the principal literary prize of his home state and launched his literary career. A second work, THE TOWER OF GLASS, appeared in 1979, and he is now at work on a novel about a Brazilian politician’s career.

IVAN ANGELO was born in Minas Gerais, Brazil, in 1936. He is a professional journalist. managing editor of the Jornal do Tarde, the influential evening daily in São Paulo. He has published a collection of short stories. DUAS FACES (TWO SIDES), which won the principal literary prize of his home state and launched his literary career. A second work, CASA DE VIDRO (HOUSE OF GLASS), appeared in 1979, and he is now at work on a novel about a Brazilian politician’s career. THE CELEBRATION has been published in France as well as by Avon-Bard in the United States. THOMAS COLCHIE is well known for his translations of Puig, Drummond, Ramos, and Souza, whose first novel, THE EMPEROR OF THE AMAZON, was praised upon its first publication by Avon-Bard.
Anglesey, Zoe (editor). Ixok Amar Go: Central American Women's Poetry For Peace. Penobscot. 1987. Granite Press. 0961488638. 615 pages. paperback. Cover illustration by Carmen Naranjo, 'Ventana de Ojos Ambiciosos'.

The title in Mayan means ‘women going forward with love without bitterness’. This first bilingual anthology of Central American women’s poetry includes poems by over fifty women, featuring the work of Claribel Alegria, El Salvador; Gioconda Belli and Daisy Zamora, Nicaragua; Clementina Suárez, Honduras; Carmen Naranjo and Diana Avila, Costa Rica; Ana Maria Rodas, Guatemala; and Bessy Reyna and Bertalicia Peralta, Panama. The list of translators includes Magda Bogin, Zoë Anglesey, Denise Levertov, Alicia Partnoy, Patricia Jones and Patricia Goedicke. PRAISE for IXOK AMAR-GO - ‘Reading this collection is something like going to a party to which all your friends who are far away have been invited and also all the strangers you’ve been waiting to meet. And they speak to you and sing to you in three languages-English and Spanish and the third is the common language of poetry.’ - GRACE PALEY. . . ‘Many thanks to Granite Press for this new world anthology! From countries hitherto represented by heads of state or soldiers, or photographs of cane fields and mountains, at last we may listen to the poems of the truly various women of Central America: Spanish speaking women who must choose the words of their own first poetry with as much courage, with as much care, as many of them must learn to assemble, and load, a machine gun, blindfolded. These new women poets give to us the rising, powerful new lyrics of a multi-faceted First World revolution that is, at its deepening heart, a movement into justice that will make tenderness everywhere more possible.’ - JUNE JORDAN. . . ‘IXOK AMAR GO is not just another collection of Central American poets but an extraordinary celebration of women’s voices sharing a rich history of struggles and victories and also a multicultural and multilingual experience. The poems and poets speak to us with impassioned honesty and lyricism. They also speak of love and torture, disappearances and grief. Yet, their words are no longer the vestiges of a colonized people. Their words are alive. This collection must be cherished and read slowly because we must never forget all the pain and love these words carry. BRAVO.’ - MARJORIE AGOSIN, Chilean Poet and Professor at Wellesley College. POETAS / COLABORADORAS (Poets/Collaborators) - Luz Marina Acosta; Claribel Alegria; Diana Avila; Margarita Azurdia; Alba Barrios; June Beer; Gioconda Belli; Alenka Bermüdez; Yolanda Blanco; Anaima Café; Caly Domitila Cane’k; Margarita Carrera; Bernardina Guevara Corvera; Argentina Daley; Julieta Dobles; Mercedes Durand; Jacinta Escudos; Julia Esquivél; Janina Fernández; Martivón Galindo; Mia Galiegos; Celina Garcia; Leonor Garnier; Virginia Grütter; Reyna Hernández; Ana Ilce; Ana Istaru; Liliam Jiménez; Mayra Jimenez; Loxa Jiménez Lopez; Mirna Martinez; Sara Martinez; Carmen Matute; Waldina Medina; Vidaluz Meneses; Marianella Corriols Molina; Diana Moran; Rosario Murillo; Michéle Najlis; Carmen Naranjo; Moravia Ochoa; Esther Maria Osses; Bertalicia Peralta; Eva Margarita Ortiz Platero; Delia QuinOnez; Debora Elizabet Ramos; Margaret Randall; Bessy Reyna; Ana Maria Rodas; Christian Santos; Clementina Suárez; Consuelo Tomás; Maria Perez Tzu; Helen Umaña; Ana del Carmen de Vazquez; Luz Méndez de la Vega; Mariana Yonusg; Daisy Zamora; TRADUCTORAS (Translators) - Miriam Adelman; Amina Muñoz-Ali; Zoë Anglesey; Electa Arenal; Lynne Byer; Yolanda Blanco; Magda Bogin; Ellen Calmus; Pamela Carmell; Gina Caruso; Barbara Dagg; Argentina Daley; Carmen G. Delgado; Sharon Doubiago; Miriam Ellis; Nancy Esposito; Jean Franco; Celina Garcia; Jane Glazer; Patricia Goedicke; Melinda Goodman; Isabella Halsted; Sally Hanlon; Iraida Iturralde; Patricia Jones; Lisa Maya Knauer; Jere Knight; Amparo Leon; Denise Levertov; Suzanne Jill Levine; Elizabeth Linder; Elizabeth Mackiln; Susan Matobo; Ma~ McAnally; Nelly Meléndez; Sara Miles; Barbara la Morticella; Alicia Partnoy; Barbara Paschke; Ambar Past; Elinor Randall; Victoria Redel; Mary Lou Reker; Bessy Reyna; Judith Roche; Janet Rodney; Susan Sherman; Julia Stein; Susana Stettri; Ana Maria Toro; Janine Pommy Vega; Lisa Vives; Anna Kirwan-Vogel; Anne Waldman; Ellen Watson; Kathleen Weaver; C.D. Wright; Janelle Yates.

ZOE ANGLESEY has been a political- literary activist on behalf of the people and the literature of Central America since 1968. Her book SOMETHING MORE THAN FORCE, POEMS FOR GUATEMALA 1971-83 (Adastra), now in its second edition, received honorable mention from the Before Columbus Foundation, sharing honors with other American poets and with Ernesto Cardenal.
Anselmo, Reverge. The Cadillac of Six-Bys. New York. 1997. Harper Collins. 0061012092. 193 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Carl D. Galian. Front cover photo courtesy of the author.

On the shore of the great sea which is the cradle of civilization, under the shadow of towering cedars, lies the rubble of a once majestic city. The gazes of native eyes, friend and enemy, calculate the tricks of living in a hot zone of the Cold War. Strange, imponderable loves rise in a falling city, and the death gong tolls with the sounds of timeless song. The Levant. An ancient land of battle and deception. After ten years of civil war, U.S. Marines land in the chaos. Factional fighting rips the city, and the Marines hold out in the cross fire. For Cazetti, a young Intelligence man with a bad record, it is a world of the war-wise: spies and survivors, innocents and wounded. Those like Hitman Hitchins, a loose agent with a lurking in his heart; Sardine, a treacherous vamp; Philomena, a direct, endearing nun determined to save Cazetti’s soul; Cercio, a playboy lieutenant; and Minovich and Davey, hanging on since Vietnam to do it all again. With enemy artillery raining down on all sides, and the perimeter lines pinned down, nothing, it seems, can save these men from the apocalyptic specter they know is coming. A dramatic, vivid story of love and war in a devious and bloody world, THE CADILLAC OF SIX-BY’S brings you into the hearts of men who lived and died by fire, in a place and time now faint in the wake of history.

Reverge Anselmo was born in Mexico City in 1962. He served three years in the U.S. Marine Corps and is a survivor of the Expedition sent to Lebanon. He graduated the Erv Malnarich Outfitters and Guides School in Hamilton, Montana, and attended St. John’s College in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He lived for many years in Paris and was a businessman in Europe and Latin America. He is the son of the late Rene Anselmo, the communications tycoon. THE CADILLAC OF SIX-BY’S is his first novel.
Aparain, Mario Delgado. The Ballad of Johnny Sosa. Woodstock. 2002. Overlook Press. 1585672246. Translated from the Spanish by Elizabeth Hampsten. 122 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Yellowstone Ltd. Front jacket photographs: top, (c) Will & Deni McIntyre/Tony Stone images; bottom, (c) Peter Dazeley/Tony Stone images. Author photograph (c) Nancy Urratia.

Published now in ten countries to extraordinary acclaim and available in English for the first time, THE BALLAD OF JOHNNY SOSA depicts an ordinary man trying to live out his dreams in a dreary provincial town in central Uruguay while suffocating in the tentacles of military oppression. Every night, Johnny Sosa, a poor, young, black musician, sings melancholic soul music in the small bar in the town’s brothel, dreaming of a life beyond his confining world, and for a few hours each day ignoring the secretive and oppressive military regime - a dictatorship not so much seen as felt-that has taken over his country. He attracts the attention of the local military leader who uses Sosa for his own political ends and, for a while, Johnny is permitted to sing and to imagine that he will perform at the national festival, where discovery and success may well be waiting for him. However, as his friends mysteriously start to disappear, Johnny begins to realize the price of his dream, and he must decide if he will pay it. The stripped-down quality of its prose, deft ironies, and tragi-comic insight into the strength of human nature under adversity all contribute to the prolonged impact of this penetrating novel from a country now reclaiming its literary tradition. Masterfully subversive and utterly brilliant, THE BALLAD OF JOHNNY SOSA is a finely honed parable on human dignity.

MARIO DELGADO APARAIN is a novelist and short story writer as well as a journalist and university professor. He first became famous in Uruguay for his short stories, which depicted the contrast between country and city life of Uruguayans. He lives in Montevideo, Uruguay, where he works at the Department of Culture, which he previously headed.
Aponte, Barbara Bockus. Alfonso Reyes and Spain. Austin. 1972. University Of Texas Press. 0292703007. 206 pages. hardcover.

Alfonso Reyes, the great humanist and man of letters of contemporary Spanish America, began his literary career just before the outbreak of the Mexican Revolution of 1910. He spearheaded the radical shift in Mexico’s cultural and philosophical orientation as a leading member of the famous ‘Athenaeum Generation.’ The crucial years of his literary formation, however, were those he spent in Spain (1914-1924). He arrived in Madrid unknown and unsure of his future. When he left, he had achieved both professional maturity and wide acclaim as a writer. This book has, as its basis, the remarkable correspondence between Reyes and some of the leading spirits of the Spanish intellectual world, covering not only his years in Spain but also later exchanges of letters. Although Reyes always made it clear that he was a Mexican and a Spanish American, be became a full-fledged member of the closed aristocracy of Spanish literature. It was the most brilliant period in Spain’s cultural history since the Golden Age, and is richly represented here by Reyes’ association with five of its most important figures: Miguel de Unamuno and Ramon del Valle-Inclan were of the great ‘Generation of 98’, among the younger writers were Jose Ortega y Gasset, essayist and philosopher, the Nobel poet Juan Ramon Jimenez, and Ramon Gomez de la Serna, a precursor of surrealism. Alfonso Reyes maintained lifelong friendships with these men, and their exchanges of letters are of a dual significance. They reveal how the years in Spain allowed Reyes to pursue his vocation independently, thereby prompting him to seek universal values. Coincidentally, they provide a unique glimpse in to the inner world of those friends - and their dreams of a new Spain.

Barbara Bockus Aponte, associate professor of Spanish at Temple University and Co-Chairman of the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, has studied in Mexico in addition to collecting material there for this book. She has previously published several articles on Reyes in scholarly journals.
Apreza, Yolanda Castro / Woodcock, Charlene / K’inal Antsetik, A.C. (editors). Weaving Chiapas: Maya Women’s Lives in a Changing World. Norman. 2018. University of Oklahoma Press. 9780806159836. Foreword By: Inés Castro Apreza. Translated By: Leíre Gutiérrez. 16 COLOR AND 31 B&W ILLUS. AND 1 MAP. 6 x 9. 288 pages. paperback.

In the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico, a large indigenous population lives in rural communities, many of which retain traditional forms of governance. In 1996, some 350 women of these communities formed a weavers’ cooperative, which they called Jolom Mayaetik. Their goal was to join together to market textiles of high quality in both new and ancient designs. Weaving Chiapas offers a rare view of the daily lives, memories, and hopes of these rural Maya women as they strive to retain their ancient customs while adapting to a rapidly changing world. Originally published in Spanish in 2007, this book captures firsthand the voices of these Maya artisans, whose experiences, including the challenges of living in a highly patriarchal culture, often escape the attention of mainstream scholarship. Based on interviews conducted with members of the Jolom Mayaetik cooperative, the accounts gathered in this volume provide an intimate view of women’s life in the Chiapas highlands, known locally as Los Altos. We learn about their experiences of childhood, marriage, and childbirth; about subsistence farming and food traditions; and about the particular styles of clothing and even hairstyles that vary from community to community. Restricted by custom from engaging in public occupations, Los Altos women are responsible for managing their households and caring for domestic animals. But many of them long for broader opportunities, and the Jolom Mayaetik cooperative represents a bold effort by its members to assume control over and build a wider market for their own work. This English-language edition features color photographs—published here for the first time—depicting many of the individual women and their stunning textiles. A new preface, chapter introductions, and a scholarly afterword frame the women’s narratives and place their accounts within cultural and historical context.

Yolanda Castro Apreza is a cofounder, along with Micaela Hernández Meza, of K’inal Antsetik, A.C. Charlene M. Woodcock is retired as an acquisitions editor at the University of California Press and has been a volunteer with the Jolom Mayaetik weavers’ cooperative since 2000. K’inal Antsetik, A.C., a Mexican nonprofit organization that supports economic self-help projects throughout Chiapas, facilitated the Spanish edition of this volume.
Apuleyo Mendoza, Plinio and Garcia Marquez, Gabriel. Fragrance of Guava: Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza in Conversation With Gabriel Garcia Marquez. London. 1983. Verso. 0860917657. Translated from the Spanish by Ann Wright. 126 pages. paperback. Cover design by Chris Millett

‘ . . . one can reduce the whole enigma of the tropics to the fragrance of a rotten guava. ‘I remember when I was a very small boy in Aracataca, my grandfather took me to the circus to see a dromedary. Another day, when I told him I hadn’t seen the ice on show, he took me to the banana company’s settlement and asked them to open up a crate of frozen mullet and made me put my hand in. The whole of ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE began with that one image.’ - Gabriel Garcia Marquez. . . The Nobel Prize awarded to Gabriel Garcia Marquez in 1982, merely confirmed his importance in reshaping the map of Latin American literature. This book presents an unusual portrait of the great ‘magic realist’. In conversation with Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza - himself a distinguished Colombian novelist - Marquez reflects on literature, the violent contrasts of South America, his family and politics. He discusses in detail the two works that are central to his reputation: ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE and THE AUTUMN OF THE PATRIARCH. His commitment to the liberation struggles of Central and South America is revealed in his firm support for the Sandinista government of Nicaragua, and his solidarity with Cuba. These conversations between two friends, relaxed and uninhibited, will fascinate and reward Marquez’s English-speaking readers.

Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza (born 1932) is a Colombian journalist, writer, and diplomat. Mendoza was named in honour to the Roman authors Pliny the Younger and Apuleius. Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza born in Tunja, Boyacá in 1932, son of the lawyer and politic Plinio Mendoza Neira, who was witness to the murder of Jorge Eliécer Gaitán. He studied Politic Sciences at The Sorbonne in Paris. He is very well known for his close friendship with the literature Nobel prize winner Gabriel García Márquez. Mendoza and García Márquez spent time in Europe during the early 60s. Mendoza published a biographical novel regarding the life and anecdotes of García Márquez and their circle of friends, poets, and writers during those years in Europe. The book was entitled "The Fragrance of the Guava". Mendoza served as First Secretary of the Colombian Embassy in France, writing newspaper articles for several international publications at the same time.After returning to Colombia in 1959, he became a full-time writer and journalist.
Aranha, Graca. Canaan. Boston. 1920. Four Seas Company. Translated from the Portuguese by Mariano Joaquin Lorente. 321 pages. hardcover.

CANAAN is a novel of the emigration of a young German to Brazil in the 1920s that deals with issues of race and ethnicity and how these influence notions of nationalist purity and pride. The novel’s narration takes the form of a dialogue between two German immigrants. In it Aryan purity is pitted against the potential harmony of Brazil’s racial admixture. The novel is a bitter and truceless struggle between old Brazil and the European immigrants.

José Pereira da Graça Aranha (June 21, 1868 – January 26, 1931) was a Brazilian writer and diplomat, considered to be a forerunner of the Modernism in Brazil. He was also one of the organizers of the Brazilian Modern Art Week of 1922. He founded and occupied the 38th chair of the Brazilian Academy of Letters from 1897 until his death in 1931. However, he would break all his relations with the Academy in 1924, accusing it of being "old-fashioned". Graça Aranha was born in São Luís, to a rich and cultured family, son of journalist Temístocles da Silva Maciel Aranha and Maria da Glória da Graça. He was a prodigy, having completed his secondary studies when 13 years old, and went to study Law in Recife. He graduated with honours in 1886 and travelled to the South to work. He became a judge in Porto do Cachoeiro, a village in the backlands of the state of Espírito Santo. This experience was used by him in one of his best known novels, Canaã, a great editorial success in 1902. The novel explored the conflicts of the Brazilian immigrants. According to author Raymond Leslie Williams: 'Along with Os Sertões (by Euclides da Cunha), Canaã was one of the most widely read and discussed books in Brazil in the early part of the century. Canaã is a work of ideas rather than actions, and one of the central ideas that Graça Aranha promotes is that culture in the broadest sense (cultura) is the ultimate answer to society's ills.' Without having published any books, Graça Aranha was invited to be one of the 40 founding members of the Brazilian Academy of Letter in 1897, by Machado de Assis, Joaquim Nabuco and Lúcio de Mendonça. In 1900, he was admitted to the Foreign Service as a career diplomat. He worked as such for the next 20 years. While he was stationed in Paris, France, he wrote another success in 1911, the theater drama Malazarte. He retired as a diplomat in 1919 and returned to Brazil in 1921. Graça Aranha sponsored modernism in the letters and arts and had several personality clashes with the traditionalists at the Academy, headed by writer Coelho Neto. He allied himself to other budding modernists of São Paulo and organized the revolutionary Week of Modern Art in February 1922. He opened the week under booing of an hostile audience, with a conference titled "The aesthetic emotion in modern art". Shortly before the "Week", Graça Aranha published in 1921 an influential theoretical essay, "Estética da Vida" (An Aesthetics of Life), where he analysed the relationship of Brazilian soul with nature, a recurrent theme at the time. He argued that the three main races had formed the "soul" or essence of the Brazilian people by adding three basic emotions to culture: the Portuguese's melancholy, African childishness and "cosmic terror", and the Indians' "metaphysics of terror", or the use of ghosts. He proposed that Brazilian culture should strive to achieve a new relationship to nature, based on the incorporation of such feelings into art and by overcoming the ethnic differences by means of an integration between the I and the cosmos. Due to his participation, Graça Aranha was ostracised in the Academy, but he persisted, to the point even that on June 19, 1924 he stated in a conference, titled "The modern spirit" at the Academy, that its creation had been an error. A few months later, on October 18, he resigned from the Academy. In the same year, he founded with Renato Almeida a modernist literature review and magazine, Movimento Brasileiro, which lasted until just after his death. His last novel, published in 1929 was A Viagem Maravilhosa (The Marvelous Journey), which was not so well received by the critics. He also wrote an incomplete autobiography, which was published posthumously in 1931. After his death, a group of intellectuals and friends established the Graça Aranha Foundation, a project which was devised by him. One of the Foundation's aims was to award prized in the arts and literature to distinguished Brazilians who excelled in these fields. Among the most famous awardees were writers Jorge Amado, Rachel de Queiroz, José Lins do Rego, Érico Verissimo, Clarice Lispector, Lêdo Ivo and Alphonsus de Guimaraens Filho. The Foundation, which was maintained by Nazareth Prado, closed down only a year later, when funds for awarding prizes were exhausted.
Arciniegas, German (editor). The Green Continent: A Comprehensive View of Latin America by Its Leading Writers. New York. 1944. Knopf. Translated from the Spanish by Harriet de Onis and others. 533 pages.

Includes a variety of selections from important novels, short stories, historical, and literary essays from the first half of the twentieth century. Selections by: Ciro Alegria (Peru), Alcides Arguedas (Bolivia), Benjamin Carrion (Ecuador), Gregorio Castañeda Aragon (Colombia), Augusto Céspedes (Bolivia), Genaro Estrada (Mexico), Rómulo Gallegos (Venezuela), Martin Luis Guzmán (Mexico), Flavio Herrera (Guatemala), Mariano Latorre (Chile), Leopoldo Lugones (Argentina), Jorge Mañach (Cuba), Juan Meléndez (Peru), Jules Mancini (Colombia), Juan Mann (Chile), Gabriela Mistral (Chile), José Nucete Sardi (Venezuela), Victoria Ocampo (Argentina), Juan E. O'Leary (Paraguay), Raol Porras Barrenechea (Peru), Alfonso Reyes (Mexico), Julio Rinaldini (Argentina), Ricardo Rojas (Argentina), José Enrique Rodo (Uruguay), José Eustasio Rivera (Colombia), Baldomero Sanin Cano (Colombia), Domingo Faustino Sarmiento (Argentina), Armando Solano (Colombia), José Vasconcelos (Mexico). (reprint London: Editions Poetry, 1947. 483 p.).

Germán Arciniegas Angueyra (December 6, 1900 - November 30, 1999) was a Colombian historian, author and journalist who was known for his advocacy of educational and cultural issues, as well as his outspoken opposition to dictatorship. He also served as a college professor and held positions in the government, including Minister of Education and several ambassadorships. Arciniegas was the son of Rafael Arciniegas Tavera, a farmer, and his wife Aurora Angueyra Figueredo. He had three brothers and four sisters. His father died young, leaving his mother struggling to support the family. His maternal great-grandfather was Perucho Figueredo, an early Cuban freedom fighter who wrote La Bayamesa, Cuba's national anthem. Both of Perucho's daughters fled the country when he was executed. Luz, the younger daughter, was married to a Cuban engineer who went to Colombia to help build a railroad line. It was there, amid the dangers of the jungle, that Germán's mother was born. At the age of eighteen, he began studying law at the National University of Colombia. At that time he had already created two journals: Año Quinto (1916) and Voz de la Juventud (1917). While a student he founded and managed the magazine Universidad (1921). He collaborated with many well-known figures at all three periodicals, including Luis López de Mesa, José Vasconcelos, León de Greiff and José Juan Tablada, who introduced the haiku into Spanish literature via Universidad. His love of journalism led him to establish and manage numerous cultural magazines throughout his life. In 1928, he joined El Tiempo, a daily newspaper in Bogotá, where he managed the editorial section, put together the Sunday Literary Supplement and wrote a weekly column, becoming the general manager in 1937. He would continue to contribute articles and opinion pieces to El Tiempo for the rest of his life, speaking out against drug trafficking, Marxist guerrillas and restrictive immigration policies. With the assistance of Carlos Pellicer, he established the Federation of Colombian Students. The group opposed Jesuit influence in the nation's universities and held student carnivals which verged on riots. He narrowly missed being killed when a bullet grazed his head at one student rally. Their activism eventually helped to end the Conservative Party's grip on the government and, in 1933, led to the passage of university reforms, which gave students the right to elect their own rectors and have a representative in the legislature to act as their advocate; a position Arciniegas held for a time. For him, students were the axis around which all political and intellectual movements had turned throughout history. This gave rise to his first book El Estudiante de la Mesa Redonda (The Student of the Round Table, 1932), in which he speaks of history as a "tavern" with the students sitting at a single table, drinking, recounting their deeds and laughing at everybody else. He continued his fight for students' rights during his brief tenures as Minister of Education in 1942 and 1945-46. During this time, he founded the Caro and Cuervo Institute and moved the Colombian National Museum to its current home in a former prison building. During World War II, he supported giving aid and asylum to refugees. This was in opposition to Luis López de Mesa, the Minister of Foreign Affairs, who prohibited the entry of Jews into Colombia. Due to this resurgence of Conservative ideology in the 1940s, Arciniegas felt that he and his family were in danger and moved to the United States, taking advantage of an offer to teach at Columbia University. He lived in New York for ten years (1947–57). At this time, he wrote his most important and most often banned book, Entre la Libertad y el Miedo (Between Freedom and Fear, 1952). The work analyzes a critical period in Latin-America, when seven dictators were in power at the same time. He also criticized the U.S. State Department for its conciliatory behavior towards these regimes and, as a result, was detained for questioning several times after returning from trips abroad. The publication and translation of the book was prohibited in at least ten countries. General Gustavo Rojas Pinilla, the President of Colombia, accused Arciniegas of being a Communist and ordered all of his books to be burnt. Rafael Trujillo, the dictator of the Dominican Republic, put Arciniegas on his hit list. In terms of culture, Arciniegas strove to achieve and maintain a synthesis between the indigenous and the European. This approach was the driving force behind all of his diplomatic and political activities. He served as vice consul in London (1929), chancellor at the Colombian embassy in Argentina (1940) and as Ambassador to Italy (1959), Israel (1962), Venezuela (1966) and the Holy See (1976). In all of these positions, he acted as an advocate for the art and culture of America, which he perceived as extending from Alaska to Patagonia. In 1992, he was appointed President of the National Commission for the Celebration of the Five-Hundredeth Anniversary of the Discovery of America. He was summarily dismissed by then First-Lady Ana Milena Muñoz de Gaviria, who took over the commission herself; an action that generated much controversy.
Arcocha, Juan. A Candle in the Wind. New York. 1967. Lyle Stuart. 187 pages. hardcover.

For Luis Enrique Ferro, the Cuban Revolution was love like a hundred thousand doves. He thought: ‘A country in revolution is like a striptease on a circular stage. Each spectator discovers a different part of the performer’s anatomy. But who discovers her soul?’ For Enrique Yánez, hero of the Revolution, it was ‘just as if Batista were still in power. The Reds are stealing our Revolution right out from under us.’ For Mercedes, the counter-revolutionary who would do anything for love, the Revolution was a time of hatred. Her voice was soft, wrapped in violins, when she asked Luis: ‘Do you remember the last night we were together? I almost gave myself to you that night.’ For Manolo the Revolution was a force that must show no mercy. His credo was: ‘Against counter - revolutionary terror, we must wield revolutionary terror.’ For Esteban, the dedicated engineer who was Luis Enrique’s brother, the Revolution meant closed horizons. He thought: ‘Fidel is always crowing, and Luis repeats him like a parrot, that the Revolution has opened limitless horizons for the youth. But for me there is no opportunity for advancement, except by getting involved in politics.’ For Esteban’s wife, Consuelo, the Revolution was a cancer poisoning their lives. For Ché Guevara, the ogre of the counterrevolution, the enigmatic Argentinian about whom a thousand stories circulated, Fidel’s eminence grise, the reddest Red in the whole government, the Revolution meant learning a job of which he knew nothing when he was appointed. The drama of their lives flashed against a backdrop of the lonely nights on militia watch, the secret trysts of love, the magic of Old Havana, the bureaucratic intrigues of the glass factory, the sweat and camaraderie of the cane-cutting expeditions, the white sands of Varadero Beach. Then came the invasion. And for all of them the Revolution confirmed in some harsh, inexorable way what they had somehow always known.

JUAN ARCOCHA (November 7, 1927 – May 7, 2010) was born in the Havana he writes about: As a gifted student he won a fellowship to study in Paris where he lived for six years. Then, when Batista fell in 1959, he returned to Havana. There he became staff writer and editorial assistant to Carlos Franqui, one of the early revolutionaries and the editor of the newspaper Revolución. In 1961 he was sent to Moscow as correspondent for Russia and lived there for about a year. A subsequent marriage to a Russian girl failed and was part of his disillusionment with the USSR: there was no confidence even between husband and wife: she lied to him constantly about political matters. He returned to Havana but Fidel Castro assigned him to Paris as cultural attaché for the Cuban government. A year ago he visited Cuba to talk out his problems with Castro. Castro told him to do whatever he wanted to do and said, ‘I ask of you only one thing. Tell the truth.’ Arcocha no longer works for the Cuban government but does work in Paris on a contract basis for UNESCO and other United Nations agencies. A CANDLE IN THE WIND shows Arcocha’s dilemma. Like many of the characters in the book he is a partisan of the Revolution but feels strongly the paradox and doubts which followed the metamorphosis from a middle class to a communist culture. This is his second book but the first published in English. His first novel has been contracted for by Feltrinelli, the original publishers of DR. ZHIVAGO.
Arenal, Humberto. The Sun Beats Down: A Novella of the Cuban Revolution. New York. 1959. Hill & Wang. Translated from the Spanish by Joseph M. Bernstein. 96 pages. hardcover.

This fast-paced, compact novel reveals more about the Cuban revolution than any number of serious editorials and articles. Based on an actual incident, THE SUN BEATS DOWN tells how a group of young revolutionists kidnaps a famous Mexican prize fighter from the lobby of Havana’s busiest hotel. Frantically the Batista police comb the city. The young wife of one of the group is seized and brutally tortured; one of the revolutionists is shot down by the police; another escapes after a desperate chase through the back alleys of the city. But, in the end, after the prize fight is canceled, the fighter is ‘returned’ unharmed to the Mexican Embassy. Here is an exciting, thrill-packed novella that will leave the reader breathless. The author is a young Cuban, now living in New York. He knows both Fidel and Raul Castro, and has been in close touch with the anti-Batista movement since its inception. . .

Humberto Arenal (January 15, 1926, Havana, Cuba - January 26, 2012, Havana, Cuba) was a Cuban writer, playwright and theater director. During his career Arenal was the director of major cultural institutions on the island, such as the Teatro Nacional, the Teatro Musical de La Habana, the Conjunto Dramatico of Matanzas and the Teatro Lirico Nacional de Cuba. The author of El sol a plomo (1959), Los animales sagrados (1967) and Quien mato a Ivan Ivanovich? (1995), Arenal won the National Prize for Literature in 2007. He is still remembered for the great success of his open-air staging of the play Aire frio, by Virgilio Piñera, in 1962. Humberto Arenal died January 26, 2012 in Havana at the age of 85.
Arenas, Reinaldo. Autoepitaph: Selected Poems. Gainesville. 2014. University Press of Florida. 9780813049731. Translated from the Spanish by Kelly Washbourne. Edited by Camelly Cruz-martes. 364 pages. hardcover. Front: Portrait of Reinaldo Arenas in Caracas, Venezuela, by Vasco Szinetar.

‘In Autoepitaph, Reinaldo Arenas soars above death, conquers terror, and sees himself reflected in the face of his lover, the Cuban sea.’--Flora González Mandri, coeditor and cotranslator of In the Vortex of the Cyclone: Selected Poems by Excilia Saldaña. ‘A powerful tribute to Arenas, a poet who explores the meaning of our ethical standing in the world as well as the transient nature of our souls. In this collection, we journey with Arenas into his struggles and victories, accompanied by his voice, filled with fortitude and hope. The English translation pays tribute to the original Spanish text.’--Marjorie Agosín, author of Of Earth and Sea: A Chilean Memoir. Reinaldo Arenas (1943-1990) remains one of the most famous Cuban writers in exile. His work constitutes a monument of resistance literature, but much of the focus has been on his novels and his autobiobiography, Before Night Falls, chosen as one of the ten best books of 1993 by the New York Times. Because his poetic output has not been widely translated, Autoepitaph will be the only volume currently in print of Arenas's poetry in translation in any language. This bilingual volume includes narrative poems, sonnets, excerpts from Arenas's prose poems, and previously unpublished works from his papers at Princeton University. Both the Spanish originals as well as English translations seamlessly capture the poet's sarcasm, humor, and powerful rhythms. Camelly Cruz-Martes provides an outline for Arenas's major poetic strategies, as well as context for the themes that unite his poems: resistance against colonialism, political and personal repression, existential alienation, and the desire for transcendence through art.

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943, Oriente Province, Cuba - December 7, 1990, New York City, NY) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright. Camelly Cruz-Martes is associate professor of Spanish at Walsh University. Kelly Washbourne is associate professor of Spanish translation at Kent State University. He has translated six books from Spanish to English and is the author of Manual of Spanish-English Translation.
Arenas, Reinaldo. El Central. New York. 1984. Avon/Bard. 0380869349. Paperback Original. Translated from the Spanish by Anthony Kerrigan. 93 pages. paperback.

‘BEAUTIFUL IS THE FIGURE OF THE NAKED INDIAN IN THE LONGED FOR LAND OF MY DREAMS.’ A young dreamer, still only a teenager, finds himself conscripted by the current regime and assigned to exhausting labor at a Cuban sugar mill. There, breathing the sweet odor of boiling sugar and cut cane, he is haunted by visions of a past that is both irrevocably lost and star-tingly present . . . terrifying scenes that resurrect memories of awesome brutality, sexual mistreatment, and horrors that chill the blood . . . a bitter history that captures both the eternal beauty of an earthly paradise - and the source of its continuing pain. In a moving prose epic, vibrant with symbolism, satire, and scathing social commentary, an extraordinary poet brings to life today’s complex Cuba: A troubled island whose people dare to dream and sing . . . but like the caged bird, from the depths of their despair and desire for freedom.

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government. Arenas was born in the countryside, in the northern part of the Province of Oriente, Cuba, and later moved to the city of Holguín. In 1963, he moved to Havana to enroll in the School of Planification and, later, in the Faculty of Letters at the Universidad de La Habana, where he studied philosophy and literature without completing a degree. The following year, he began working at the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí. While there, his talent was noticed and he was awarded prizes at Cirilo Villaverde National Competition held by UNEAC (National Union of Cuban Writers and Artists). (Soto 1998) Interestingly, his Hallucinations was awarded ‘first Honorable Mention’ in 1966 although, as the judges could find no better entry, no First Prize was awarded that year (Colchie 2001). His writings and openly gay lifestyle were, by 1967, bringing him into conflict with the Communist government. He left the Biblioteca Nacional and became an editor for the Cuban Book Institute until 1968. From 1968 to 1974 he was a journalist and editor for the literary magazine La Gaceta de Cuba. In 1973, he was sent to prison after being charged and convicted of ‘ideological deviation’ and for publishing abroad without official consent. He escaped from prison and tried to leave Cuba by launching himself from the shore on a tire inner tube. The attempt failed and he was rearrested near Lenin Park and imprisoned at the notorious El Morro Castle alongside murderers and rapists. He survived by helping the inmates to write letters to wives and lovers. He was able to collect enough paper this way to continue his writing. However, his attempts to smuggle his work out of prison were discovered and he was severely punished. Threatened with death, he was forced to renounce his work and was released in 1976. In 1980, as part of the Mariel Boatlift, he fled to the United States. Despite his short life and the hardships imposed during his imprisonment, Arenas produced a significant body of work. His Pentagonia is a set of five novels that comprise a ‘secret history’ of post revolutionary Cuba. It includes the poetical Farewell to the Sea, Palace of the White Skunks and the Rabelaisian Color of Summer. In these novels Arenas’ style ranges from a stark realist narrative to absurd satiric humor. He traces his own life story in what to him is the absurd world of Castro’s Cuba. In each of the novels Arenas himself is a major character, going by a number of pseudonyms. His autobiography, Before Night Falls was on the New York Times list of the ten best books of the year in 1993. In 2000 this work was made into a film, directed by Julian Schnabel, in which Arenas was played by Javier Bardem. In 1987, Arenas was diagnosed with AIDS, but he continued to write and speak out against the Cuban government. He mentored many Cuban Exile writers, including John O’Donnell-Rosales. After battling AIDS, Arenas committed suicide by taking an overdose of drugs and alcohol on December 7, 1990, in New York. In a suicide letter written for publication, Arenas wrote: ‘Due to my delicate state of health and to the terrible depression it causes me not to be able to continue writing and struggling for the freedom of Cuba, I am ending my life. I want to encourage the Cuban people out of the country as well as on the Island to continue fighting for freedom. Cuba will be free. I already am.’
Arenas, Reinaldo. Farewell To the Sea. New York. 1985. Viking Press. 0670529605. Translated from the Spanish by Andrew Hurley. 413 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Neil Stuart. Illustration on front of jacket by Marguerita Bornstein.

Sixteen years ago, Reinaldo Arenas began writing FAREWELL TO THE SEA, a novel that Severo Sarduy describes as ‘one of the greatest novels that our country has produced, at once one of the most critical and one of the most Cuban.’ The manuscript was confiscated twice by the Cuban authorities, and twice the author rewrote it from memory In this extraordinary and deeply shocking novel we meet Hector, a disillusioned poet and disenchanted revolutionary who leaves the dreariness of Havana and retreats with his wife and baby to a small seaside cabin for six days. There they hope to recapture the passion, desire, and carefree spirit that once united them. In a stunning juxtaposition of narrative voices, they each tell their own story. The wife (nameless throughout) speaks first: of the child she must care for; of a life filled with paranoia; of the emptiness of religion; of a marriage disrupted by curious sexual tensions and unacknowledged infidelities. Hector then recalls the valiant struggle against Batista, the promise of the early Castro years, the disillusionment that came afterward - and laments the artistic and sexual freedom (the ability to live openly as a homosexual) that has been denied him. Rich in hallucination, myth, and fantasy FAREWELL TO THE SEA is a brilliant apocalyptic vision of today’s Cuba, by a writer whom Octavio Paz calls ‘remarkable.’

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government. Arenas was born in the countryside, in the northern part of the Province of Oriente, Cuba, and later moved to the city of Holguín. In 1963, he moved to Havana to enroll in the School of Planification and, later, in the Faculty of Letters at the Universidad de La Habana, where he studied philosophy and literature without completing a degree. The following year, he began working at the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí. While there, his talent was noticed and he was awarded prizes at Cirilo Villaverde National Competition held by UNEAC (National Union of Cuban Writers and Artists). (Soto 1998) Interestingly, his Hallucinations was awarded ‘first Honorable Mention’ in 1966 although, as the judges could find no better entry, no First Prize was awarded that year (Colchie 2001). His writings and openly gay lifestyle were, by 1967, bringing him into conflict with the Communist government. He left the Biblioteca Nacional and became an editor for the Cuban Book Institute until 1968. From 1968 to 1974 he was a journalist and editor for the literary magazine La Gaceta de Cuba. In 1973, he was sent to prison after being charged and convicted of ‘ideological deviation’ and for publishing abroad without official consent. He escaped from prison and tried to leave Cuba by launching himself from the shore on a tire inner tube. The attempt failed and he was rearrested near Lenin Park and imprisoned at the notorious El Morro Castle alongside murderers and rapists. He survived by helping the inmates to write letters to wives and lovers. He was able to collect enough paper this way to continue his writing. However, his attempts to smuggle his work out of prison were discovered and he was severely punished. Threatened with death, he was forced to renounce his work and was released in 1976. In 1980, as part of the Mariel Boatlift, he fled to the United States. Despite his short life and the hardships imposed during his imprisonment, Arenas produced a significant body of work. His Pentagonia is a set of five novels that comprise a ‘secret history’ of post revolutionary Cuba. It includes the poetical Farewell to the Sea, Palace of the White Skunks and the Rabelaisian Color of Summer. In these novels Arenas’ style ranges from a stark realist narrative to absurd satiric humor. He traces his own life story in what to him is the absurd world of Castro’s Cuba. In each of the novels Arenas himself is a major character, going by a number of pseudonyms. His autobiography, Before Night Falls was on the New York Times list of the ten best books of the year in 1993. In 2000 this work was made into a film, directed by Julian Schnabel, in which Arenas was played by Javier Bardem. In 1987, Arenas was diagnosed with AIDS, but he continued to write and speak out against the Cuban government. He mentored many Cuban Exile writers, including John O’Donnell-Rosales. After battling AIDS, Arenas committed suicide by taking an overdose of drugs and alcohol on December 7, 1990, in New York. In a suicide letter written for publication, Arenas wrote: ‘Due to my delicate state of health and to the terrible depression it causes me not to be able to continue writing and struggling for the freedom of Cuba, I am ending my life. I want to encourage the Cuban people out of the country as well as on the Island to continue fighting for freedom. Cuba will be free. I already am.’. ANDREW HURLEY is a professor of English at the University of Puerto Rico at San Juan. He has translated works of Jorge Luis Borges and Heberto Padilla, and is at work on the translation of Cantando en el pow. (original title: Otra Vez El Mar, 1982 - Editorial Argos Vergara, S.A.).
Arenas, Reinaldo. Graveyard of the Angels. New York. 1987. Avon. 0380750759. Paperback Original. Translated from the Spanish by Alfred J. MacAdam. 122 pages. paperback.

‘A GREAT LOVE IS, ABOVE ALL, A GREAT PROVOCATION . . . ‘ A beautiful young mulatto in long-ago Havana, Cuba, takes a white man into her bed. In itself, this act of love was more commonplace than remarkable. But Cecilia Valdés was the illegitimate daughter of don Cándido, a wealthy slave trader arid coffee baron. Her inamorato was Leonardo, don Cándido’s son. Such can be the stuff of tragedy. For highly acclaimed exiled Cuban writer Reinaldo Arenas, it is the jumping-off place for hilarious farce-risque, absurd, wildly funny, and quintessentially irreverent. Arenas, whose searing prose has exposed the brutalities and haunting beauty of his native land in his earlier works, tells here a tale filled with heartbreak; touches it with magic; and creates a fantastic, bittersweet tragicomedy that captures the essence of the bondage of the human heart. ‘A remarkable writer as much for his talent as for his intellectual dignity. I am his reader and his admirer!’ - Octavio Paz.

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government. Arenas was born in the countryside, in the northern part of the Province of Oriente, Cuba, and later moved to the city of Holguín. In 1963, he moved to Havana to enroll in the School of Planification and, later, in the Faculty of Letters at the Universidad de La Habana, where he studied philosophy and literature without completing a degree. The following year, he began working at the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí. While there, his talent was noticed and he was awarded prizes at Cirilo Villaverde National Competition held by UNEAC (National Union of Cuban Writers and Artists). (Soto 1998) Interestingly, his Hallucinations was awarded ‘first Honorable Mention’ in 1966 although, as the judges could find no better entry, no First Prize was awarded that year (Colchie 2001). His writings and openly gay lifestyle were, by 1967, bringing him into conflict with the Communist government. He left the Biblioteca Nacional and became an editor for the Cuban Book Institute until 1968. From 1968 to 1974 he was a journalist and editor for the literary magazine La Gaceta de Cuba. In 1973, he was sent to prison after being charged and convicted of ‘ideological deviation’ and for publishing abroad without official consent. He escaped from prison and tried to leave Cuba by launching himself from the shore on a tire inner tube. The attempt failed and he was rearrested near Lenin Park and imprisoned at the notorious El Morro Castle alongside murderers and rapists. He survived by helping the inmates to write letters to wives and lovers. He was able to collect enough paper this way to continue his writing. However, his attempts to smuggle his work out of prison were discovered and he was severely punished. Threatened with death, he was forced to renounce his work and was released in 1976. In 1980, as part of the Mariel Boatlift, he fled to the United States. Despite his short life and the hardships imposed during his imprisonment, Arenas produced a significant body of work. His Pentagonia is a set of five novels that comprise a ‘secret history’ of post revolutionary Cuba. It includes the poetical Farewell to the Sea, Palace of the White Skunks and the Rabelaisian Color of Summer. In these novels Arenas’ style ranges from a stark realist narrative to absurd satiric humor. He traces his own life story in what to him is the absurd world of Castro’s Cuba. In each of the novels Arenas himself is a major character, going by a number of pseudonyms. His autobiography, Before Night Falls was on the New York Times list of the ten best books of the year in 1993. In 2000 this work was made into a film, directed by Julian Schnabel, in which Arenas was played by Javier Bardem. In 1987, Arenas was diagnosed with AIDS, but he continued to write and speak out against the Cuban government. He mentored many Cuban Exile writers, including John O’Donnell-Rosales. After battling AIDS, Arenas committed suicide by taking an overdose of drugs and alcohol on December 7, 1990, in New York. In a suicide letter written for publication, Arenas wrote: ‘Due to my delicate state of health and to the terrible depression it causes me not to be able to continue writing and struggling for the freedom of Cuba, I am ending my life. I want to encourage the Cuban people out of the country as well as on the Island to continue fighting for freedom. Cuba will be free. I already am.’
Arenas, Reinaldo. Hallucinations. London. 1971. Jonathan Cape. 0224005081. Translated from the Spanish by Gordon Brotherston. 287 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Bill Botten

Reinaldo Arenas, at twenty-seven, became one of the most powerful writers in Cuba and, indeed, Latin America. This novel (El mundo alucinante) is the hallucinatory history of Friar Servando Teresa de Mier, a Mexican friar whose famous heretical sermon on the apparition of Our Lady of Guadalupe (now seen as an outburst of the passion which led to the independence of Mexico early in the nineteenth century) resulted in his lifelong persecution. Ingeniously merging fact and fantasy, the novel records the friar’s wildly improbable exploits as he escapes from prison to prison, narrowly avoiding immolation, rape and marriage, travelling Europe on foot, a witness to the excesses of debauched clerics and corrupt revolutionaries. He voyages in the three lands of love in Madrid, is caged by a wealthy jewess in Bayonne, witnesses the triumph of Napoleon in Paris, meets Lady Hamilton and Virginia Woolf’s hermaphrodite Orlando in England’s ‘remote and misty land’, picks cotton in the American South and flnally returns to applause and welcome in newly liberated Mexico, Whether incarcerated in spray-drenched castle, slave ship or rat-infested dungeon, or wandering the labyrinth of vice and deceit in a worlc of changing tyrannies, the intrepid friar retains his faith and chastity, holding fast to his obsessively utopian vision of a truly free society. The hypnotic pace and imaginative brilliance of this fantastic tale have already won acclaim in France and Mexico, although its disenchanted view of revolution has so far precluded publication in the author’s native Cuba, Gordon Brotherston’s distinguished translation highlights all the humour, vigour and sparkling invention of the original.

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government. Arenas was born in the countryside, in the northern part of the Province of Oriente, Cuba, and later moved to the city of Holguín. In 1963, he moved to Havana to enroll in the School of Planification and, later, in the Faculty of Letters at the Universidad de La Habana, where he studied philosophy and literature without completing a degree. The following year, he began working at the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí. While there, his talent was noticed and he was awarded prizes at Cirilo Villaverde National Competition held by UNEAC (National Union of Cuban Writers and Artists). (Soto 1998) Interestingly, his Hallucinations was awarded ‘first Honorable Mention’ in 1966 although, as the judges could find no better entry, no First Prize was awarded that year (Colchie 2001). His writings and openly gay lifestyle were, by 1967, bringing him into conflict with the Communist government. He left the Biblioteca Nacional and became an editor for the Cuban Book Institute until 1968. From 1968 to 1974 he was a journalist and editor for the literary magazine La Gaceta de Cuba. In 1973, he was sent to prison after being charged and convicted of ‘ideological deviation’ and for publishing abroad without official consent. He escaped from prison and tried to leave Cuba by launching himself from the shore on a tire inner tube. The attempt failed and he was rearrested near Lenin Park and imprisoned at the notorious El Morro Castle alongside murderers and rapists. He survived by helping the inmates to write letters to wives and lovers. He was able to collect enough paper this way to continue his writing. However, his attempts to smuggle his work out of prison were discovered and he was severely punished. Threatened with death, he was forced to renounce his work and was released in 1976. In 1980, as part of the Mariel Boatlift, he fled to the United States. Despite his short life and the hardships imposed during his imprisonment, Arenas produced a significant body of work. His Pentagonia is a set of five novels that comprise a ‘secret history’ of post revolutionary Cuba. It includes the poetical Farewell to the Sea, Palace of the White Skunks and the Rabelaisian Color of Summer. In these novels Arenas’ style ranges from a stark realist narrative to absurd satiric humor. He traces his own life story in what to him is the absurd world of Castro’s Cuba. In each of the novels Arenas himself is a major character, going by a number of pseudonyms. His autobiography, Before Night Falls was on the New York Times list of the ten best books of the year in 1993. In 2000 this work was made into a film, directed by Julian Schnabel, in which Arenas was played by Javier Bardem. In 1987, Arenas was diagnosed with AIDS, but he continued to write and speak out against the Cuban government. He mentored many Cuban Exile writers, including John O’Donnell-Rosales. After battling AIDS, Arenas committed suicide by taking an overdose of drugs and alcohol on December 7, 1990, in New York. In a suicide letter written for publication, Arenas wrote: ‘Due to my delicate state of health and to the terrible depression it causes me not to be able to continue writing and struggling for the freedom of Cuba, I am ending my life. I want to encourage the Cuban people out of the country as well as on the Island to continue fighting for freedom. Cuba will be free. I already am.’
Arenas, Reinaldo. Hallucinations. New York. 1971. Harper & Row. 0060101245. Translated from the Spanish by Gordon Brotherston. 287 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Bill Botten

This inventive, spirited and hilarious novel is imaginary biography, philosophical fable, historical fresco and political parable. A blend of the serious and the burlesque, surreal truth and invention, it is the story of Friar Servando Teresa de Mier, a Mexican friar whose famous heretical sermon on the apparition of Our Lady of Guadalupe (now seen as an outburst of the passion which led to the independence of Mexico early in the nineteenth century) resulted in his lifelong persecution. Ingeniously merging fact and fantasy, the novel records the friar’s wildly improbable exploits as he escapes from prison to prison, narrowly avoiding immolation, rape and marriage, traveling Europe on foot, a witness to the excesses of debauched clerics and corrupt revolutionaries. He voyages in the three lands of love in Madrid, is caged by a wealthy Jewess in Bayonne, witnesses the triumph of Napoleon in Paris, meets Lady Hamilton and Virginia Woolf’s hermaphrodite, Orlando, in England’s ‘remote and misty land,’ picks cotton in the American south and finally returns to applause and welcome in newly liberated Mexico. Whether incarcerated in spray-drenched castle, slave ship or rat-infested dungeon, or wandering the labyrinth of vice and deceit in a world of changing tyrannies, the intrepid friar retains his faith and chastity, holding fast to his obsessively utopian vision of a truly free society. The pace and brilliance of this picaresque tale have already won acclaim in France and Mexico, although its disenchanted view of revolution has so far precluded publication in the author’s native Cuba. Gordon Brotherston’s distinguished translation highlights all the humor, vigor and sparkling adventure of the original.

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government. Arenas was born in the countryside, in the northern part of the Province of Oriente, Cuba, and later moved to the city of Holguín. In 1963, he moved to Havana to enroll in the School of Planification and, later, in the Faculty of Letters at the Universidad de La Habana, where he studied philosophy and literature without completing a degree. The following year, he began working at the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí. While there, his talent was noticed and he was awarded prizes at Cirilo Villaverde National Competition held by UNEAC (National Union of Cuban Writers and Artists). (Soto 1998) Interestingly, his Hallucinations was awarded ‘first Honorable Mention’ in 1966 although, as the judges could find no better entry, no First Prize was awarded that year (Colchie 2001). His writings and openly gay lifestyle were, by 1967, bringing him into conflict with the Communist government. He left the Biblioteca Nacional and became an editor for the Cuban Book Institute until 1968. From 1968 to 1974 he was a journalist and editor for the literary magazine La Gaceta de Cuba. In 1973, he was sent to prison after being charged and convicted of ‘ideological deviation’ and for publishing abroad without official consent. He escaped from prison and tried to leave Cuba by launching himself from the shore on a tire inner tube. The attempt failed and he was rearrested near Lenin Park and imprisoned at the notorious El Morro Castle alongside murderers and rapists. He survived by helping the inmates to write letters to wives and lovers. He was able to collect enough paper this way to continue his writing. However, his attempts to smuggle his work out of prison were discovered and he was severely punished. Threatened with death, he was forced to renounce his work and was released in 1976. In 1980, as part of the Mariel Boatlift, he fled to the United States. Despite his short life and the hardships imposed during his imprisonment, Arenas produced a significant body of work. His Pentagonia is a set of five novels that comprise a ‘secret history’ of post revolutionary Cuba. It includes the poetical Farewell to the Sea, Palace of the White Skunks and the Rabelaisian Color of Summer. In these novels Arenas’ style ranges from a stark realist narrative to absurd satiric humor. He traces his own life story in what to him is the absurd world of Castro’s Cuba. In each of the novels Arenas himself is a major character, going by a number of pseudonyms. His autobiography, Before Night Falls was on the New York Times list of the ten best books of the year in 1993. In 2000 this work was made into a film, directed by Julian Schnabel, in which Arenas was played by Javier Bardem. In 1987, Arenas was diagnosed with AIDS, but he continued to write and speak out against the Cuban government. He mentored many Cuban Exile writers, including John O’Donnell-Rosales. After battling AIDS, Arenas committed suicide by taking an overdose of drugs and alcohol on December 7, 1990, in New York. In a suicide letter written for publication, Arenas wrote: ‘Due to my delicate state of health and to the terrible depression it causes me not to be able to continue writing and struggling for the freedom of Cuba, I am ending my life. I want to encourage the Cuban people out of the country as well as on the Island to continue fighting for freedom. Cuba will be free. I already am.’
Arenas, Reinaldo. Hallucinations: Being an Account of the Life and Adventures of Frair Servando Teresa de Mier. Harmondsworth, England. 1976. Penguin. 0140038957. Translated by Gordon Brotherston. Orignially published in 1971. 255 pages. paperback.

This inventive, spirited and hilarious novel is imaginary biography, philosophical fable, historical fresco and political parable. A blend of the serious and the burlesque, surreal truth and invention, it is the story of Friar Servando Teresa de Mier, a Mexican friar whose famous heretical sermon on the apparition of Our Lady of Guadalupe (now seen as an outburst of the passion which led to the independence of Mexico early in the nineteenth century) resulted in his lifelong persecution. Ingeniously merging fact and fantasy, the novel records the friar’s wildly improbable exploits as he escapes from prison to prison, narrowly avoiding immolation, rape and marriage, traveling Europe on foot, a witness to the excesses of debauched clerics and corrupt revolutionaries. He voyages in the three lands of love in Madrid, is caged by a wealthy Jewess in Bayonne, witnesses the triumph of Napoleon in Paris, meets Lady Hamilton and Virginia Woolf’s hermaphrodite, Orlando, in England’s ‘remote and misty land,’ picks cotton in the American south and finally returns to applause and welcome in newly liberated Mexico. Whether incarcerated in spray-drenched castle, slave ship or rat-infested dungeon, or wandering the labyrinth of vice and deceit in a world of changing tyrannies, the intrepid friar retains his faith and chastity, holding fast to his obsessively utopian vision of a truly free society. The pace and brilliance of this picaresque tale have already won acclaim in France and Mexico, although its disenchanted view of revolution has so far precluded publication in the author’s native Cuba. Gordon Brotherston’s distinguished translation highlights all the humor, vigor and sparkling adventure of the original.

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government. Arenas was born in the countryside, in the northern part of the Province of Oriente, Cuba, and later moved to the city of Holguín. In 1963, he moved to Havana to enroll in the School of Planification and, later, in the Faculty of Letters at the Universidad de La Habana, where he studied philosophy and literature without completing a degree. The following year, he began working at the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí. While there, his talent was noticed and he was awarded prizes at Cirilo Villaverde National Competition held by UNEAC (National Union of Cuban Writers and Artists). (Soto 1998) Interestingly, his Hallucinations was awarded ‘first Honorable Mention’ in 1966 although, as the judges could find no better entry, no First Prize was awarded that year (Colchie 2001). His writings and openly gay lifestyle were, by 1967, bringing him into conflict with the Communist government. He left the Biblioteca Nacional and became an editor for the Cuban Book Institute until 1968. From 1968 to 1974 he was a journalist and editor for the literary magazine La Gaceta de Cuba. In 1973, he was sent to prison after being charged and convicted of ‘ideological deviation’ and for publishing abroad without official consent. He escaped from prison and tried to leave Cuba by launching himself from the shore on a tire inner tube. The attempt failed and he was rearrested near Lenin Park and imprisoned at the notorious El Morro Castle alongside murderers and rapists. He survived by helping the inmates to write letters to wives and lovers. He was able to collect enough paper this way to continue his writing. However, his attempts to smuggle his work out of prison were discovered and he was severely punished. Threatened with death, he was forced to renounce his work and was released in 1976. In 1980, as part of the Mariel Boatlift, he fled to the United States. Despite his short life and the hardships imposed during his imprisonment, Arenas produced a significant body of work. His Pentagonia is a set of five novels that comprise a ‘secret history’ of post revolutionary Cuba. It includes the poetical Farewell to the Sea, Palace of the White Skunks and the Rabelaisian Color of Summer. In these novels Arenas’ style ranges from a stark realist narrative to absurd satiric humor. He traces his own life story in what to him is the absurd world of Castro’s Cuba. In each of the novels Arenas himself is a major character, going by a number of pseudonyms. His autobiography, Before Night Falls was on the New York Times list of the ten best books of the year in 1993. In 2000 this work was made into a film, directed by Julian Schnabel, in which Arenas was played by Javier Bardem. In 1987, Arenas was diagnosed with AIDS, but he continued to write and speak out against the Cuban government. He mentored many Cuban Exile writers, including John O’Donnell-Rosales. After battling AIDS, Arenas committed suicide by taking an overdose of drugs and alcohol on December 7, 1990, in New York. In a suicide letter written for publication, Arenas wrote: ‘Due to my delicate state of health and to the terrible depression it causes me not to be able to continue writing and struggling for the freedom of Cuba, I am ending my life. I want to encourage the Cuban people out of the country as well as on the Island to continue fighting for freedom. Cuba will be free. I already am.’
Arenas, Reinaldo. Old Rosa: A Novel in Two Stories. New York. 1989. Grove Press. 0802110924. Translated from the Spanish by Ann Tashi Slater & Andrew Hurley. 106 pages. hardcover. Cover: Bascove. Author photograph by Lizaro C. Carriles

The two stories of this terrifying and beautiful novel converge on a single charged point in the lives of a Cuban mother and son. We first meet Old Rosa in the blazing ruins of her farmhouse, weeping tears that seem to have no beginning or end. As the fire spreads, her life passes before her, and we see her as a young woman, shy but firm in her chastity, then as a bride, mother, and mistress of her prosperous farm. Tall, proud, shrewd, she is always in control-of her husband, her children, her workers, her land, even her God. But when her oldest son runs off to join Fidel Castro’s rebels, her world begins to crumble, and when she finds her youngest son, Arturo, her favorite, her ‘brightest star,’ in bed with another boy, her despair burns more fiercely than the encroaching flames that drive this powerful story from present to past and back again. The second story, ‘The Brightest Star,’ finds this son imprisoned in one of Castro’s camps for homosexuals, where his life is unrelieved, mind-numbing labor and brutality. To survive, Arturo writes, on anything he can find, on paper bags and torn-off scraps of political posters and in the margins of stolen official documents. He writes to open a window of freedom, to preserve a dream of beauty and love, with such passion and soaring poetry that we can see the magnificent castles, the lush hanging gardens, the crystal palaces of his imagination - which always revolve, and dissolve, around the image of Old Rosa, their fateful confrontation, the house in flames, the charred body of his mother, the one who loved him enough to kill him.

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government.
Arenas, Reinaldo. Singing From the Well. New York. 1987. Viking Press. 0670808059. Translated from the Spanish by Andrew Hurley. 206 pages. hardcover. Cover: Marguerita Bornstein

SINGING FROM THE WELL is a powerful novel of growing up in a world where nightmare has become reality and fantasy provides the only escape. His mother piously talks of the heaven that awaits the good, and disciplines her son with an ox-prod. His grandmother burns his treasured crosses for kindling. His cousins meet on the rooftop of their home to plot their grandfather’s death. The children at school taunt him as a ninny, a ‘queer.’ Yet in the hills surrounding his home, another reality exists, a place where his mother wears flowers in her hair, and his cousin Celestino, a poet who inscribes verse on the trunks of trees, understands his every word and sees, unquestioning, his visions. In this extraordinary novel, by turns explosively crude and breathtakingly lyrical, Reinaldo Arenas uses the emotionally charged rage of childhood to express the horrors and the hopes of the revolutionary spirit raised against authority and oppression.

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government. Arenas was born in the countryside, in the northern part of the Province of Oriente, Cuba, and later moved to the city of Holguín. In 1963, he moved to Havana to enroll in the School of Planification and, later, in the Faculty of Letters at the Universidad de La Habana, where he studied philosophy and literature without completing a degree. The following year, he began working at the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí. While there, his talent was noticed and he was awarded prizes at Cirilo Villaverde National Competition held by UNEAC (National Union of Cuban Writers and Artists). (Soto 1998) Interestingly, his Hallucinations was awarded ‘first Honorable Mention’ in 1966 although, as the judges could find no better entry, no First Prize was awarded that year (Colchie 2001). His writings and openly gay lifestyle were, by 1967, bringing him into conflict with the Communist government. He left the Biblioteca Nacional and became an editor for the Cuban Book Institute until 1968. From 1968 to 1974 he was a journalist and editor for the literary magazine La Gaceta de Cuba. In 1973, he was sent to prison after being charged and convicted of ‘ideological deviation’ and for publishing abroad without official consent. He escaped from prison and tried to leave Cuba by launching himself from the shore on a tire inner tube. The attempt failed and he was rearrested near Lenin Park and imprisoned at the notorious El Morro Castle alongside murderers and rapists. He survived by helping the inmates to write letters to wives and lovers. He was able to collect enough paper this way to continue his writing. However, his attempts to smuggle his work out of prison were discovered and he was severely punished. Threatened with death, he was forced to renounce his work and was released in 1976. In 1980, as part of the Mariel Boatlift, he fled to the United States. Despite his short life and the hardships imposed during his imprisonment, Arenas produced a significant body of work. His Pentagonia is a set of five novels that comprise a ‘secret history’ of post revolutionary Cuba. It includes the poetical Farewell to the Sea, Palace of the White Skunks and the Rabelaisian Color of Summer. In these novels Arenas’ style ranges from a stark realist narrative to absurd satiric humor. He traces his own life story in what to him is the absurd world of Castro’s Cuba. In each of the novels Arenas himself is a major character, going by a number of pseudonyms. His autobiography, Before Night Falls was on the New York Times list of the ten best books of the year in 1993. In 2000 this work was made into a film, directed by Julian Schnabel, in which Arenas was played by Javier Bardem. In 1987, Arenas was diagnosed with AIDS, but he continued to write and speak out against the Cuban government. He mentored many Cuban Exile writers, including John O’Donnell-Rosales. After battling AIDS, Arenas committed suicide by taking an overdose of drugs and alcohol on December 7, 1990, in New York. In a suicide letter written for publication, Arenas wrote: ‘Due to my delicate state of health and to the terrible depression it causes me not to be able to continue writing and struggling for the freedom of Cuba, I am ending my life. I want to encourage the Cuban people out of the country as well as on the Island to continue fighting for freedom. Cuba will be free. I already am.’ ANDREW HURLEY is a professor of English at the University of Puerto Rico, in San Juan. He has translated works of Jorge Luis Borges and Heberto Padilla, and is at work on the translation of El Palacio de las Blanquisinias Mofetas, the second book in the sequence.
Arenas, Reinaldo. The Assault. New York. 1994. Viking Press. 0670840661. Translated from the Spanish by Andrew Hurley. 146 pages. hardcover. JACKET DESIGN BY ROBIN LOCKE MONDA. JACKET ILLUSTRATION BY BARBARA E. COHEN.

The author of the brilliant and highly acclaimed memoir, BEFORE NIGHT FALLS, Reinaldo Arenas concluded his sequence of five novels - at once a ‘secret history of Cuba’ and a writer’s autobiography - with an allegorical satire. In The Assault, he paints a harrowing, yet at times boldly entertaining, Kafkaesque picture of a dehumanized people and the despair of an observer/narrator himself clinging to sanity. This profane narrative, filled with righteous rage, takes us on a surreal journey through a blackly humorous shadowland where philosophical discussion, homosexuality, and forgetting the words to heroic anthems are comparable crimes-and a cockroach hunt makes a national holiday. With echoes of Rabelais, Swift, Orwell, and the films of Luis Buñuel, The Assault crowns the work of one of the most visionary writers to have emerged from Castro’s Cuba, a writer whom Octavio Paz called ‘remarkable . . . as much for his intellectual dignity as for his talent.’

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government. Arenas was born in the countryside, in the northern part of the Province of Oriente, Cuba, and later moved to the city of Holguín. In 1963, he moved to Havana to enroll in the School of Planification and, later, in the Faculty of Letters at the Universidad de La Habana, where he studied philosophy and literature without completing a degree. The following year, he began working at the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí. While there, his talent was noticed and he was awarded prizes at Cirilo Villaverde National Competition held by UNEAC (National Union of Cuban Writers and Artists). (Soto 1998) Interestingly, his Hallucinations was awarded ‘first Honorable Mention’ in 1966 although, as the judges could find no better entry, no First Prize was awarded that year (Colchie 2001). His writings and openly gay lifestyle were, by 1967, bringing him into conflict with the Communist government. He left the Biblioteca Nacional and became an editor for the Cuban Book Institute until 1968. From 1968 to 1974 he was a journalist and editor for the literary magazine La Gaceta de Cuba. In 1973, he was sent to prison after being charged and convicted of ‘ideological deviation’ and for publishing abroad without official consent. He escaped from prison and tried to leave Cuba by launching himself from the shore on a tire inner tube. The attempt failed and he was rearrested near Lenin Park and imprisoned at the notorious El Morro Castle alongside murderers and rapists. He survived by helping the inmates to write letters to wives and lovers. He was able to collect enough paper this way to continue his writing. However, his attempts to smuggle his work out of prison were discovered and he was severely punished. Threatened with death, he was forced to renounce his work and was released in 1976. In 1980, as part of the Mariel Boatlift, he fled to the United States. Despite his short life and the hardships imposed during his imprisonment, Arenas produced a significant body of work. His Pentagonia is a set of five novels that comprise a ‘secret history’ of post revolutionary Cuba. It includes the poetical Farewell to the Sea, Palace of the White Skunks and the Rabelaisian Color of Summer. In these novels Arenas’ style ranges from a stark realist narrative to absurd satiric humor. He traces his own life story in what to him is the absurd world of Castro’s Cuba. In each of the novels Arenas himself is a major character, going by a number of pseudonyms. His autobiography, Before Night Falls was on the New York Times list of the ten best books of the year in 1993. In 2000 this work was made into a film, directed by Julian Schnabel, in which Arenas was played by Javier Bardem. In 1987, Arenas was diagnosed with AIDS, but he continued to write and speak out against the Cuban government. He mentored many Cuban Exile writers, including John O’Donnell-Rosales. After battling AIDS, Arenas committed suicide by taking an overdose of drugs and alcohol on December 7, 1990, in New York. In a suicide letter written for publication, Arenas wrote: ‘Due to my delicate state of health and to the terrible depression it causes me not to be able to continue writing and struggling for the freedom of Cuba, I am ending my life. . . . I want to encourage the Cuban people out of the country as well as on the Island to continue fighting for freedom. . . Cuba will be free. I already am.’ ANDREW HURLEY is Professor of English at the University of Puerto Rico in San Juan. He has translated Reinaldo Arenas’s ‘Pentagonia’ novels and other writings by Arenas, as well as works by Jorge Lois Borges, Heberto Padilla, Gustavo Sainz, Ernesto Sabato, Fernando Arrabal, and the Puerto Rican writer Ana Lydia Vega.
Arenas, Reinaldo. The Color of Summer, or the New Garden of Earthly Delights. New York. 2000. Viking Press. 0670840653. Translated from the Spanish by Andrew Hurley. 417 pages. hardcover. Jacket design: Evan Gaffney. Jacket photographs: (top) Alex Webb I Magnum; (bottom) Tria Giovan/Swanstock.

The final work from ‘one of the few truly great writers to come out of Latin America in this century’ (Chicago Tribune). Critics worldwide have praised Reinaldo Arenas’s writing. His extraordinary memoir, BEFORE NIGHT FALLS, was chosen by the editors of The New York Times Book Review as one of the fourteen ‘Best Books of 1993’ and was hailed by Mario Vargas Llosa as ‘one of the most shattering testimonials ever written.’ His fiction ‘reveals a profoundly original writer . . . Reading Arenas is like witnessing a bare consciousness in the process of assimilating the most universal, but powerful, human experiences and turning them into literature’ (The New York Tmes Book Review). THE COLOR OF SUMMER, Arenas’s finest comic achievement, is the fourth novel in a quintet he called the Pentagonia. Although it is the penultimate chapter in his ‘secret history of Cuba,’ it was, in fact, the last book Arenas wrote before his death in 1990. (The final volume, THE ASSAULT, was written first and published in 1994.) In THE COLOR OF SUMMER we are transported to a carnival held in honor of the fiftieth year in power of a certain Caribbean dictator, named Fifo. The citizens have ‘come out’- both literally and figuratively-to celebrate, and the result is a hilarious inversion of the island’s power structure and social order. A Rabelaisian tale of survival by wits and wit, The Color of Summer is ultimately a powerful and passionate story about the triumph of the human spirit over the forces of political and sexual repression.

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government. Arenas was born in the countryside, in the northern part of the Province of Oriente, Cuba, and later moved to the city of Holguín. In 1963, he moved to Havana to enroll in the School of Planification and, later, in the Faculty of Letters at the Universidad de La Habana, where he studied philosophy and literature without completing a degree. The following year, he began working at the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí. While there, his talent was noticed and he was awarded prizes at Cirilo Villaverde National Competition held by UNEAC (National Union of Cuban Writers and Artists). (Soto 1998) Interestingly, his Hallucinations was awarded ‘first Honorable Mention’ in 1966 although, as the judges could find no better entry, no First Prize was awarded that year (Colchie 2001). His writings and openly gay lifestyle were, by 1967, bringing him into conflict with the Communist government. He left the Biblioteca Nacional and became an editor for the Cuban Book Institute until 1968. From 1968 to 1974 he was a journalist and editor for the literary magazine La Gaceta de Cuba. In 1973, he was sent to prison after being charged and convicted of ‘ideological deviation’ and for publishing abroad without official consent. He escaped from prison and tried to leave Cuba by launching himself from the shore on a tire inner tube. The attempt failed and he was rearrested near Lenin Park and imprisoned at the notorious El Morro Castle alongside murderers and rapists. He survived by helping the inmates to write letters to wives and lovers. He was able to collect enough paper this way to continue his writing. However, his attempts to smuggle his work out of prison were discovered and he was severely punished. Threatened with death, he was forced to renounce his work and was released in 1976. In 1980, as part of the Mariel Boatlift, he fled to the United States. Despite his short life and the hardships imposed during his imprisonment, Arenas produced a significant body of work. His Pentagonia is a set of five novels that comprise a ‘secret history’ of post revolutionary Cuba. It includes the poetical Farewell to the Sea, Palace of the White Skunks and the Rabelaisian Color of Summer. In these novels Arenas’ style ranges from a stark realist narrative to absurd satiric humor. He traces his own life story in what to him is the absurd world of Castro’s Cuba. In each of the novels Arenas himself is a major character, going by a number of pseudonyms. His autobiography, Before Night Falls was on the New York Times list of the ten best books of the year in 1993. In 2000 this work was made into a film, directed by Julian Schnabel, in which Arenas was played by Javier Bardem. In 1987, Arenas was diagnosed with AIDS, but he continued to write and speak out against the Cuban government. He mentored many Cuban Exile writers, including John O’Donnell-Rosales. After battling AIDS, Arenas committed suicide by taking an overdose of drugs and alcohol on December 7, 1990, in New York. In a suicide letter written for publication, Arenas wrote: ‘Due to my delicate state of health and to the terrible depression it causes me not to be able to continue writing and struggling for the freedom of Cuba, I am ending my life. . . . I want to encourage the Cuban people out of the country as well as on the Island to continue fighting for freedom. . . Cuba will be free. I already am.’ ANDREW HURLEY is a professor of English at the University of Puerto Rico in San Juan. He has translated all of the novels in Arenas’s Pentagonia, and is also the translator of Jorge Luis Borges’s Collected Fictions.
Arenas, Reinaldo. The Doorman. New York. 1991. Grove Weidenfeld. 0802111092. Translated from the Spanish by Dolores M. Koch. 193 pages. hardcover. Cover: Bascove

Reinaido Arenas is the most widely read, most highly acclaimed writer of Cuba’s post-revolutionary generation. For his earlier works, such as SINGING FROM THE WELL (which he wrote when he was twenty-three) and Old Rosa, Arenas was praised as a prodigious, explosive talent. THE DOORMAN, his first work set in the United States, breaks new ground with the extraordinary and tragic story of Juan, a young Cuban refugee who becomes a doorman at a luxury apartment building in Manhattan. In his impeccable uniform, Juan opens the door fix a variety of characters, among them the Supreme Pastor of the Church of Love of Christ Through Friendly and Constant Contact; a young woman hell-bent on suicide (with whom Juan is secretly in love); an advocate of the totally prosthetic body; a pair of nearly identical gay lovers both named Oscar Times (but known as Oscar Times One and Oscar Times Evo); and a host of others whom Juan zealously endeavors to show ‘the true door to happiness?’ He fails miserably, but his own life takes a sudden turn when the tenants’ pets-including a bear, a rattlesnake, an orangutan, golden fish, cats, dogs, and so on - begin to talk to him. Not only do the animals talk to Juan, but they are in fact determined to recruit him to their cause: a revolt against humans and human society, and a mass flight to liberty. Fantastic, satirical, dizzyingly inventive, THE DOORMAN is a bittersweet parable about freedom and community, told with a profound sense of humanity.

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government.
Arenas, Reinaldo. The Ill-Fated Peregrinations of Fray Servando. New York. 1987. Avon/Bard. 0380750740. Newly Translated from the Spanish by Andrew Hurley. 246 pages. paperback.

Meet Father Servando Teresa de Mier, Catholic priest, Mexican revolutionary - and roguish hero of this wonderfully picaresque work by the acclaimed Cuban writer-in-exile, Reinaldo Arenas. A novel filled with linguistic pyrotechnics and dazzling leaps of the imagination, THE ILL-FATED PEREGRINATIONS OF FRAY SERVANDO continues the tradition of DON QUIXOTE, PANTAGRUEL, and CANDIDE, as the irrepressible priest wanders the vice-ridden capitals of Europe, slips in and out of jails, escapes the clutches of a marriage-minded female, and outwits bloodthirsty inquisitors, a slaveship captain, an American planter, and the King of Spain! Funny, irreverent, profound, this is literature at its quintessential best-a black comedy with the power to make readers question . . . and understand. A RABELAISIAN EXTRAVAGANZA . . . a steadily surprising and provocative book!’ - Atlantic Monthly Press. ‘A BAROQUE ALLEGORY OF THE ANGUISHED BUT NO LESS UNCOMPROMISING SPIRIT OF THE REVOLUTIONARY’ - New Statesman.

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government. Arenas was born in the countryside, in the northern part of the Province of Oriente, Cuba, and later moved to the city of Holguín. In 1963, he moved to Havana to enroll in the School of Planification and, later, in the Faculty of Letters at the Universidad de La Habana, where he studied philosophy and literature without completing a degree. The following year, he began working at the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí. While there, his talent was noticed and he was awarded prizes at Cirilo Villaverde National Competition held by UNEAC (National Union of Cuban Writers and Artists). (Soto 1998) Interestingly, his Hallucinations was awarded ‘first Honorable Mention’ in 1966 although, as the judges could find no better entry, no First Prize was awarded that year (Colchie 2001). His writings and openly gay lifestyle were, by 1967, bringing him into conflict with the Communist government. He left the Biblioteca Nacional and became an editor for the Cuban Book Institute until 1968. From 1968 to 1974 he was a journalist and editor for the literary magazine La Gaceta de Cuba. In 1973, he was sent to prison after being charged and convicted of ‘ideological deviation’ and for publishing abroad without official consent. He escaped from prison and tried to leave Cuba by launching himself from the shore on a tire inner tube. The attempt failed and he was rearrested near Lenin Park and imprisoned at the notorious El Morro Castle alongside murderers and rapists. He survived by helping the inmates to write letters to wives and lovers. He was able to collect enough paper this way to continue his writing. However, his attempts to smuggle his work out of prison were discovered and he was severely punished. Threatened with death, he was forced to renounce his work and was released in 1976. In 1980, as part of the Mariel Boatlift, he fled to the United States. Despite his short life and the hardships imposed during his imprisonment, Arenas produced a significant body of work. His Pentagonia is a set of five novels that comprise a ‘secret history’ of post revolutionary Cuba. It includes the poetical Farewell to the Sea, Palace of the White Skunks and the Rabelaisian Color of Summer. In these novels Arenas’ style ranges from a stark realist narrative to absurd satiric humor. He traces his own life story in what to him is the absurd world of Castro’s Cuba. In each of the novels Arenas himself is a major character, going by a number of pseudonyms. His autobiography, Before Night Falls was on the New York Times list of the ten best books of the year in 1993. In 2000 this work was made into a film, directed by Julian Schnabel, in which Arenas was played by Javier Bardem. In 1987, Arenas was diagnosed with AIDS, but he continued to write and speak out against the Cuban government. He mentored many Cuban Exile writers, including John O’Donnell-Rosales. After battling AIDS, Arenas committed suicide by taking an overdose of drugs and alcohol on December 7, 1990, in New York. In a suicide letter written for publication, Arenas wrote: ‘Due to my delicate state of health and to the terrible depression it causes me not to be able to continue writing and struggling for the freedom of Cuba, I am ending my life. . . . I want to encourage the Cuban people out of the country as well as on the Island to continue fighting for freedom. . . Cuba will be free. I already am.’. (original title: El mundo alucinante, 1966). A Re-Translation Of ‘Hallucinations’.
Arenas, Reinaldo. The Palace of the White Skunks. New York. 1991. Viking Press. 0670815101. Translated from the Spanish by Andrew Hurley. 356 pages. hardcover. Cover: Marguerita Bornstein

Reinaldo Arenas is one of the most intoxicating voices in modern Latin American letters today, and one of the most extraordinary writers Cuba has given us since Fidel Castro came to power in 1959. He has been described by Octavio Paz as ‘a remarkable writer as much for his talent as for his intellectual dignity,’ and by his fellow countrymen José Lezama Lima and Severo Sarduy as ‘a young Cuban writer of tremendous talent . . . a force of nature, someone born to write,’ and ‘one of the truly great writers our country has produced.’ Born into a peasant family in Oriente province, Arenas published his first novel, SINGING FROM THE WELL, in 1967 at the age of twenty-four. It was subsequently banned and Arenas has not been published in Cuba since. His second novel, HALLUCINATIONS, first published in Mexico, received enormous acclaim and was awarded, in 1969, joint first prize for best foreign novel of the year in France (an accolade he shared with Gabriel Garcia Marquez for ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE). Both books, written before Arenas was twenty-three, showed his ability to reimagine the awakening of adolescence and to re-create history on many levels of reality. They also alerted Cuban authorities to a ‘counter-revolutionary.’ From 1970 to 1980, when he managed to escape to Florida in the Mariel exodus, he spent time under house arrest, in labor camps, and in prison. Arenas continued to write, eluding Castro’s straitjacket and upsetting literary convention. For him, as for Jorge Luis Barges, there were no barriers between reality and fantasy. With the publication of Singing from the Well, his central theme of literary creation was firmly established. That book marked the beginning of a prodigious enterprise - a sequence of five novels which would be both ‘a secret history of Cuba’ and a writer’s autobiography. THE PALACE OF THE WHITE SKUNKS, the second volume of his quintet, tells the story of Fortunato, a young man who escapes the constant cruelties and cacophony of his grandparents’ home to join the rebel forces against the Batista regime. The story is narrated through a chorus of voices-of both the living and the dead-and through dialogue, monologue, advertisements, newspaper articles, and propaganda proclamations. It is a brilliant and disturbing portrait of Cuba as Castro prepared to take power and establish a new dictatorship, a period of Cuba’s history that Arenas eloquently describes in FAREWELL TO THE SEA, the third novel in the quintet.

Reinaldo Arenas (July 16, 1943 - December 7, 1990) was a Cuban poet, novelist, and playwright who despite his early sympathy for the 1959 revolution, grew critical of and then rebelled against the Cuban government. Arenas was born in the countryside, in the northern part of the Province of Oriente, Cuba, and later moved to the city of Holguín. In 1963, he moved to Havana to enroll in the School of Planification and, later, in the Faculty of Letters at the Universidad de La Habana, where he studied philosophy and literature without completing a degree. The following year, he began working at the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí. While there, his talent was noticed and he was awarded prizes at Cirilo Villaverde National Competition held by UNEAC (National Union of Cuban Writers and Artists). (Soto 1998) Interestingly, his Hallucinations was awarded ‘first Honorable Mention’ in 1966 although, as the judges could find no better entry, no First Prize was awarded that year (Colchie 2001). His writings and openly gay lifestyle were, by 1967, bringing him into conflict with the Communist government. He left the Biblioteca Nacional and became an editor for the Cuban Book Institute until 1968. From 1968 to 1974 he was a journalist and editor for the literary magazine La Gaceta de Cuba. In 1973, he was sent to prison after being charged and convicted of ‘ideological deviation’ and for publishing abroad without official consent. He escaped from prison and tried to leave Cuba by launching himself from the shore on a tire inner tube. The attempt failed and he was rearrested near Lenin Park and imprisoned at the notorious El Morro Castle alongside murderers and rapists. He survived by helping the inmates to write letters to wives and lovers. He was able to collect enough paper this way to continue his writing. However, his attempts to smuggle his work out of prison were discovered and he was severely punished. Threatened with death, he was forced to renounce his work and was released in 1976. In 1980, as part of the Mariel Boatlift, he fled to the United States. Despite his short life and the hardships imposed during his imprisonment, Arenas produced a significant body of work. His Pentagonia is a set of five novels that comprise a ‘secret history’ of post revolutionary Cuba. It includes the poetical Farewell to the Sea, Palace of the White Skunks and the Rabelaisian Color of Summer. In these novels Arenas’ style ranges from a stark realist narrative to absurd satiric humor. He traces his own life story in what to him is the absurd world of Castro’s Cuba. In each of the novels Arenas himself is a major character, going by a number of pseudonyms. His autobiography, Before Night Falls was on the New York Times list of the ten best books of the year in 1993. In 2000 this work was made into a film, directed by Julian Schnabel, in which Arenas was played by Javier Bardem. In 1987, Arenas was diagnosed with AIDS, but he continued to write and speak out against the Cuban government. He mentored many Cuban Exile writers, including John O’Donnell-Rosales. After battling AIDS, Arenas committed suicide by taking an overdose of drugs and alcohol on December 7, 1990, in New York. In a suicide letter written for publication, Arenas wrote: ‘Due to my delicate state of health and to the terrible depression it causes me not to be able to continue writing and struggling for the freedom of Cuba, I am ending my life. . . . I want to encourage the Cuban people out of the country as well as on the Island to continue fighting for freedom. . . Cuba will be free. I already am.’ ANDREW HURLEY is a professor of English at the University of Puerto Rico in San Juan. He has translated Singing from the Well and Farewell to the Sea and other writings by Reinaldo Arenas, as well as works by Jorge Luis Borges, Heberto Padilla, Gustavo Sainz, Ernesto Sábato, and Fernando Arrabal.
Arguedas, Jose Maria (Compiler). The Singing Mountaineers: Songs & Tales of the Quechua People. Austin. 1957. University Of Texas Press. Drawings by Donald Weismann. Edited & Introduced by Ruth Stephan. 204 pages. hardcover.

These are songs and tales of the Quechua people, the ‘singing mountaineers’ of Peru, the heirs of the Incas, for the first time made available to the English-speaking world in a book of genuine beauty and charm. Unique and unusual richness is the folklore of the Quechua people, but its treasures have long been hidden from the outside world, principally because Quechua is an unwritten language. Only in our own time has the barrier begun to be broken. One of the most important leaders in the movement to collect and record the folk heritage of the Quechua people is Jose Maria Arguedas, head of the Institute de Estudios Etnologicos del Museo Nacional de Historia, in Lima. It was a fortunate circumstance indeed which brought him several years ago into touch with the American novelist and poet, Ruth Stephan. Entranced by the beauty of the Andes, the nature of the Indians, and the haunting purity of the songs Arguedas had gathered, she resolved to present in English a collection of Quechua folk songs and tales. The result is the present volume. Presented herein are thirty songs, collected by Jose Maria Arguedas, translated from Quechua into Spanish by him, and given their final beautiful English form by Ruth Stephan. Here also are her English translations of two essays by Arguedas (one dealing with the Indians and their Andean fiestas and the other with their songs and tales) and of eleven ‘Threshing Songs,’ collected and translated into Spanish from Huanca, a Quechua dialect, by Maria Lourdes Valladares, a teacher of Angasmayo. The nine remarkable folk tales included were collected by Father Jorge A. Lira, translated into Spanish by Arguedas, and then into English by the noted translators Kate and Angel Flores. All this folklore came from the people of the Andean region near Cuzco, a people singularly untouched by outside influences, holding through the centuries to the customs and the character of the Incas, singing the same songs, telling the same tales. The whole has been edited by Ruth Stephan, who has supplied notes, a bibliography, and an introduction which admirably sets the scene for the songs and tales, with their background in which, ‘like brilliant steady stars, or, perhaps, like the mountains the Quechua people live upon, are the centuries of civilizations from which they have emerged. . . .’ Donald Weismann, head of the University of Texas Department of Art, who has long been interested in the folk art of the Americas, has supplied a series of delightful and appropriate drawings. . . A Tribute to The Singing Mountaineers BY DR. Luis E. VALCARCEL, Dean of the Faculty of Letters of the University of San Marco, Director of the Peruvian National Museum of History, President of the International Committee of Folklore, and author of numerous works on Peruvian history, ethnology, archaeology, and art - ‘We must be grateful to Ruth Stephan for having translated these songs of the Quechua people compiled by Jos4 Maria Arguedas, since it puts them within reach of the readers of the broad English-speaking world. ‘There will be revealed a poetry of profound humanity that overcomes misery and emits a radiance of the best that man has, that which is everlasting and universal, that which is not exclusive to a group nor the privilege of a race. In these songs the men of Peru, the towns of Peru, are joined with all men and all towns, because their motivation comes from the root of the species. They who sing the songs in this manner are the Peruvians of yesterday and of today; however, they are the ones who preserve in their spirit the unconfused Andean relationship, not those others who have lost it and flutter like loose leaves unfastened from the nourishing tree. ‘It is not vain to repeat that the more men may be bound to the earth, to their earth, the more universal will be their artistic expression. ‘In these pages will be found the proof.’. .

José María Arguedas Altamirano (18 January 1911 – 28 November 1969) was a Peruvian novelist, poet, and anthropologist. Arguedas was a mestizo of Spanish and Quechua descent who wrote novels, short stories, and poems in both Spanish and Quechua. Generally remembered as one of the most notable figures of 20th century Peruvian literature, Arguedas is especially recognized for his intimate portrayals of indigenous Andean culture. Key in his desire to depict indigenous expression and perspective more authentically was his creation of a new language that blended Spanish and Quechua and premiered in his debut novel Yawar Fiesta. Jose Maria Arguedas was born in Andahuaylas, a province in the southern Peruvian Andes. He was born into a well-off mestizo family, but his mother died when he was two years old. Because of the absence of his father, a lawyer who travelled frequently, and his bad relationship with his step-mother and step-brother, he comforted himself in the care of the family's indigenous servants, allowing him to immerse himself in the language and customs of the Andes, which came to form an important part of his personality. He went to primary school in San Juan de Lucana, Puquio, and Abancay, and completed his secondary studies in Ica, Huancayo, and Lima. He began studying at The University of San Marcos (Lima) in 1931; there he graduated with a degree in Literature. He later took up studies in Ethnology, receiving his degree in 1957 and his doctorate in 1963. Between 1937 and 1938 he was sent to prison for his protesting an envoy sent to Peru by Italian dictator Benito Mussolini. Arguedas also worked for the Ministry of Education, where he into practice his interests in preserving and promoting Peruvian culture, in particular traditional Andean music and dance. He was the director of the Casa de la Cultura (1963) and Director of the National Museum of History (1964–1966). Arguedas shot himself in the head on November 29, 1969 in his office at the Agrarian University in La Molina, leaving behind very specific instructions for his funeral, a diary depicting his depression, and a final unfinished manuscript, El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo (The Fox From Up Above and the Fox From Down Below). This work includes portions of Arguedas’ diary, memories of his distressing childhood, thoughts on Peruvian culture, and his reasons for suicide. He depicts his struggle between his desire to authentically illuminate the life of the Andean Indians and his personal anguish trapping him in depression. The title of the book originates in a Quechua myth that Arguedas translated into Spanish earlier in his life. ‘El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo’ refers to the Quechua symbols for life and death, and modernity and tradition. Arguedas began his literary career by writing short stories about the indigenous environment familiar to him from his childhood. He wrote in a Spanish highly influenced by Quechua syntax and vocabulary. By the time he published his first novel in 1941, Yawar Fiesta (‘Blood Festival’), he had begun to explore the theme that would interest him for the rest of his career: the clash between Western ‘civilization’ and the indigenous, ‘traditional’ way of life. He was thus considered part of the Indigenista movement in South American literature, and continued to explore this theme in his next two books Los Ríos Profundos (‘Deep Rivers’) (1958) and Todas las Sangres (1964). Yet he also was conscious of the simplistic portrayal of the indigenous peoples in other Indigenista literature and worked hard to give the Andean Indians a true voice in his works. This effort was not always successful as some critics contend that Arguedas portrayed Indian characters as too gentle and childlike. Another theme in Arguedas' writing is the struggle of mestizos of Indian-Spanish descent and their navigation between the two seemingly separate parts of their identity. Many of his works also depicted the violence and exploitation of race relations in Peru's small rural towns and haciendas, Arguedas was moderately optimistic about the possibility of a rapprochement between the forces of ‘tradition’ and the forces of ‘modernity’ until the 1960s, when he became more pessimistic. In his last (unfinished) work, El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo (‘The Fox From Up Above and the Fox From Down Below’) (1969), he abandoned the realism of his earlier works for a more postmodern approach. This novel expressed his despair, caused by his fear that the 'primitive' ways of the Indians could not survive the onslaught of modern technology and capitalism. At the same time that Arguedas was becoming more pessimistic about race relations in his country, younger indigenist intellectuals became increasingly militant, often criticizing his work in harsh terms for his poetic, romanticized treatment of indigenous and rural life.
Arguedas, Jose Maria. Deep Rivers. Austin. 1978. University Of Texas Press. 0292715161. Translated from the Spanish by Frances Horning Barraclough. Introduction by John V. Murra. Afterword by Mario Vargas Llosa. 248 pages. hardcover.

This powerful, poetic novel, set in the Peruvian Andes, has long resisted translation; its publication in English is truly a literary event. José Maria Arguedas draws upon his own Peruvian boyhood in portraying ‘the sad and powerful current that buflets children who must face, all alone, a world fraught with monsters and fire, and great rivers. Ernesto, the narrator of DEEP RIVERS, is a child with origins in two worlds. The son of a wandering country lawyer, he is brought up by Indian servants until he enters a Catholic boarding school at age 14. In this urban Spanish environment he is a misfit and a loner. The conflict of the Indian and the Spanish cultures is acted out within him as it was in the life of Arguedas. For the author, the final resolution was his suicide in 1969. For the boy Ernesto, salvation is his world of dreams and memories. The games, music, insects, and flowers of his Andean childhood are more vividly alive for Emesto than the disturbing world of the present. This nostalgia helps to explain the novel’s lyrical purity and its poetic, reminiscent tone. A major theme in Deep Rivers is the boy’s strong link with the natural world, which is humanized to an extent that surpasses simple metaphor and becomes almost magical. Two of the novel’s main episodes-the insurrection of the marketwomen and the suffering of the Indians during a typhus plague-involve conflict between the Indians and their Spanish masters. Ernesto observes these events, bewildered by the violence with which the two cultures clash. As Mario Vargas Llosa points out in the afterword, DEEP RIVERS records historical events and social problems at a personal level, ‘the only way literary testimony can be living and not crystallize into dead symbols.’ Texas Pan American Series. CONTENTS: TRANSLATOR’S NOTE; INTRODUCTION by John V. Mutra; THE OLD MAN; Deep rivers; THE LEAVE-TAKING; THE HACIENDA; BRIDGE OVER THE WORLD; THE JOURNEYS; ZUMBAYLLU; THE INSURRECTION; DEEP CANYON; STONE AND LIME; YAWAR MAYU; THE COLONOS; AFTERWORD; DREAMS AND MAGIC IN JOSÉ MARIA ARGUEDAS by Mario Vargas Llosa; GLOSSARY. . José Maria Arguedas was an ethnologist, a poet, a folk musicologist, and the major Indianist novelist of our time. He was born in 1911 in Andahuaylas in rural Peru and, like Emesto, was raised by Indian servants whom he deeply loved. He earned his doctorate in anthropology at the University of San Marcos in Lima, where he was head of the Anthropology Department at the time of his death. While Arguedas’ poetry was published in Quechua, he invented a language for his novels in which he used native syntax with Spanish vocabulary. This makes translation into other languages extremely difficult. Frances Horning Barraclough teaches Spanish at Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York, and has spent almost twenty years living and working in Chile and other parts of Latin America.

José María Arguedas Altamirano (18 January 1911 – 28 November 1969) was a Peruvian novelist, poet, and anthropologist. Arguedas was a mestizo of Spanish and Quechua descent who wrote novels, short stories, and poems in both Spanish and Quechua. Generally remembered as one of the most notable figures of 20th century Peruvian literature, Arguedas is especially recognized for his intimate portrayals of indigenous Andean culture. Key in his desire to depict indigenous expression and perspective more authentically was his creation of a new language that blended Spanish and Quechua and premiered in his debut novel Yawar Fiesta. Jose Maria Arguedas was born in Andahuaylas, a province in the southern Peruvian Andes. He was born into a well-off mestizo family, but his mother died when he was two years old. Because of the absence of his father, a lawyer who travelled frequently, and his bad relationship with his step-mother and step-brother, he comforted himself in the care of the family's indigenous servants, allowing him to immerse himself in the language and customs of the Andes, which came to form an important part of his personality. He went to primary school in San Juan de Lucana, Puquio, and Abancay, and completed his secondary studies in Ica, Huancayo, and Lima. He began studying at The University of San Marcos (Lima) in 1931; there he graduated with a degree in Literature. He later took up studies in Ethnology, receiving his degree in 1957 and his doctorate in 1963. Between 1937 and 1938 he was sent to prison for his protesting an envoy sent to Peru by Italian dictator Benito Mussolini. Arguedas also worked for the Ministry of Education, where he into practice his interests in preserving and promoting Peruvian culture, in particular traditional Andean music and dance. He was the director of the Casa de la Cultura (1963) and Director of the National Museum of History (1964–1966). Arguedas shot himself in the head on November 29, 1969 in his office at the Agrarian University in La Molina, leaving behind very specific instructions for his funeral, a diary depicting his depression, and a final unfinished manuscript, El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo (The Fox From Up Above and the Fox From Down Below). This work includes portions of Arguedas’ diary, memories of his distressing childhood, thoughts on Peruvian culture, and his reasons for suicide. He depicts his struggle between his desire to authentically illuminate the life of the Andean Indians and his personal anguish trapping him in depression. The title of the book originates in a Quechua myth that Arguedas translated into Spanish earlier in his life. ‘El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo’ refers to the Quechua symbols for life and death, and modernity and tradition. Arguedas began his literary career by writing short stories about the indigenous environment familiar to him from his childhood. He wrote in a Spanish highly influenced by Quechua syntax and vocabulary. By the time he published his first novel in 1941, Yawar Fiesta (‘Blood Festival’), he had begun to explore the theme that would interest him for the rest of his career: the clash between Western ‘civilization’ and the indigenous, ‘traditional’ way of life. He was thus considered part of the Indigenista movement in South American literature, and continued to explore this theme in his next two books Los Ríos Profundos (‘Deep Rivers’) (1958) and Todas las Sangres (1964). Yet he also was conscious of the simplistic portrayal of the indigenous peoples in other Indigenista literature and worked hard to give the Andean Indians a true voice in his works. This effort was not always successful as some critics contend that Arguedas portrayed Indian characters as too gentle and childlike. Another theme in Arguedas' writing is the struggle of mestizos of Indian-Spanish descent and their navigation between the two seemingly separate parts of their identity. Many of his works also depicted the violence and exploitation of race relations in Peru's small rural towns and haciendas, Arguedas was moderately optimistic about the possibility of a rapprochement between the forces of ‘tradition’ and the forces of ‘modernity’ until the 1960s, when he became more pessimistic. In his last (unfinished) work, El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo (‘The Fox From Up Above and the Fox From Down Below’) (1969), he abandoned the realism of his earlier works for a more postmodern approach. This novel expressed his despair, caused by his fear that the 'primitive' ways of the Indians could not survive the onslaught of modern technology and capitalism. At the same time that Arguedas was becoming more pessimistic about race relations in his country, younger indigenist intellectuals became increasingly militant, often criticizing his work in harsh terms for his poetic, romanticized treatment of indigenous and rural life.
Arguedas, Jose Maria. Deep Rivers. Austin. 1992. University Of Texas Press. 0292715331. Translated from the Spanish by Frances Horning Barraclough. Introduction by John V. Murra. Afterword by Mario Vargas Llosa. 248 pages. paperback.

This powerful, poetic novel, set in the Peruvian Andes, has long resisted translation; its publication in English is truly a literary event. José Maria Arguedas draws upon his own Peruvian boyhood in portraying ‘the sad and powerful current that buffets children who must face, all alone, a world fraught with monsters and fire and great rivers. . .’ Ernesto, the narrator of DEEP RIVERS, is a child with origins in two worlds. The son of a wandering country lawyer, he is brought up by Indian servants until he enters a Catholic boarding school at age 14. In this urban Spanish environment he is a misfit and a loner. The conflict of the Indian and the Spanish cultures is acted out within him as it was in the life of Arguedas. For the author, the final resolution was his suicide in 1969. For the boy Ernesto, salvation is his world of dreams and memories.While Arguedas’ poetry was published in Quechua, he invented a language for his novels in which he used native syntax with Spanish vocabulary. This makes translation into other languages extremely difficult, and Frances Horning Barraclough has done a masterful job, winning the 1978 Translation Center Award from Columbia University for her efforts.

José Maria Arguedas (18 January 1911 – 28 November 1969) was an ethnologist, a poet, a folk musicologist, and the major Indianist novelist of our time. He was born in 1911 in Andahuaylas in rural Peru and, like Ernesto, was raised by Indian servants whom he deeply loved. He earned his doctorate in anthropology at the University of San Marcos in Lima, where he was head of the Anthropology Department at the time of his death.
Arguedas, Jose Maria. The Fox From Up Above and the Fox From Down Below. Pittsburgh. 2000. University Of Pittsburgh Press. 0822957183. Translated from the Spanish by Francis Horning Barraclough. A Critical Edition With Essays by William Rowe, Christian Fernandez, & Sara Castro-Klaren. Introduction by Julio Ortega. Critical Essays Translated by Fred Fornoff. 326 pages. paperback. Cover by Gerardo Chavez

PITTSBURGH EDITIONS OF LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE. ‘Frances Horning Barraclough’s fine translation of José Maria Arguedas’s complex novel about life and death is a major contribution to making important works of Latin American fiction known to an international audience. The original introduction and insightful essays by renowned critics of Arguedas’s work included here with the novel make this an ideal text for classroom use.’ - Marcia Stephenson, Purdue University. ‘An epochal novel, at the chronological heart of the Latin American Boom but not a part of it; a witness to an ‘other’ writing intense enough to arrest our world, and any world. The Fox in its unfinished yet terminally finished state, in its passionate yet unwilled witnessing of dissolution and loss, but also in its intimations of a possible dawn, will remain a decisive if enigmatic event in Latin American history.’ - Alberto Moreiras, Duke University. The last novel by Peruvian writer José Maria Arguedas, set in the booming port city of Chimbote, is an expression of the human costs of rapid modernization. Tragically, the malaise of the society is reflected in the literal self-destruction of the author, a process chronicled in four diaries woven into the novel itself Arguedas shot himself to death, closing his own life but deliberately leaving his novel open. Fittingly, the forces of destruction in this rich and fascinating work are wondrously transformed by language and emotion, by faith and redemption. As with the other Pittsburgh Editions of Latin American Literature, The Fox from Up Above and the Fox from Down Below contains critical essays providing background and analyses of the text for classroom use. Cover illustration by Gerardo Chavez. Frances Horning Barradough, Translator. Julio Ortega, Editor.

José María Arguedas Altamirano (18 January 1911 – 28 November 1969) was a Peruvian novelist, poet, and anthropologist. Arguedas was a mestizo of Spanish and Quechua descent who wrote novels, short stories, and poems in both Spanish and Quechua. Generally remembered as one of the most notable figures of 20th century Peruvian literature, Arguedas is especially recognized for his intimate portrayals of indigenous Andean culture. Key in his desire to depict indigenous expression and perspective more authentically was his creation of a new language that blended Spanish and Quechua and premiered in his debut novel Yawar Fiesta. Jose Maria Arguedas was born in Andahuaylas, a province in the southern Peruvian Andes. He was born into a well-off mestizo family, but his mother died when he was two years old. Because of the absence of his father, a lawyer who travelled frequently, and his bad relationship with his step-mother and step-brother, he comforted himself in the care of the family's indigenous servants, allowing him to immerse himself in the language and customs of the Andes, which came to form an important part of his personality. He went to primary school in San Juan de Lucana, Puquio, and Abancay, and completed his secondary studies in Ica, Huancayo, and Lima. He began studying at The University of San Marcos (Lima) in 1931; there he graduated with a degree in Literature. He later took up studies in Ethnology, receiving his degree in 1957 and his doctorate in 1963. Between 1937 and 1938 he was sent to prison for his protesting an envoy sent to Peru by Italian dictator Benito Mussolini. Arguedas also worked for the Ministry of Education, where he into practice his interests in preserving and promoting Peruvian culture, in particular traditional Andean music and dance. He was the director of the Casa de la Cultura (1963) and Director of the National Museum of History (1964–1966). Arguedas shot himself in the head on November 29, 1969 in his office at the Agrarian University in La Molina, leaving behind very specific instructions for his funeral, a diary depicting his depression, and a final unfinished manuscript, El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo (The Fox From Up Above and the Fox From Down Below). This work includes portions of Arguedas’ diary, memories of his distressing childhood, thoughts on Peruvian culture, and his reasons for suicide. He depicts his struggle between his desire to authentically illuminate the life of the Andean Indians and his personal anguish trapping him in depression. The title of the book originates in a Quechua myth that Arguedas translated into Spanish earlier in his life. ‘El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo’ refers to the Quechua symbols for life and death, and modernity and tradition. Arguedas began his literary career by writing short stories about the indigenous environment familiar to him from his childhood. He wrote in a Spanish highly influenced by Quechua syntax and vocabulary. By the time he published his first novel in 1941, Yawar Fiesta (‘Blood Festival’), he had begun to explore the theme that would interest him for the rest of his career: the clash between Western ‘civilization’ and the indigenous, ‘traditional’ way of life. He was thus considered part of the Indigenista movement in South American literature, and continued to explore this theme in his next two books Los Ríos Profundos (‘Deep Rivers’) (1958) and Todas las Sangres (1964). Yet he also was conscious of the simplistic portrayal of the indigenous peoples in other Indigenista literature and worked hard to give the Andean Indians a true voice in his works. This effort was not always successful as some critics contend that Arguedas portrayed Indian characters as too gentle and childlike. Another theme in Arguedas' writing is the struggle of mestizos of Indian-Spanish descent and their navigation between the two seemingly separate parts of their identity. Many of his works also depicted the violence and exploitation of race relations in Peru's small rural towns and haciendas, Arguedas was moderately optimistic about the possibility of a rapprochement between the forces of ‘tradition’ and the forces of ‘modernity’ until the 1960s, when he became more pessimistic. In his last (unfinished) work, El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo (‘The Fox From Up Above and the Fox From Down Below’) (1969), he abandoned the realism of his earlier works for a more postmodern approach. This novel expressed his despair, caused by his fear that the 'primitive' ways of the Indians could not survive the onslaught of modern technology and capitalism. At the same time that Arguedas was becoming more pessimistic about race relations in his country, younger indigenist intellectuals became increasingly militant, often criticizing his work in harsh terms for his poetic, romanticized treatment of indigenous and rural life.
Arguedas, Jose Maria. Yawar Fiesta. Austin. 1985. University Of Texas Press. 0292796013. Translated from the Spanish by Frances Horning Barraclough. 200 pages. hardcover.

Named Jose Maria Arguedas’ best novel by fellow writer Mario Vargas Llosa, YAWAR FIESTA dramatically portrays the clash of cultures in the small highland town of Puquio, Peru, where Arguedas himself lived in early childhood and adolescence. The incidents described in YAWAR FIESTA take place in the 1930s, soon after Peru’s national government issued an edict forbidding the traditional Indian-style bullfight, in which crowds of Indians, armed with only poncl~ and sticks of dynamite, enter a makeshift bullring to fight a wild bull. In one way or another most of the landowners and other town aristocrats, the members of Puquio’s four Indian communities, the citizens of mixed blood, and even some of the townspeople who have emigrated to the city wish openly or secretly to perpetuate the traditional contest, but their basic agreement does not preclude conflict. That conflict illustrates with unusual clarity the social, cultural, and racial characteristics of the various classes and groups in Puquio. Far from being fictionalized sociology, however, the novel glows with luminous descriptions of its ruggedly majestic highland setting and vivid portraits of the peoples who inhabit it. This first English-language translation of Yawar Fiesta is published with Puquio: A Culture in Process of Change, Arguedas’ essay describing the Indian communities of Puquio as they existed some eighteen years after the time of his novel. Readers of this essay and the fictional work may therefore perceive the same society from Arguedas’ viewpoints as anthropologist and as creative artist. The essay also reflects its author’s musicological interests and expertise, as it includes the lyrics and some of the music from Indian religious chants and a secular love theme. Texas Pan American Series. CONTENTS: Translator’s Note; Preliminary Note; The Novel and the Proble; YAWAR FIESTA - 1. Indian Town; 2. The Dispossession; 3. Wakawak’ras, Trumpets of the Earth; 4. K’ayau; 5. The Edict; 6. The Authority; 7. The Highlanders; 8. Misitu; 9. The Day Before; 10. The Auki; 11. Yawar Fiesta; Puquio: A Culture in Process of Change; Glossary.

José María Arguedas Altamirano (18 January 1911 – 28 November 1969) was a Peruvian novelist, poet, and anthropologist. Arguedas was a mestizo of Spanish and Quechua descent who wrote novels, short stories, and poems in both Spanish and Quechua. Generally remembered as one of the most notable figures of 20th century Peruvian literature, Arguedas is especially recognized for his intimate portrayals of indigenous Andean culture. Key in his desire to depict indigenous expression and perspective more authentically was his creation of a new language that blended Spanish and Quechua and premiered in his debut novel Yawar Fiesta. Jose Maria Arguedas was born in Andahuaylas, a province in the southern Peruvian Andes. He was born into a well-off mestizo family, but his mother died when he was two years old. Because of the absence of his father, a lawyer who travelled frequently, and his bad relationship with his step-mother and step-brother, he comforted himself in the care of the family's indigenous servants, allowing him to immerse himself in the language and customs of the Andes, which came to form an important part of his personality. He went to primary school in San Juan de Lucana, Puquio, and Abancay, and completed his secondary studies in Ica, Huancayo, and Lima. He began studying at The University of San Marcos (Lima) in 1931; there he graduated with a degree in Literature. He later took up studies in Ethnology, receiving his degree in 1957 and his doctorate in 1963. Between 1937 and 1938 he was sent to prison for his protesting an envoy sent to Peru by Italian dictator Benito Mussolini. Arguedas also worked for the Ministry of Education, where he into practice his interests in preserving and promoting Peruvian culture, in particular traditional Andean music and dance. He was the director of the Casa de la Cultura (1963) and Director of the National Museum of History (1964–1966). Arguedas shot himself in the head on November 29, 1969 in his office at the Agrarian University in La Molina, leaving behind very specific instructions for his funeral, a diary depicting his depression, and a final unfinished manuscript, El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo (The Fox From Up Above and the Fox From Down Below). This work includes portions of Arguedas’ diary, memories of his distressing childhood, thoughts on Peruvian culture, and his reasons for suicide. He depicts his struggle between his desire to authentically illuminate the life of the Andean Indians and his personal anguish trapping him in depression. The title of the book originates in a Quechua myth that Arguedas translated into Spanish earlier in his life. ‘El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo’ refers to the Quechua symbols for life and death, and modernity and tradition. Arguedas began his literary career by writing short stories about the indigenous environment familiar to him from his childhood. He wrote in a Spanish highly influenced by Quechua syntax and vocabulary. By the time he published his first novel in 1941, Yawar Fiesta (‘Blood Festival’), he had begun to explore the theme that would interest him for the rest of his career: the clash between Western ‘civilization’ and the indigenous, ‘traditional’ way of life. He was thus considered part of the Indigenista movement in South American literature, and continued to explore this theme in his next two books Los Ríos Profundos (‘Deep Rivers’) (1958) and Todas las Sangres (1964). Yet he also was conscious of the simplistic portrayal of the indigenous peoples in other Indigenista literature and worked hard to give the Andean Indians a true voice in his works. This effort was not always successful as some critics contend that Arguedas portrayed Indian characters as too gentle and childlike. Another theme in Arguedas' writing is the struggle of mestizos of Indian-Spanish descent and their navigation between the two seemingly separate parts of their identity. Many of his works also depicted the violence and exploitation of race relations in Peru's small rural towns and haciendas, Arguedas was moderately optimistic about the possibility of a rapprochement between the forces of ‘tradition’ and the forces of ‘modernity’ until the 1960s, when he became more pessimistic. In his last (unfinished) work, El zorro de arriba y el zorro de abajo (‘The Fox From Up Above and the Fox From Down Below’) (1969), he abandoned the realism of his earlier works for a more postmodern approach. This novel expressed his despair, caused by his fear that the 'primitive' ways of the Indians could not survive the onslaught of modern technology and capitalism. At the same time that Arguedas was becoming more pessimistic about race relations in his country, younger indigenist intellectuals became increasingly militant, often criticizing his work in harsh terms for his poetic, romanticized treatment of indigenous and rural life.
Arguedas, Jose Maria. Yawar Fiesta. Austin. 1990. University Of Texas Press. 0292796021. Translated from the Spanish by Frances Horning Barraclough. 200 pages. paperback. Cover by Ed Lindlof

Named José Maria Arguedas’ best novel by fellow writer Mario Vargas Liosa, YAWAR FIESTA dramatically portrays the clash of cultures in the small highland town of Puquio, Peru, where Arguedas himself lived in early childhood and adolescence. This first English-language translation of YAWAR FIESTA is published with ‘Puquio: A Culture in Process of Change,’ Arguedas’ essay describing the Indian communities of Puquio as they existed some eighteen years after the time of his novel. Readers of this essay and the fictional work may therefore perceive the same society from Arguedas’ viewpoints as anthropologist and as creative artist. The essay also reflects its author’s musicological expertise, as it includes the lyrics and some of the music from Indian religious chants and a secular love theme.

Born in 1911 in Andahuaylas in rural Peru, José Maria Arguedas was an ethnologist poets folk musicologist, and the major Indianist novelist of our time. He earned his doctorate in anthropology at the University of San Marcos in Lima where he was head of the anthropology department at the time of his death in 1969. While his poetry was published in Quechua, Arguedas invented a language for his novels in which he used native syntax with Spanish vocabulary. For this reason, translation of his work into other languages is extremely difficult. Frances Horning Barraclough has proven herself more than equal to this task, however, in her accomplished translations of both YAWAR FIESTA and DEEP RIVERS, also published by the University of Texas Press and presented the Columbia University Translation Center Award in 1978.
Argueta, Jorge. Del Ocaso a La Alborada/From Sundown To Dawn. Berkeley. 1989. Co Press. 0915117334. Translated from the Spanish by Barbara Jamison. English version edited by Beatriz Hernández. unpaginated. paperback. Cover: Drawings by Pedro Jiminez. Graphic Design/Layout/Typesetting by. THE ELVES, 3370 - 24th St., S.F., CA 94110

Jorge Argueta is a legitimate son of Cuscatlán and his poem, Del Ocaso A La Alborada, is a legitimate song of pain, hope, and sun’ivaL He sings not only to El Salvador but for all of America, that ContinentalAmerica dreamt of by José Marti; the same America of Cesar Vallejos’ nightmares and Pablo Neruda’s songs. It is our America, the raped, exploited, subjugated, but never broken in spirit, that Jorge Argu eta addresses in his poem. His poem that comes out of the veiy bowels and entrails that is the America, that we the Latinos who live in the belly of the monster, know best. ft is for these reasons, that Del Ocaso A L.a Alborada is worthy to be read, not only read but appreciated; for his is an honest voice without pretensions or postures, a voice that seeks to reveal and enlighten those who dwell in the darkness of the soul and says to them, ‘Look sisters and brothers, dawn is on the horizon, and the darkest part of the night will surely pass.’ - Alejandro Murguia.

Jorge Argueta (born in El Salvador and a Pipil Nahua Indian) is a Salvadorian award-winning poet and author of many highly acclaimed bilingual children’s books and short stories, covering themes related to Latino culture and traditions, nature, and the immigrant experience. He immigrated to the United States in the 1980s during the Salvadorian Civil War. Argueta grew up in Santo Domingo de Guzmán, El Salvador, where his grandmother, an Indian healer, told him stories from his indigenous heritage and their belief in a human-nature connection, instilling in him great respect for the environment and appreciation for oral tradition. He spent time in the city helping his parents run a small restaurant as well as in the countryside, helping his grandparents tend to their farm. He left El Salvador when he was 19 years old due to the ongoing Salvadoran Civil War. Argueta has worked as a gardener and in a coffeehouse. He has written numerous children’s books, short stories as well as poems that have been included in textbooks and anthologies. His children’s books are written in poetry form, in two languages (English and Spanish), and reflect the Latino experience and heritage; he also writes about the Nahuatl Indians and their deep appreciation and respect for nature. His adult poems cover themes of the hardships of growing up in El Salvador during wartime and the difficulties experienced by immigrants in the United States. He has spent over 15 years as a workshop and classroom presenter, speaking about the power of poetry on children’s lives.
Argueta, Jorge. La Puerta Del Diablo/The Devil's Gate. Berkeley. 1990. Co Press. 0915117335. Bilingual. Translated from the Spanish by Beatriz Hernandez & Barbara Jamison. 49 pages. paperback. Cover design by Victor Manuel Navarrete

Through this bilingual edition, rhythms of love, joy, despair, and hope of this Salvadorean people, Jorge Argueta, now in the United States, has both triumphed over the prison of exile, and revealed that the liberation of struggle of El Salvador should be a necessary part of conscience everywhere in the English-speaking world.

Jorge Argueta (born in El Salvador and a Pipil Nahua Indian) is a Salvadorian award-winning poet and author of many highly acclaimed bilingual children’s books and short stories, covering themes related to Latino culture and traditions, nature, and the immigrant experience. He immigrated to the United States in the 1980s during the Salvadorian Civil War. Argueta grew up in Santo Domingo de Guzmán, El Salvador, where his grandmother, an Indian healer, told him stories from his indigenous heritage and their belief in a human-nature connection, instilling in him great respect for the environment and appreciation for oral tradition. He spent time in the city helping his parents run a small restaurant as well as in the countryside, helping his grandparents tend to their farm. He left El Salvador when he was 19 years old due to the ongoing Salvadoran Civil War. Argueta has worked as a gardener and in a coffeehouse. He has written numerous children’s books, short stories as well as poems that have been included in textbooks and anthologies. His children’s books are written in poetry form, in two languages (English and Spanish), and reflect the Latino experience and heritage; he also writes about the Nahuatl Indians and their deep appreciation and respect for nature. His adult poems cover themes of the hardships of growing up in El Salvador during wartime and the difficulties experienced by immigrants in the United States. He has spent over 15 years as a workshop and classroom presenter, speaking about the power of poetry on children’s lives.
Argueta, Manilo. One Day of Life. London. 1984. Chatto & Windus/Hogarth Press. 0701127996. Translated from the Spanish by Bill Brow. 215 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration: Cathie Felstead. Photograph of author: Jan Stegeman.

In every decade a book appears which radically alters our understanding of the real tragedy behind the daily news headlines. ONE DAY OF LIFE is such a book: it is the story of El Salvador, a tour-de-force describing a day in the life of a typical peasant family caught up in the all-too-ordinary terror of an appalling civil war. We are in Chalate, a small rural town. Lupe, a Salvadorean peasant woman, married at fifteen, mother and grandmother, awakens at five thirty to the light that enters between the sticks of her wooden house. By the time we leave her at five that afternoon in the hands of the brutal Civil Guard, who are searching for her granddaughter Adolfina, we have been awed and moved by the strength and dignity with which she faces a life hard enough without political repression and barbarism. Manlio Argueta, perhaps Central America’s foremost novelist, has evoked the harsh reality of peasant life in a country groaning under fifty years of military exploitation. It is one of those rare works of political fiction which reveals, triumphantly, the meaning of a nation’s turmoil in its truest terms - those of the human lives caught up within it. . Manlio Argueta was born in El Salvador in 1935. He now lives in Costa Rica; all his work is banned in his native land. He is a poet as well as a novelist, and was awarded the Ruben Dario poetry prize in 1968. He has also won the prestigious Casa de las Americas literary prize. ONE DAY OF LIFE is the first of his novels to appear in English.

Manlio Argueta (November 24, 1935-) is a Salvadoran writer, critic, and novelist born in 1935. Although he considers himself first and foremost a poet, he is known in the English speaking world for his book One Day of Life. Argueta was born in San Miguel (El Salvador) on November 24, 1935. Argueta has stated that his exposure to ‘poetic sounds’ began during his childhood and that his foundation in poetry stemmed from his childhood imagination. Argueta’s interest in literature was strongly influenced by the world literature he read as a teenager. Argueta began his writing career by the age of 13 as a poet. He cites Pablo Neruda and García Lorca as some of his early poetic influences. Although he was relatively unknown at the time, Argueta won a national prize for his poetry around 1956, which gained him some recognition among Salvadoran and Central American poets. As he became more involved with the literary community of El Salvador, Argueta became a member of the ‘Committed Generation’. Because of his writings criticizing the government, Argueta was exiled to Costa Rica in 1972 and was not able to return to El Salvador until the 1990s. Argueta currently lives in El Salvador where he holds the position of Director of the National Public Library. He belonged to a literary group by the name of Generación Comprometida (Committed Generation, referring to political and social commitment), also known as Círculo Literario Universitario (University Literary Circle), created by Italo López Vallecillos (1932–1986). Other members of the group included Roque Dalton (1935–1975), Álvaro Menen Desleal (1931–2000), Waldo Chávez Velasco (1932), Irma Lanzas (1933), Orlando Fresedo (1932–1965), Mercedes Durand (1932–1998), Ricardo Bogrand (1930-2012), and Mauricio de la Selva. Members of the group were revolutionary in both their writing and their political views, though some members claim that ‘Generación Comprometida’ and ‘Círculo Literario Universitario’ were two different groups, it's been said that ‘Generación Comprometida’ would be formed three or four years after the ‘50's Generation’, a group which would be formed by those writers whom started publishing between 1950 and 1952 and had been members of the ‘Cenáculo de Iniciación Literaria’ such as Mercedes Durand, Irma Lanzas, Orlando Fresedo, Italo López Vallecillos, Waldo Chávez Velasco, Álvaro Menéndez Leal, Mauricio de la Selva and Ricardo Bogrand. The group sought to create social change in terms of the treatment of the lower class. But they also initiated rediscovery of cultural heritage to a certain extent. Manlio Argueta and his Committed Generation were heavily influenced by the French philosopher Jean Paul Sartre and his existentialist ideas. Existentialism is an outlook on life that emphasizes the existence, freedom, and actions of the individual. This perspective tends to be atheistic and stress human freedom and experience as a definition of existence as opposed to scientific definitions. Existentialists also do not believe in the existence of objective moral values. The political and social significance of existentialism will be discussed in the next section as it relates to Argueta’s novel One Day of Life. Some of Argueta’s works include El valle de las Hamacas (Editorial Ariel, Buenos Aires, 1977), Un hombre por la patria (poetry, Editorial Universitaria, San Salvador, 1968), En el costado de la luz (poetry, EU, San Salvador, 1968), Caperucita en la zona roja / Little Red Riding Hood in the Red Light District (Casa de las Américas Prize 1977, various editions), Un día en la vida / One Day of Life (1980), Cuzcatlán, donde bate la mar del sur / Cuzcatlán, Where the Southern Sea Beats (1986), Milagro de la Paz / A Place Called Milagro de Paz (San Salvador, Istmo Editores, 1995) Siglo de O(G)ro (San Salvador, DPI, 1997). A characteristic of Argueta’s writing style present in the majority of his works is the use of Salvadoran Spanish vernacular and slang. Argueta considers this a way to express and preserve some of El Salvador’s cultural identity. Argueta is best known for his book One Day of Life, which has been translated into over 12 languages. The book takes the reader through one day of the life of Lupe, the main character. Lupe is a grandmother in a small village of El Salvador. Although she is not very educated, she relates her personal observations, as well accounts of friends and relatives, to paint a picture of the brutality with which the Salvadoran army treated the lower class during this time period. Existentialism played a role in the novel and in Salvadoran history by counteracting religion, which had been used to oppress the masses of El Salvador. Quite the opposite of existentialist teachings, priests in El Salvador extolled the virtues of the meek and complacent. By accepting their role in life, the overworked and underpaid lower class would supposedly receive a place in heaven. But through existentialism, the peasants come to realize that what matters is how they are treated in the present. Because of its negative portrayal of the Salvadoran government and its perceived ability to incite rebellious activity, One Day of Life was banned from El Salvador. Argueta had to publish his work from Argentina after fleeing to Costa Rica. Despite the ban, One Day of Life could be found in Catholic bookstores and some hotels.
Argueta, Manlio (poetry by). El Salvador: Photographs by Adam Kufeld. New York. 1990. Norton. 0393306453. Introduction by Arnolo Ramos. Illustrated by Adam Kufeld. 184 pages. paperback.

Combining photographs, poetry and text, the authors attempt to capture the enduring dignity, courage and suffering of the civilians caught in the middle of the struggle for power between the US supported Salvadoran government and the leftist popular movement, FMLN. A comprehensive account with excellent photographs, and text by Arnolo Ramos, and poetry by Manilo Argueta.

Manlio Argueta (November 24, 1935-) is a Salvadoran writer, critic, and novelist born in 1935. Although he considers himself first and foremost a poet, he is known in the English speaking world for his book One Day of Life. Argueta was born in San Miguel (El Salvador) on November 24, 1935. Argueta has stated that his exposure to ‘poetic sounds’ began during his childhood and that his foundation in poetry stemmed from his childhood imagination. Argueta’s interest in literature was strongly influenced by the world literature he read as a teenager. Argueta began his writing career by the age of 13 as a poet. He cites Pablo Neruda and García Lorca as some of his early poetic influences. Although he was relatively unknown at the time, Argueta won a national prize for his poetry around 1956, which gained him some recognition among Salvadoran and Central American poets. As he became more involved with the literary community of El Salvador, Argueta became a member of the ‘Committed Generation’. Because of his writings criticizing the government, Argueta was exiled to Costa Rica in 1972 and was not able to return to El Salvador until the 1990s. Argueta currently lives in El Salvador where he holds the position of Director of the National Public Library. He belonged to a literary group by the name of Generación Comprometida (Committed Generation, referring to political and social commitment), also known as Círculo Literario Universitario (University Literary Circle), created by Italo López Vallecillos (1932–1986). Other members of the group included Roque Dalton (1935–1975), Álvaro Menen Desleal (1931–2000), Waldo Chávez Velasco (1932), Irma Lanzas (1933), Orlando Fresedo (1932–1965), Mercedes Durand (1932–1998), Ricardo Bogrand (1930-2012), and Mauricio de la Selva. Members of the group were revolutionary in both their writing and their political views, though some members claim that ‘Generación Comprometida’ and ‘Círculo Literario Universitario’ were two different groups, it's been said that ‘Generación Comprometida’ would be formed three or four years after the ‘50's Generation’, a group which would be formed by those writers whom started publishing between 1950 and 1952 and had been members of the ‘Cenáculo de Iniciación Literaria’ such as Mercedes Durand, Irma Lanzas, Orlando Fresedo, Italo López Vallecillos, Waldo Chávez Velasco, Álvaro Menéndez Leal, Mauricio de la Selva and Ricardo Bogrand. The group sought to create social change in terms of the treatment of the lower class. But they also initiated rediscovery of cultural heritage to a certain extent. Manlio Argueta and his Committed Generation were heavily influenced by the French philosopher Jean Paul Sartre and his existentialist ideas. Existentialism is an outlook on life that emphasizes the existence, freedom, and actions of the individual. This perspective tends to be atheistic and stress human freedom and experience as a definition of existence as opposed to scientific definitions. Existentialists also do not believe in the existence of objective moral values. The political and social significance of existentialism will be discussed in the next section as it relates to Argueta’s novel One Day of Life. Some of Argueta’s works include El valle de las Hamacas (Editorial Ariel, Buenos Aires, 1977), Un hombre por la patria (poetry, Editorial Universitaria, San Salvador, 1968), En el costado de la luz (poetry, EU, San Salvador, 1968), Caperucita en la zona roja / Little Red Riding Hood in the Red Light District (Casa de las Américas Prize 1977, various editions), Un día en la vida / One Day of Life (1980), Cuzcatlán, donde bate la mar del sur / Cuzcatlán, Where the Southern Sea Beats (1986), Milagro de la Paz / A Place Called Milagro de Paz (San Salvador, Istmo Editores, 1995) Siglo de O(G)ro (San Salvador, DPI, 1997). A characteristic of Argueta’s writing style present in the majority of his works is the use of Salvadoran Spanish vernacular and slang. Argueta considers this a way to express and preserve some of El Salvador’s cultural identity. Argueta is best known for his book One Day of Life, which has been translated into over 12 languages. The book takes the reader through one day of the life of Lupe, the main character. Lupe is a grandmother in a small village of El Salvador. Although she is not very educated, she relates her personal observations, as well accounts of friends and relatives, to paint a picture of the brutality with which the Salvadoran army treated the lower class during this time period. Existentialism played a role in the novel and in Salvadoran history by counteracting religion, which had been used to oppress the masses of El Salvador. Quite the opposite of existentialist teachings, priests in El Salvador extolled the virtues of the meek and complacent. By accepting their role in life, the overworked and underpaid lower class would supposedly receive a place in heaven. But through existentialism, the peasants come to realize that what matters is how they are treated in the present. Because of its negative portrayal of the Salvadoran government and its perceived ability to incite rebellious activity, One Day of Life was banned from El Salvador. Argueta had to publish his work from Argentina after fleeing to Costa Rica. Despite the ban, One Day of Life could be found in Catholic bookstores and some hotels.
Argueta, Manlio. Cuzcatlan. New York. 1987. Aventura. 0394742532. Translated from the Spanish by Clark Hansen. 257 pages. paperback. Cover design by Keith Sheridan Associates, Inc. Illustration by Dan Reed.

CUZCATLAN (the aboriginal name of El Salvador) moves from 1936 to 1981 as it recreates the history of a family all the while dramatizing the folklore of the Salvadoran people, their relation to the land and nature, their near-feudal poverty, and their perseverance in the face of brutal military authority. In his masterwork, Manilo Argueta gives us a highly engaging and deeply affecting work of literary imagination that forces us to empathize with a people whose political history is inextricably linked to our own.

Manlio Argueta (November 24, 1935-) is a Salvadoran writer, critic, and novelist born in 1935. Although he considers himself first and foremost a poet, he is known in the English speaking world for his book One Day of Life. Argueta was born in San Miguel (El Salvador) on November 24, 1935. Argueta has stated that his exposure to ‘poetic sounds’ began during his childhood and that his foundation in poetry stemmed from his childhood imagination. Argueta’s interest in literature was strongly influenced by the world literature he read as a teenager. Argueta began his writing career by the age of 13 as a poet. He cites Pablo Neruda and García Lorca as some of his early poetic influences. Although he was relatively unknown at the time, Argueta won a national prize for his poetry around 1956, which gained him some recognition among Salvadoran and Central American poets. As he became more involved with the literary community of El Salvador, Argueta became a member of the ‘Committed Generation’. Because of his writings criticizing the government, Argueta was exiled to Costa Rica in 1972 and was not able to return to El Salvador until the 1990s. Argueta currently lives in El Salvador where he holds the position of Director of the National Public Library. He belonged to a literary group by the name of Generación Comprometida (Committed Generation, referring to political and social commitment), also known as Círculo Literario Universitario (University Literary Circle), created by Italo López Vallecillos (1932–1986). Other members of the group included Roque Dalton (1935–1975), Álvaro Menen Desleal (1931–2000), Waldo Chávez Velasco (1932), Irma Lanzas (1933), Orlando Fresedo (1932–1965), Mercedes Durand (1932–1998), Ricardo Bogrand (1930-2012), and Mauricio de la Selva. Members of the group were revolutionary in both their writing and their political views, though some members claim that ‘Generación Comprometida’ and ‘Círculo Literario Universitario’ were two different groups, it's been said that ‘Generación Comprometida’ would be formed three or four years after the ‘50's Generation’, a group which would be formed by those writers whom started publishing between 1950 and 1952 and had been members of the ‘Cenáculo de Iniciación Literaria’ such as Mercedes Durand, Irma Lanzas, Orlando Fresedo, Italo López Vallecillos, Waldo Chávez Velasco, Álvaro Menéndez Leal, Mauricio de la Selva and Ricardo Bogrand. The group sought to create social change in terms of the treatment of the lower class. But they also initiated rediscovery of cultural heritage to a certain extent. Manlio Argueta and his Committed Generation were heavily influenced by the French philosopher Jean Paul Sartre and his existentialist ideas. Existentialism is an outlook on life that emphasizes the existence, freedom, and actions of the individual. This perspective tends to be atheistic and stress human freedom and experience as a definition of existence as opposed to scientific definitions. Existentialists also do not believe in the existence of objective moral values. The political and social significance of existentialism will be discussed in the next section as it relates to Argueta’s novel One Day of Life. Some of Argueta’s works include El valle de las Hamacas (Editorial Ariel, Buenos Aires, 1977), Un hombre por la patria (poetry, Editorial Universitaria, San Salvador, 1968), En el costado de la luz (poetry, EU, San Salvador, 1968), Caperucita en la zona roja / Little Red Riding Hood in the Red Light District (Casa de las Américas Prize 1977, various editions), Un día en la vida / One Day of Life (1980), Cuzcatlán, donde bate la mar del sur / Cuzcatlán, Where the Southern Sea Beats (1986), Milagro de la Paz / A Place Called Milagro de Paz (San Salvador, Istmo Editores, 1995) Siglo de O(G)ro (San Salvador, DPI, 1997). A characteristic of Argueta’s writing style present in the majority of his works is the use of Salvadoran Spanish vernacular and slang. Argueta considers this a way to express and preserve some of El Salvador’s cultural identity. Argueta is best known for his book One Day of Life, which has been translated into over 12 languages. The book takes the reader through one day of the life of Lupe, the main character. Lupe is a grandmother in a small village of El Salvador. Although she is not very educated, she relates her personal observations, as well accounts of friends and relatives, to paint a picture of the brutality with which the Salvadoran army treated the lower class during this time period. Existentialism played a role in the novel and in Salvadoran history by counteracting religion, which had been used to oppress the masses of El Salvador. Quite the opposite of existentialist teachings, priests in El Salvador extolled the virtues of the meek and complacent. By accepting their role in life, the overworked and underpaid lower class would supposedly receive a place in heaven. But through existentialism, the peasants come to realize that what matters is how they are treated in the present. Because of its negative portrayal of the Salvadoran government and its perceived ability to incite rebellious activity, One Day of Life was banned from El Salvador. Argueta had to publish his work from Argentina after fleeing to Costa Rica. Despite the ban, One Day of Life could be found in Catholic bookstores and some hotels.
Argueta, Manlio. One Day of Life. New York. 1983. Aventura. 0394722167. Paperback Original. Translated from the Spanish by Bill Brow. 215 pages. paperback. Cover design by Keith Sheridan/illustration by Daniel Maffia

Transposed to Chalate, a small town in rural El Salvador, you are intrigued from 530 AM, when you meet Lupe-the grandmother of the Guardado family and chief narrator of One Day of Life-who is up and about doing her chores, until 5: 00 PM., when you arrive at the disturbing resolution of the Civil Guard’s search for and interrogation of Lupe’s adolescent granddaughter, Adolfina. Told almost entirely from the point of view of the resilient women of the family, this novel is not only an affecting and inspiring evocation of the nitty-gritty of peasant life in El Salvador after fifty years of military rule. It is also a mercilessly accurate dramatization of the relationship of the peasants to both the Catholic Church and the State. In view of the deeply disturbing rise of political violence in El Salvador, and the highly controversial increase of U.S. involvement in that country’s civil war, ONE DAY OF LIFE is as timely a novel as there could ever be. Awesome for the authenticity of its vernacular style and for the incandescence of its lyricism, this compact tour de force goes beyond geopolitical rant to describe one day in the life of a typical peasant family caught up in the all-too-ordinary tenor and corruption, the sheer bad news, of El Salvador today. In ONE DAY OF LIFE-written by a Salvadoran who was forced into exile by his government as a result of this book, which has already been published in Italy, Germany and the Netherlands-the collective voice of the people of El Salvador, terrifying and irrepressible, sings about hope for social justice in the future.

Manlio Argueta (November 24, 1935-) is a Salvadoran writer, critic, and novelist born in 1935. Although he considers himself first and foremost a poet, he is known in the English speaking world for his book One Day of Life.
Arias, Arturo. After the Bombs. Willimantic. 1990. Curbstone Press. 0915306883. Translated from the Spanish by Asa Zatz. 221 pages. hardcover. Cover image: detail from a woodcut print by Nael Ojeda

An Ambassador’s daughter who entertains the hero in the nude but won’t let him touch her, a hero whose chronic skin rash reflects the torment of a whole country, prostitutes who disrupt the army by disrobing, and a revolutionary bicyclist - these are some of the characters you meet in AFTER THE BOMBS. Exciting and strange as the plot is, it is equaled by the symbolic substructure which raises universal questions about the nature of freedom and the human need for artistic and spiritual expression. The fable-like adventures and the flow of the narrative, set against the background of the dramatic historical events of 1954, place this novel firmly in the tradition of Isabel Allende, Miguel Angel Asturias, and Gabriel Garcia Márquez.

Arturo Arias was born in Guatemala in 1950. He is co-author of the film script for El Norte and the author of three novels, of which Itzam Na won the 1981 Casa de las Americas Award for Best Novel. Arturo Arias is currently a professor at The University of Texas in Austin. He holds an M.A. in English from Boston University and a Ph.D. in sociology of literature from the Ecole des Hautes en Science Sociales, Paris, A specialist on ethnic issues, a subject that is a central theme. In both his fiction and his anthropological work, Arias has written numerous books and articles about his country and the ordeal of his people. His third novel, Jaquar en Llamas, appeared in Spanish in 1989. Among his latest work is an opera libretto, The Roads to Paradise, with music by Richard Cameron. Wolfe, which will be presented to the public for the first time in 1991, He is also preparing a photo journal on Guatemala with Richard Lord. . Asa Zatz has had a long and distinguished career as a translator, which began in Mexico with the translation of The Children of Sanchez and five other works by Oscar Lewis. Since his return to New York in 1982, he has continued translating major authors from Spanish, including Garbiel Garcia Márquez, Tomás Eloy Martinez and Alejo Carpentier. This translation of After the Bombs was completed with the aid of a New York State Council for the Arts Grant for Translation.
Arias, Arturo. Rattlesnake. Willimantic. 2003. Curbstone Press. 1931896011. Translated from the Spanish by Sean Higgins and Jill Robbins. A Lannan Translation Selection. 247 pages. paperback. Cover design: Stone Graphics. Painting: ‘Conversations With a Snake’ by Norman Catherine, 2002.,

In this stunning spy novel, Tom Wright, a CIA agent, is sent to Guatemala to rescue an Australian banker abducted by guerillas. There he encounters Sandra Herrera, the first love of his life, who has since married into one of Guatemala's most powerful families. His involvement with her exposes him to internal turmoil and a host of dangers. Like Graham Greene and Lawrence Durrell, Arias is a master at capturing complex political and personal situations. Rattlesnake is replete with surprising plots and counterplots, and with people whose identities and affiliations we can never completely trust. At times, Rattlesnake makes you explode with laughter with a bull 's-eye kind of cultural humor not often seen in the United States and, at other times, it leaves you gasping in horror.

Arturo Arias (Guatemala City, 1950) is a Guatemalan novelist and critic, who is currently a professor of 20th-century Spanish-American Literature at the University of Texas at Austin. He has taught courses specializing in: Central American literature; Indigenous literatures; social and critical theory; race, gender and sexuality in post-colonial societies; cultural studies, and ethnographic approaches. Professor Arias has previously taught at San Francisco State University and the University of Redlands in Southern California,and he is a past president of the Latin American Studies Association. Dr. Arias holds a PhD in Sociology of Literature, from L'Ecole des Hautes Etudes Paris, France. (1978) He has published seven novels and four academic books. He received the Casa de las Américas prize for his novel Itzam Na (1981), the Anna Seghers award for his novel Jaguar en llamas 1990), and the Casa de las Américas prize in essay for his book Ideología, Literatura y Sociedad durante the Revolución Guatemalteca, 1944-1954 (1979). His most recent novel is Arias de Don Giovanni (FyG Editores, 2010). His books in English includeThe Rigoberta Menchú Controversy, Taking their Word, After the Bombs, and Rattlesnake.
Aridjis, Homero. 1492: The Life & Times of Juan Cabezon of Castile. London. 1991. Andre Deutsch. 0233987274. 284 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Pete Rozycki. Jacket Illustration by Steve Wallace.

Already a worldwide bestseller, 1492, by one of Mexico’s leading poets and novelists, has been hailed as a literary masterpiece, a compelling and moving story, and an extraordinarily rich reconstruction of history. Set in fifteenth-centurv Spain, when its rulers, with the aid of the Inquisition, were seizing Jewish estates to finance the wars with the Moors and the new voyages of discovery, 1492 is the story of one Juan Cabezon, a descendant of converted Jews. Orphaned at an early age by a series of bizarre accidents, and taken in hand by Pero Menique, a blind man, Cabezon leads a picaresque life among the rogues and vagabonds of Madrid until he falls in love with Isabel de la Vega, a young converted Jewess condemned in absentia to be burned at the stake. When one day she vanishes, bearing his child, Cabezon sets off on a desperate search for her which takes him across Spain, into the heart of the Jewish communities, and constantly into the path of the horrors of the Inquisition - a journey that stamps itself indelibly on the reader’s mind.

Homero Aridjis (born April 6, 1940) is a Mexican poet, novelist, environmental activist, journalist and diplomat known for his independence. Aridjis was born in Contepec, Michoacán, Mexico, on April 6, 1940, to a Greek father and a Mexican mother; he was the youngest of five brothers. His father fought in the Greek army during World War I and the Greco-Turkish War, when his family was forced to flee from their home in Tire, southeast of Smyrna, in Asia Minor. His mother grew up in Contepec amidst the turmoil of the Mexican Revolution. After nearly losing his life at age ten in a shotgun accident Aridjis became an avid reader and began to write poetry. In 1959 he was awarded a scholarship at the Rockefeller Foundation-supported Mexico City Writing Center (Centro Mexicano de Escritores), the youngest writer to have received the award in the Center’s 55-year history. Aridjis has published 42 books of poetry and prose, many of them translated into a dozen languages. His achievements include: the Xavier Villarrutia Prize for best book of the year for Mirándola dormir, in 1964, the youngest writer to receive the prize; the Diana-Novedades Literary Prize for the outstanding novel in Spanish, for Memorias del nuevo mundo, in 1988; and the Premio Grinzane Cavour, for best foreign fiction, in 1992, for the Italian translation of 1492, Vida y tiempos de Juan Cabezón de Castilla. 1492 The Life and Times of Juan Cabezon of Castile was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. He received the Prix Roger Caillois in France for his poetry and prose and Serbia’s highest literary honor, the Smederevo Golden Key Prize, for his poetry. In 2005 the state of Michoacan awarded him the first Erendira State Prize for the Arts. Twice the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, Aridjis was named Doctor Honoris Causa by Indiana University. He has been a visiting professor at Indiana University, New York University and Columbia, and held the Nichols Chair in Humanities and the Public Sphere at the University of California, Irvine. He has been an editorial page columnist at the Mexican newspapers La Jornada, Reforma and El Universal since 1985, publishing hundreds of articles about environmental, political and literary topics. Homero Aridjis has served as Mexico's ambassador to the Netherlands and Switzerland and to the UNESCO in Paris. For six years he was President of International PEN, the worldwide association of writers. In 1965, Aridjis married Betty Ferber. They have two daughters, Eva Aridjis, a filmmaker in New York (Niños de la calle, La Santa Muerte, The Favor) and writer Chloe Aridjis, in London (Books of Clouds, Topografía de lo insólito).
Aridjis, Homero. 1492: The Life & Times of Juan Cabezon of Castile. New York. 1991. Summit Books. 0671644998. Translated from the Spanish by Betty Ferber. 285 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Julie Metz. Jacket painting: Paris, Bibliotheque Nationale, ins. h?br. 1388, folio 14 recto (detail). Author photograph by Tom Victor.

Part picaresque novel, part moving romance, part historical document, this extraordinary reconstruction of fifteenth-century Spain, by one of Mexico’s leading literary figures, has been acclaimed throughout Europe and Latin America. This was the century that changed the face of Spain, and of the world - the century of the wars with the Moors, which led to the end of Moorish Spain; the voyages of discovery, which culminated in Columbus’s enterprise; and, perhaps above all, the century of the Inquisition, which financed both the wars and the voyages by seizing the fortunes of condemned Jews, and which led inexorably to the Expulsion. Here these events are seen through the eyes of one Juan Cabezon, a descendant of converted Jews, who is orphaned at an early age by a series of bizarre accidents and taken in hand by Pero Menique, a clever blind man, who uses him as a guide through the rich street life of Castile It is Menique who brings him beautiful young Isabel de la Vega, sentenced to death by the Inquisition, and begs him to hide her in his house. Juan and Isabel fall in love, but as time passes, Isabel is driven close to madness by her forced seclusion in Juan’s house and her constant fear of death. One day she vanishes, and Juan sets off on a desperate search for her which takes him across Spain, into the heart of the Jewish communities, and constantly into the path of the Inquisition’s autos-da-fë - a journey that stamps itself indelibly on the reader’s mind. HOMERO ARIDJIS is one of Mexico’s foremost poets and novelists. He has published more than twenty books of poetry and prose and won the Xavier Villaurrutia Prize for best book of the year in 1964 and the 1988 Diana- Novedades Literary Prize for the outstanding novel in Spanish for the sequel to 1492, Memorias del nuevo mundo. Two volumes of his poetry have been published in English, Blue Spaces and Exaltation of Light, as well as a novel, PERSEPHONE. Twice the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, he has taught at Columbia University, New York University, and the University of Indiana. he has been Mexican Ambassador to the Netherlands and Switzerland and is the president of the Group of 100, Mexico’s leading environmental organization. He lives in Mexico City

Homero Aridjis (born April 6, 1940) is a Mexican poet, novelist, environmental activist, journalist and diplomat known for his independence. Aridjis was born in Contepec, Michoacán, Mexico, on April 6, 1940, to a Greek father and a Mexican mother; he was the youngest of five brothers. His father fought in the Greek army during World War I and the Greco-Turkish War, when his family was forced to flee from their home in Tire, southeast of Smyrna, in Asia Minor. His mother grew up in Contepec amidst the turmoil of the Mexican Revolution. After nearly losing his life at age ten in a shotgun accident Aridjis became an avid reader and began to write poetry. In 1959 he was awarded a scholarship at the Rockefeller Foundation-supported Mexico City Writing Center (Centro Mexicano de Escritores), the youngest writer to have received the award in the Center’s 55-year history. Aridjis has published 42 books of poetry and prose, many of them translated into a dozen languages. His achievements include: the Xavier Villarrutia Prize for best book of the year for Mirándola dormir, in 1964, the youngest writer to receive the prize; the Diana-Novedades Literary Prize for the outstanding novel in Spanish, for Memorias del nuevo mundo, in 1988; and the Premio Grinzane Cavour, for best foreign fiction, in 1992, for the Italian translation of 1492, Vida y tiempos de Juan Cabezón de Castilla. 1492 The Life and Times of Juan Cabezon of Castile was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. He received the Prix Roger Caillois in France for his poetry and prose and Serbia’s highest literary honor, the Smederevo Golden Key Prize, for his poetry. In 2005 the state of Michoacan awarded him the first Erendira State Prize for the Arts. Twice the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, Aridjis was named Doctor Honoris Causa by Indiana University. He has been a visiting professor at Indiana University, New York University and Columbia, and held the Nichols Chair in Humanities and the Public Sphere at the University of California, Irvine. He has been an editorial page columnist at the Mexican newspapers La Jornada, Reforma and El Universal since 1985, publishing hundreds of articles about environmental, political and literary topics. Homero Aridjis has served as Mexico's ambassador to the Netherlands and Switzerland and to the UNESCO in Paris. For six years he was President of International PEN, the worldwide association of writers. In 1965, Aridjis married Betty Ferber. They have two daughters, Eva Aridjis, a filmmaker in New York (Niños de la calle, La Santa Muerte, The Favor) and writer Chloe Aridjis, in London (Books of Clouds, Topografía de lo insólito).
Aridjis, Homero. Blue Spaces/Los Espacios Azules. New York. 1974. Seabury Press. 0816491909. Introduction & Edited by Kenneth Rexroth. Bilingual Various Translators From The Spanish. 191 pages. hardcover. Cover: Linda Brady

In less than ten years, the name of Homero Aridjis has seen an extraordinary rise in the esteem of readers of Spanish poetry. Blue Spaces is his own selection of some of his best poems as translated into English by such outstanding poets as W.S. Merwin, Eliot Weinberger, Nathaniel Tarn, Kenneth Rexroth, Jerome Rothenberg, and Betty Ferber. The selections are from Los espacios azules (1969), Ajedrez-Navegaciones (1969), and El poeta niF~o (1971). ‘A visionary poet of lyrical bliss, crystalline concentrations, and infinite spaces,’ as Kenneth Rexroth describes him in his Introduction, Aridjis’ best work is now available to the English-speaking world.

Homero Aridjis (born April 6, 1940) is a Mexican poet, novelist, environmental activist, journalist and diplomat known for his independence. Aridjis was born in Contepec, Michoacán, Mexico, on April 6, 1940, to a Greek father and a Mexican mother; he was the youngest of five brothers. His father fought in the Greek army during World War I and the Greco-Turkish War, when his family was forced to flee from their home in Tire, southeast of Smyrna, in Asia Minor. His mother grew up in Contepec amidst the turmoil of the Mexican Revolution. After nearly losing his life at age ten in a shotgun accident Aridjis became an avid reader and began to write poetry. In 1959 he was awarded a scholarship at the Rockefeller Foundation-supported Mexico City Writing Center (Centro Mexicano de Escritores), the youngest writer to have received the award in the Center’s 55-year history. Aridjis has published 42 books of poetry and prose, many of them translated into a dozen languages. His achievements include: the Xavier Villarrutia Prize for best book of the year for Mirándola dormir, in 1964, the youngest writer to receive the prize; the Diana-Novedades Literary Prize for the outstanding novel in Spanish, for Memorias del nuevo mundo, in 1988; and the Premio Grinzane Cavour, for best foreign fiction, in 1992, for the Italian translation of 1492, Vida y tiempos de Juan Cabezón de Castilla. 1492 The Life and Times of Juan Cabezon of Castile was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. He received the Prix Roger Caillois in France for his poetry and prose and Serbia’s highest literary honor, the Smederevo Golden Key Prize, for his poetry. In 2005 the state of Michoacan awarded him the first Erendira State Prize for the Arts. Twice the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, Aridjis was named Doctor Honoris Causa by Indiana University. He has been a visiting professor at Indiana University, New York University and Columbia, and held the Nichols Chair in Humanities and the Public Sphere at the University of California, Irvine. He has been an editorial page columnist at the Mexican newspapers La Jornada, Reforma and El Universal since 1985, publishing hundreds of articles about environmental, political and literary topics. Homero Aridjis has served as Mexico's ambassador to the Netherlands and Switzerland and to the UNESCO in Paris. For six years he was President of International PEN, the worldwide association of writers. In 1965, Aridjis married Betty Ferber. They have two daughters, Eva Aridjis, a filmmaker in New York (Niños de la calle, La Santa Muerte, The Favor) and writer Chloe Aridjis, in London (Books of Clouds, Topografía de lo insólito).
Aridjis, Homero. Exaltation of Light. Brockport. 1981. BOA Editions. 0918526280. Translated from the Spanish by Eliot Weinberger. 159 pages. hardcover.

EXALTATION OF LIGHT has been issued in a first edition of twelve hundred copies, of which seven hundred are in paper and four hundred and fifty are in cloth. An additional fifty copies have been bound in quarter-cloth and French papers over boards by Gene Eckert; ten copies, numbered I- X, have been signed by Homero Aridjis and Eliot Weinberger and include a poem in holograph in Spanish by Homero Aridjis and in English by Eliot Weinberger; twenty-six copies, lettered A-Z, have been signed by the poet and the translator; and fourteen copies, numbered i-xiv and signed by the poet and translator, have been retained by the publisher for presentation purposes. These translations, prepared in collaboration with the author, are based on the texts of Quentar las naves (1975), Vivir para ver (1977), and later, uncollected poems. In some cases the translations incorporate revisions made by the author after book publication. Spanish texts copyright 1975, 1977 by Editorial Joaquin Mortiz, S.A. CONTENTS: I. EXALTATION OF LIGHT - Exaltation of Light; II. BURN THE BOATS - Tezcatlipoca; Xipe Totec; Precolumbian; The great father fell; Burn the boats; The Slaughter in the Main Temple; There are Birds in This Land; Dream in Tenochtitlan; Popocatepetl; Driving thin mules; The Dead of the Revolution; Zapata; Barbershop; In the kitchen; Mexico City; Letter from Mexico; This is Altimirano Hill; Huitzilopochtli; San Miguel in the Backyard; The Hill of the Star; The Prophecy of Man; Mexico City; III. DIARY WITHOUT DATES - Diary Without Dates; IV. LIVING TO SEE - In his room the man watches; Living to See; We Inherit Pain and Pass It On; An apple rests; This; Lovers; Madman at Night; The Road; Presences; The old woman’s parrot prattles; Window; To a Spanish Refugee; Mardis Longtemps Vacants; Signs; My Father; Inventory at Age 31; Not even a cloud; Consuming light; Sun set; The day that left; The Poem; Landscape; V. NEW FIRE - New Fire: Sacred Aztec Ceremony; New Fire: Notes.

Homero Aridjis (born April 6, 1940) is a Mexican poet, novelist, environmental activist, journalist and diplomat known for his independence. Aridjis was born in Contepec, Michoacán, Mexico, on April 6, 1940, to a Greek father and a Mexican mother; he was the youngest of five brothers. His father fought in the Greek army during World War I and the Greco-Turkish War, when his family was forced to flee from their home in Tire, southeast of Smyrna, in Asia Minor. His mother grew up in Contepec amidst the turmoil of the Mexican Revolution. After nearly losing his life at age ten in a shotgun accident Aridjis became an avid reader and began to write poetry. In 1959 he was awarded a scholarship at the Rockefeller Foundation-supported Mexico City Writing Center (Centro Mexicano de Escritores), the youngest writer to have received the award in the Center’s 55-year history. Aridjis has published 42 books of poetry and prose, many of them translated into a dozen languages. His achievements include: the Xavier Villarrutia Prize for best book of the year for Mirándola dormir, in 1964, the youngest writer to receive the prize; the Diana-Novedades Literary Prize for the outstanding novel in Spanish, for Memorias del nuevo mundo, in 1988; and the Premio Grinzane Cavour, for best foreign fiction, in 1992, for the Italian translation of 1492, Vida y tiempos de Juan Cabezón de Castilla. 1492 The Life and Times of Juan Cabezon of Castile was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. He received the Prix Roger Caillois in France for his poetry and prose and Serbia’s highest literary honor, the Smederevo Golden Key Prize, for his poetry. In 2005 the state of Michoacan awarded him the first Erendira State Prize for the Arts. Twice the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, Aridjis was named Doctor Honoris Causa by Indiana University. He has been a visiting professor at Indiana University, New York University and Columbia, and held the Nichols Chair in Humanities and the Public Sphere at the University of California, Irvine. He has been an editorial page columnist at the Mexican newspapers La Jornada, Reforma and El Universal since 1985, publishing hundreds of articles about environmental, political and literary topics. Homero Aridjis has served as Mexico's ambassador to the Netherlands and Switzerland and to the UNESCO in Paris. For six years he was President of International PEN, the worldwide association of writers. In 1965, Aridjis married Betty Ferber. They have two daughters, Eva Aridjis, a filmmaker in New York (Niños de la calle, La Santa Muerte, The Favor) and writer Chloe Aridjis, in London (Books of Clouds, Topografía de lo insólito). Eliot Weinberger is a poet, translator, and editor of the distinguished international journal of poetry and translation, Montemora. His other books of translations include EAGLE OR SUN? and A DRAFT OF SHADOWS, both by Octavio Paz.
Aridjis, Homero. Persephone. New York. 1986. Aventura. 0394741757. Translated from the Revised Spanish Edition by Betty Ferber. 202 pages. paperback. Cover design by Keith Sheridan. Illustration by Joan Hall

Internationally acclaimed as the pre-eminent Mexican poet of his generation, Homero Aridjis here gives us his stunning American literary debut: PERSEPHONE. Extraordinary for its searing lyricism, this poetic erotic novel, or novelistic erotic poem, poignantly retells the myth of Persephone for our times, even as it richly depicts and ruthlessly dissects the vicissitudes of sexual passion. Virgin and whore, she was goddess of fertility and queen of the underworld. While she was still a maiden, Pluto seized her and held her captive in his underworld. She was released only on condition that she return to Hades for six months every year. When Persephone returns to earth, life blossoms. When she leaves, winter sets, everything dies. Now, in a brilliant feat of literary imagination, Homero Aridjis has transposed the myth of Persephone to the infernal underside of Mexico today, a sexual poetry astonishing for its precision and incandescence.

Homero Aridjis (born April 6, 1940) is a Mexican poet, novelist, environmental activist, journalist and diplomat known for his independence. Aridjis was born in Contepec, Michoacán, Mexico, on April 6, 1940, to a Greek father and a Mexican mother; he was the youngest of five brothers. His father fought in the Greek army during World War I and the Greco-Turkish War, when his family was forced to flee from their home in Tire, southeast of Smyrna, in Asia Minor. His mother grew up in Contepec amidst the turmoil of the Mexican Revolution. After nearly losing his life at age ten in a shotgun accident Aridjis became an avid reader and began to write poetry. In 1959 he was awarded a scholarship at the Rockefeller Foundation-supported Mexico City Writing Center (Centro Mexicano de Escritores), the youngest writer to have received the award in the Center’s 55-year history. Aridjis has published 42 books of poetry and prose, many of them translated into a dozen languages. His achievements include: the Xavier Villarrutia Prize for best book of the year for Mirándola dormir, in 1964, the youngest writer to receive the prize; the Diana-Novedades Literary Prize for the outstanding novel in Spanish, for Memorias del nuevo mundo, in 1988; and the Premio Grinzane Cavour, for best foreign fiction, in 1992, for the Italian translation of 1492, Vida y tiempos de Juan Cabezón de Castilla. 1492 The Life and Times of Juan Cabezon of Castile was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. He received the Prix Roger Caillois in France for his poetry and prose and Serbia’s highest literary honor, the Smederevo Golden Key Prize, for his poetry. In 2005 the state of Michoacan awarded him the first Erendira State Prize for the Arts. Twice the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, Aridjis was named Doctor Honoris Causa by Indiana University. He has been a visiting professor at Indiana University, New York University and Columbia, and held the Nichols Chair in Humanities and the Public Sphere at the University of California, Irvine. He has been an editorial page columnist at the Mexican newspapers La Jornada, Reforma and El Universal since 1985, publishing hundreds of articles about environmental, political and literary topics. Homero Aridjis has served as Mexico's ambassador to the Netherlands and Switzerland and to the UNESCO in Paris. For six years he was President of International PEN, the worldwide association of writers. In 1965, Aridjis married Betty Ferber. They have two daughters, Eva Aridjis, a filmmaker in New York (Niños de la calle, La Santa Muerte, The Favor) and writer Chloe Aridjis, in London (Books of Clouds, Topografía de lo insólito).
Aridjis, Homero. The Child Poet. Brooklyn. 2016. Archipelago Books. 9780914671404. Translated from the Spanish by Chloe Aridjis. 153 pages. paperback.

Homero Aridjis has always said that he was born twice. The first time was to his mother in April 1940 and the second time was as a poet, in January 1951. His life was distinctly cleaved in two by an accident. Before that fateful Saturday he was carefree and confident, the youngest of five brothers growing up in the small Mexican village of Contepec, Michoacán. After the accident - in which he nearly died on the operating table after shooting himself with a shotgun his brothers had left propped against the bedroom wall - he became a shy, introspective child who spent afternoons reading Homer and writing poems and stories at the dining room table instead of playing soccer with his classmates. After the accident his early childhood became like a locked garden. But in 1971, when his wife became pregnant with their first daughter, the memories found a way out. Visions from this elusive period started coming back to him in astonishingly vivid dreams, giving shape to what would become The Child Poet. Aridjis is joyously imaginative. The Child Poet has urgency but still takes its time, celebrating images and feelings and the strangeness of childhood. Readers will love being in the world he has created. Aridjis paints the pueblo of Cotepec -- the landscape, the campesinos, the Church, the legacy of the Mexican Revolution -- through the eyes of a sensitive child.

Homero Aridjis (born April 6, 1940) is a Mexican poet, novelist, environmental activist, journalist and diplomat known for his independence. Aridjis was born in Contepec, Michoacán, Mexico, on April 6, 1940, to a Greek father and a Mexican mother; he was the youngest of five brothers. His father fought in the Greek army during World War I and the Greco-Turkish War, when his family was forced to flee from their home in Tire, southeast of Smyrna, in Asia Minor. His mother grew up in Contepec amidst the turmoil of the Mexican Revolution. After nearly losing his life at age ten in a shotgun accident Aridjis became an avid reader and began to write poetry. In 1959 he was awarded a scholarship at the Rockefeller Foundation-supported Mexico City Writing Center (Centro Mexicano de Escritores), the youngest writer to have received the award in the Center’s 55-year history. Aridjis has published 42 books of poetry and prose, many of them translated into a dozen languages. His achievements include: the Xavier Villarrutia Prize for best book of the year for Mirándola dormir, in 1964, the youngest writer to receive the prize; the Diana-Novedades Literary Prize for the outstanding novel in Spanish, for Memorias del nuevo mundo, in 1988; and the Premio Grinzane Cavour, for best foreign fiction, in 1992, for the Italian translation of 1492, Vida y tiempos de Juan Cabezón de Castilla. 1492 The Life and Times of Juan Cabezon of Castile was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year. He received the Prix Roger Caillois in France for his poetry and prose and Serbia’s highest literary honor, the Smederevo Golden Key Prize, for his poetry. In 2005 the state of Michoacan awarded him the first Erendira State Prize for the Arts. Twice the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, Aridjis was named Doctor Honoris Causa by Indiana University. He has been a visiting professor at Indiana University, New York University and Columbia, and held the Nichols Chair in Humanities and the Public Sphere at the University of California, Irvine. He has been an editorial page columnist at the Mexican newspapers La Jornada, Reforma and El Universal since 1985, publishing hundreds of articles about environmental, political and literary topics. Homero Aridjis has served as Mexico's ambassador to the Netherlands and Switzerland and to the UNESCO in Paris. For six years he was President of International PEN, the worldwide association of writers. In 1965, Aridjis married Betty Ferber. They have two daughters, Eva Aridjis, a filmmaker in New York (Niños de la calle, La Santa Muerte, The Favor) and writer Chloe Aridjis, in London (Books of Clouds, Topografía de lo insólito).
Aridjis, Homero. The Lord of the Last Days: Visions of the Year 1000. New York. 1995. Morrow. 0688143423. Translated from the Spanish by Betty Ferber. 259 pages. hardcover. Jacket design and illustration by Bradford Foltz.

As the world hovers perilously on the brink of a new millennium, Spanish monk Alfonso de Leon takes a bloody comet as a sign of the coming of the Antichrist and a portent of the end of time. Miracles and monstrous infants abound. Soon Moorish and Christian armies will clash in an apocalyptic battle for control of Spain. The war of two civilizations is embodied in a poignant duel to the death between twin brothers born to a concubine in a harem at Cordoba: Alfonso, scribe and illuminator of the Book of Revaltion, and Abd Allah, the Black Rider, ruthless captain of al-Mansur’s troops. Face-to-face after years of separation, each strives to free himself from the other’s uncanny hold. Two women, Jimena and Almarada, share the brothers’ destinies. Meanwhile, another contest is under way, as the burgeoning Spanish language struggles to emerge from its Latin roots. Using his lyrical and narrative powers and a keen eye for doomsday terrors and superstitions, Aridjis conjures up a panoply of compelling characters - the false messiah Isidoro the First, who does a brisk trade in spurious relics; wandering minstrels Sancho Saborejo and Oro Maria; the hermaphrodite Dona Miguel; saintly virgins, wistful eunuchs, hermits, monks and nuns - while contrasting the military might and sensuous splendor of the Cordoban caliphate with the austerity and religious fervor of the Christian kingdoms to the north. This vivid fresco of a turning point in history blends imagination, historical accuracy, and an extraordinary wealth of detail into a spellbinding revelation of a time both unlike and like our own.

Homero Aridjis (born April 6, 1940) is a Mexican poet, novelist, environmental activist, journalist and diplomat known for his independence.
Arlt, Roberto. Mad Toy. Durham. 2002. Duke University Press. 0822329409. Translated from the Spanish by Michele McKay Aynesworth. Simultaneous Hardcover Publication. 171 pages. paperback.

Mad Toy, Arlt’s most acclaimed novel, is set against the chaotic background of Buenos Aires in the early twentieth century. Set in the badlands of adolescence, where acts of theft and betrayal become metaphors for creativity. Mad Toy is equal parts pulp fiction, realism, detective story, expressionist drama, and creative memoir. An immigrant son of a German father and an Italian mother, Arlt as a youth was poor, often hungry, and dropped out of school in the third grade. In MAD TOY he brings his personal experience to bear on the lives of his characters. Published in 1926 as El Juguete Rabioso, the novel follows the adventures of Silvio Artier, a poverty-striken and frustrated youth who is drawn to gangs and a life of petty crime. As Silvio struggles to bridge the gap between exuberant imagination and the sordid reality around him, he becomes fascinated with weapons, explosives, vandalism, and thievery, despite a desperate desire to rise above his origins. Flavored with a dash of romance, a hint of allegory, and a healthy dose of irony, the novel’s language varies from the cultured idiom of the narrator to the dialects and street slang of the novel’s many colorful characters. MAD TOY has appeared in numerous Spanish editions and has been adapted for the stage and for film. It is the second of his novels to be translated into English. ‘Roberto Arlt is the greatest Argentine writer of the twentieth century. ‘- Ricardo Piglia.

Roberto Arlt (1900–1942) was an Argentine writer. He was born Roberto Godofredo Christophersen Arlt in Buenos Aires on April 2, 1900. His parents were both immigrants: his father Karl Arlt was a Prussian from Posen (now Poznan in present-day Poland) and his mother was Ekatherine Iobstraibitzer, a native of Trieste and Italian speaking. German was the language commonly used at their home. His relationship with his father was stressful, as Karl Arlt was a very severe and austere man, by Arlt's own account. The memory of his oppressive father would appear in several of his writings. For example, Remo Erdosain (a character at least partially based on Arlt's own life) often recalls his abusive father and how little if any support he would give him. After being expelled from school at the age of eight, Arlt became an autodidact and worked at all sorts of different odd jobs before landing a job on at a local newspaper: as clerk at a bookstore, apprentice to a tinsmith, painter, mechanic, welder, manager in a brick factory, and dock worker. His first novel, El juguete rabioso (1926) (‘Mad Toy‘), was the semi-autobiographical story of Silvio, a dropout who goes through a series of adventures trying to be ‘somebody.’ Narrated by Silvio's older self, the novel reflects the energy and chaos of the early 20th century in Buenos Aires. The narrator's literary and sometimes poetic language contrasts sharply with the street-level slang of Mad Toy's many colorful characters. Arlt's second novel, the popular Los siete locos (The Seven Madmen) was rough, brutal, colloquial and surreal, a complete break from the polite, middle-class literature more typical of Argentine literature (as exemplified, perhaps, by the work of Jorge Luis Borges, however innovative his work was in other respects). Los lanzallamas (The Flame-Throwers) was the sequel, and these two novels together are thought by many to be his greatest work. What followed were a series of short stories and plays in which Arlt pursued his vision of bizarre, half-mad, alienated characters pursuing insane quests in a landscape of urban chaos. In 1932 he published El amor brujo. During his lifetime, however, Arlt was best known for his ‘Aguafuertes’ (‘Etchings’), the result of his contributions as a columnist - between 1928 and 1942 - to the Buenos Aires daily ‘El Mundo‘. Arlt used these columns to comment, in his characteristically forthright and unpretentious style, on the peculiarities, hypocrisies, strangeness and beauty of everyday life in Argentina's capital. These articles included occasional exposés of public institutions, such as the juvenile justice system (‘Escuela primaria de delincuencia’, 26–29 September 1932) or the Public Health System. Some of the ‘Aguafuertes’ were collected in two volumes under the titles Secretos femeninos. Aguafuertes inéditas and Tratado de delincuencia. Aguafuertes inéditas which were edited by Sergio Olguín and published by Ediciones 12 and Página/12 in 1996. Between March and May 1930, Arlt wrote a series of ‘Aguafuertes’ as a correspondent to ‘El Mundo’ in Rio de Janeiro. In 1935 he spent nearly a year writing as he traveled throughout Spain and North Africa, on the eve of the Spanish Civil War. At the time of his death, Arlt was hoping to be sent to the United States as a correspondent. Worn out and exhausted after a lifetime of hardships, he died from a stroke on July 26, 1942. His coffin was lowered from his apartment by an operated crane, an ironic end, considering his bizarre stories. Arlt has been massively influential on Latin American literature, including the 1960s ‘Boom’ generation of writers such as Gabriel García Márquez. Analogues in English literature are those who avoid literary 'respectability' by writing about the poor, the criminal and the mad: writers like William Burroughs, Iceberg Slim, and Irvine Welsh. Arlt, however, predated all of them. He is widely considered to be one of the founders of the modern Argentine novel; among those contemporary writers who claim to have been influenced by Arlt are Abelardo Castillo, Ricardo Piglia and César Aira. At least two Argentine movies were based on his novels, Los siete locos (1974) and El juguete rabioso (1985). Michele McKay Aynesworth is Assistant Professor of English at Huston-Tillotson College.
Arlt, Roberto. The Seven Madmen. Boston. 1984. Godine. 087923492x. Translated from the Spanish by Naomi Lindstrom. 275 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration by Dennis Corrigan. Jacket calligraphy by Richard Lipton

Here, for the first time in English, is a seminal masterpiece of Latin American literature: Roberto Arlt’s novel, THE SEVEN MADMEN, a swirling story as vital today as when it first exploded in Buenos Aires. Behind the flood of recent Latin American novels, behind Borges, Márquez, Fuentes, Sábato, and others, lies the work of Roberto Arlt, who died in 1942. THE SEVEN MADMEN, written in the years Joyce was bringing out Ulysses piecemeal, and first published in 1929, is a fundamental modern book. Arlt said of his novel, in one of those deft ironical ripostes artists sometimes use to deflect questions about their work, that in it he has ‘done nothing more than reproduce a state of anarchy latent in the breast of every misfit or crackpot.’ Remo Erdosain, a bill collector, has embezzled six hundred pesos and six centavos. On the same day he is found out, his wife leaves him. Demoralized, frantic for someone to front him the money he needs to avoid jail, he falls in with a revolutionary plot led by the Astrologer, a weird and muddled fanatic. The proposed scheme - a terrorist conspiracy to help the unemployed that will lure workers to mountain stronghold factories and enslave them - is mad but plausible. For start-up capital, a chain of bordellos is proposed. To finance these, the murder of Erdosain’s wife’s rich cousin is planned. But to summarize even part of the plot of this bizarre masterwork trivializes it. The book swirls, coils, sets off bombs in the mind. THE SEVEN MADMEN has long since taken its rightful place in European letters; it has been translated into several major European languages. To publish it at last in a fine American translation is an homage to a great writer and a belated gift to English-speaking readers the world around. ‘If ever a writer of genius lived in our part of the world, his name was Roberto Arlt . . . All Buenos Aires, at the very least, read THE SEVEN MADMEN. The intellectuals turned from their dry martinis to shrug and intone piously that Arlt didn’t know how to write. He didn’t, it’s true, and he disdained the language of the Mandarins; but he knew and worked the language and problems of millions of Argentines. Arlt translated Dostoevsky into the street slang of Buenos Aires.’ - Juan Carlos Onetti. ‘Somehow Arlt and I were always alone each with the other, and during my youth I read him passionately. There was a vital hook- up between author and reader, a reader who came to be an author, too, and who wishes he’d had the chance to have Arlt read his work, even if it might mean the famous, terrible yell, ‘Get out of here, you bum!’ - Julio Cortázar. ‘I’m on the streets of Buenos Aires, saying ‘This is the street the Melancholy Ruffian walked down, on this block is one of the seedy boarding houses where Hipólita, the Cross-Eyed Girl, or Erdosain ended up.’ If there’s one person in my country I feel close to, it’s Roberto Arlt. His characters keep on having the same immediacy and impact that made me suffer along with them back then . . . . Arlt’s love of the extreme, evident from the first page of the book, is the one great driving force that builds inexorably, keeping the dramatic tension high, so that the characters seize hold of the reader as if they held him in the grips of demonic possession.’ - Julio Cortazar on THE SEVEN MADMEN. ‘Roberto Arlt’s THE SEVEN MADMEN is one of those books that went unrecognized at the time of its publishing and then proved to be the seed of a very large and bountiful tree that gave its full fruits in the sixties and seventies in Latin America. . . One might say that the modern fiction of Latin America has its beginnings with two rather obscure Uruguayan writers, Horacio Quiroga and Felisberto Hernandez, then springs forth, or rather pounces like a tiger, with Arlt, then finds its fuller expression with the works of Borges, Asturias, and Carpentier. The true children of Arlt will be Cortazar, Onetti, and then, of course, the younger writers in the continent.’ - Carlos Fuentes.

Roberto Arlt (1900–1942) was an Argentine writer. He was born Roberto Godofredo Christophersen Arlt in Buenos Aires on April 2, 1900. His parents were both immigrants: his father Karl Arlt was a Prussian from Posen (now Poznan in present-day Poland) and his mother was Ekatherine Iobstraibitzer, a native of Trieste and Italian speaking. German was the language commonly used at their home. His relationship with his father was stressful, as Karl Arlt was a very severe and austere man, by Arlt's own account. The memory of his oppressive father would appear in several of his writings. For example, Remo Erdosain (a character at least partially based on Arlt's own life) often recalls his abusive father and how little if any support he would give him. After being expelled from school at the age of eight, Arlt became an autodidact and worked at all sorts of different odd jobs before landing a job on at a local newspaper: as clerk at a bookstore, apprentice to a tinsmith, painter, mechanic, welder, manager in a brick factory, and dock worker. His first novel, El juguete rabioso (1926) (‘Mad Toy‘), was the semi-autobiographical story of Silvio, a dropout who goes through a series of adventures trying to be ‘somebody.’ Narrated by Silvio's older self, the novel reflects the energy and chaos of the early 20th century in Buenos Aires. The narrator's literary and sometimes poetic language contrasts sharply with the street-level slang of Mad Toy's many colorful characters. Arlt's second novel, the popular Los siete locos (The Seven Madmen) was rough, brutal, colloquial and surreal, a complete break from the polite, middle-class literature more typical of Argentine literature (as exemplified, perhaps, by the work of Jorge Luis Borges, however innovative his work was in other respects). Los lanzallamas (The Flame-Throwers) was the sequel, and these two novels together are thought by many to be his greatest work. What followed were a series of short stories and plays in which Arlt pursued his vision of bizarre, half-mad, alienated characters pursuing insane quests in a landscape of urban chaos. In 1932 he published El amor brujo. During his lifetime, however, Arlt was best known for his ‘Aguafuertes’ (‘Etchings’), the result of his contributions as a columnist - between 1928 and 1942 - to the Buenos Aires daily ‘El Mundo‘. Arlt used these columns to comment, in his characteristically forthright and unpretentious style, on the peculiarities, hypocrisies, strangeness and beauty of everyday life in Argentina's capital. These articles included occasional exposés of public institutions, such as the juvenile justice system (‘Escuela primaria de delincuencia’, 26–29 September 1932) or the Public Health System. Some of the ‘Aguafuertes’ were collected in two volumes under the titles Secretos femeninos. Aguafuertes inéditas and Tratado de delincuencia. Aguafuertes inéditas which were edited by Sergio Olguín and published by Ediciones 12 and Página/12 in 1996. Between March and May 1930, Arlt wrote a series of ‘Aguafuertes’ as a correspondent to ‘El Mundo’ in Rio de Janeiro. In 1935 he spent nearly a year writing as he traveled throughout Spain and North Africa, on the eve of the Spanish Civil War. At the time of his death, Arlt was hoping to be sent to the United States as a correspondent. Worn out and exhausted after a lifetime of hardships, he died from a stroke on July 26, 1942. His coffin was lowered from his apartment by an operated crane, an ironic end, considering his bizarre stories. Arlt has been massively influential on Latin American literature, including the 1960s ‘Boom’ generation of writers such as Gabriel García Márquez. Analogues in English literature are those who avoid literary 'respectability' by writing about the poor, the criminal and the mad: writers like William Burroughs, Iceberg Slim, and Irvine Welsh. Arlt, however, predated all of them. He is widely considered to be one of the founders of the modern Argentine novel; among those contemporary writers who claim to have been influenced by Arlt are Abelardo Castillo, Ricardo Piglia and César Aira. At least two Argentine movies were based on his novels, Los siete locos (1974) and El juguete rabioso (1985).
Arlt, Roberto. The Seven Madmen. London. 1998. Serpent's Tail/UNESCO Publishing. 185242592x. Translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor. 249 pages. paperback. Cover: Oscar Zarate

First published in 1929. THE SEVEN MADMEN perfectly captures the conflict of Argentine society at a crucial moment in its history. Arlt’s exploration of the still mysterious city of Buenos Aires, its street slang, crowded tenements, crazy juxtapositions, and anguish are at the core of this novel. In this seething, hostile city, Erdosain wanders the streets, trying to decipher the teeming life going on behind dark doors. He searches, literally, for his soul which is causing him so much pain, wondering what it might look like. This translation of Arlt’s masterpiece makes available to English - speaking audiences the work of a writer who is the founder of the contemporary Latin American novel and a giant of 20th - century literature. ‘If great means anything at all, then Arlt is surely a great writer . . . He is Latin America’s first truly urban novelist. . . This is the power which inspired literature possesses’ - Martin Seymour-Smith .

Roberto Arlt (1900–1942) was an Argentine writer. He was born Roberto Godofredo Christophersen Arlt in Buenos Aires on April 2, 1900. His parents were both immigrants: his father Karl Arlt was a Prussian from Posen (now Poznan in present-day Poland) and his mother was Ekatherine Iobstraibitzer, a native of Trieste and Italian speaking. German was the language commonly used at their home. His relationship with his father was stressful, as Karl Arlt was a very severe and austere man, by Arlt's own account. The memory of his oppressive father would appear in several of his writings. For example, Remo Erdosain (a character at least partially based on Arlt's own life) often recalls his abusive father and how little if any support he would give him. After being expelled from school at the age of eight, Arlt became an autodidact and worked at all sorts of different odd jobs before landing a job on at a local newspaper: as clerk at a bookstore, apprentice to a tinsmith, painter, mechanic, welder, manager in a brick factory, and dock worker. His first novel, El juguete rabioso (1926) (‘Mad Toy‘), was the semi-autobiographical story of Silvio, a dropout who goes through a series of adventures trying to be ‘somebody.’ Narrated by Silvio's older self, the novel reflects the energy and chaos of the early 20th century in Buenos Aires. The narrator's literary and sometimes poetic language contrasts sharply with the street-level slang of Mad Toy's many colorful characters. Arlt's second novel, the popular Los siete locos (The Seven Madmen) was rough, brutal, colloquial and surreal, a complete break from the polite, middle-class literature more typical of Argentine literature (as exemplified, perhaps, by the work of Jorge Luis Borges, however innovative his work was in other respects). Los lanzallamas (The Flame-Throwers) was the sequel, and these two novels together are thought by many to be his greatest work. What followed were a series of short stories and plays in which Arlt pursued his vision of bizarre, half-mad, alienated characters pursuing insane quests in a landscape of urban chaos. In 1932 he published El amor brujo. During his lifetime, however, Arlt was best known for his ‘Aguafuertes’ (‘Etchings’), the result of his contributions as a columnist - between 1928 and 1942 - to the Buenos Aires daily ‘El Mundo‘. Arlt used these columns to comment, in his characteristically forthright and unpretentious style, on the peculiarities, hypocrisies, strangeness and beauty of everyday life in Argentina's capital. These articles included occasional exposés of public institutions, such as the juvenile justice system (‘Escuela primaria de delincuencia’, 26–29 September 1932) or the Public Health System. Some of the ‘Aguafuertes’ were collected in two volumes under the titles Secretos femeninos. Aguafuertes inéditas and Tratado de delincuencia. Aguafuertes inéditas which were edited by Sergio Olguín and published by Ediciones 12 and Página/12 in 1996. Between March and May 1930, Arlt wrote a series of ‘Aguafuertes’ as a correspondent to ‘El Mundo’ in Rio de Janeiro. In 1935 he spent nearly a year writing as he traveled throughout Spain and North Africa, on the eve of the Spanish Civil War. At the time of his death, Arlt was hoping to be sent to the United States as a correspondent. Worn out and exhausted after a lifetime of hardships, he died from a stroke on July 26, 1942. His coffin was lowered from his apartment by an operated crane, an ironic end, considering his bizarre stories. Arlt has been massively influential on Latin American literature, including the 1960s ‘Boom’ generation of writers such as Gabriel García Márquez. Analogues in English literature are those who avoid literary 'respectability' by writing about the poor, the criminal and the mad: writers like William Burroughs, Iceberg Slim, and Irvine Welsh. Arlt, however, predated all of them. He is widely considered to be one of the founders of the modern Argentine novel; among those contemporary writers who claim to have been influenced by Arlt are Abelardo Castillo, Ricardo Piglia and César Aira. At least two Argentine movies were based on his novels, Los siete locos (1974) and El juguete rabioso (1985).
Armand, Octavio (editor). Toward An Image of Latin American Poetry. Durango. 1982. Logbridge-Rhodes. 0937406090. 176 pages. hardcover.

For this anthology texts have been selected from only eleven poets. That is, in order to prevent the selection from becoming the pretense for a catalog, it was limited to poets who, in spite of a well defined if not definitive work, are not sufficiently known in the United States. Of course many names are missing. The version of Latin American poetry that is becoming established in the United States corresponds to provisional, circumstantial criteria, only in this way is it possible to understand the partiality and/or mediocrity with which our poetry is (re)presented. Couldn’t there be a bit of colonialism here, as if reading were an additional act of tourism? CONTENTS: Introduction; José Lezama Lima/Translated by Willis Barnstone; Enrique Molina/Translated by Naomi Lindstrom; Juan Liscano/Translated by Thomas Hoeksema; Gonzalo Rojas/Translated by Christopher Maurer; Alberto Girri/Translated by Christopher Maurer; Javier Sologuren/Translated by Mary Barnard & Willis Barnstone; Juan Sanchez Peláez/Translated by Naomi Lindstrom; Alvaro Mutis I Translated by Luis Harss; Lorenzo Garcia Vega/Translated by Thomas Koeksema; Marco Antonio Montes de Oca/Translated by Mary Barnard & Willis Barnstone;Alejandra Pizarnik/Translated by Lynne Alvarez.

Octavio Armand (b. 1946, Guantánamo) is a critic, poet, translator and founder and director of the literary magazine Escandalar. Armand’s books include the poetry collections Biografía para reacios, Cosas pasan, Superficies, Oregami, El pez folado and Son de ausencia. Refractions, published in 1994, includes essays as well as poems. (Cintas for literature, 1977-78).
Armand, Octavio. With Dusk. Durango. 1984. Logbridge-Rhodes. Translated from the Spanish by Carol Maier. 48 pages. paperback.

Poetry from a noted Cuban poet. CONTENTS: Poêtica num tantos/One of Many Poetics; Amaneciendo/Day Breaking; El Vaso de Rubin/Rubin’s Vase; Braille para mano izquierda/Braille for Left Hand; Sueno de ciego/Blind Man’s Dream; Otra poética/Another Poetics; Cómo escribir con erizo/Writing with Sea Urchin; El disco de Festo/The Phaistos Disk; Poema con piel/Poem with Skin; Poema con anochecer/Poem with Dusk; Longmeadoe/Longmeadow; Acuarela/Water Color; A buen entendedor/A Word to the Wise; Biographical notes. . OCTAVIO ARMAND was born in Cuba on May 10, 1946, into a family twice exiled: once, in 1958, under Batista, and subsequently under Castro in 1960. Armand has lived in New York City through this second exile. The prolific output of poems and essays which has afforded him a warm critical reception throughout Latin America began in 1970 with the publication of Horizonte no es siempre lejania. This collection was followed by five others in verse, most recently Coma escribir con erizo (1979) and Biografia para feacios (1980), and by three books of essays: Superficies (1980), Hacer la tradicion (1984), and El bisonte de Niaux (1984). The critic Juan Antonio Vasco has recently published the first book-length study of Armand’s work, entitled Conversacion con la esfinge. Armand is founder and editor of the Spanish-language literary journal escandalar, and has also edited an anthology of Latin American poetry, published in 1982 by Logbridge-Rhodes under the title Toward An Image of Latin American Poetry. The present collection, With Dusk, is Armand’s first book in English translation. . CAROL MAIER is an Associate Professor of Spanish at Bradley University. Her translations of Octavio Armand’s poems have appeared in a number of journals, among them Review, Boundary 2, Nimrod, International Poetry Review and the New Orleans Review, as well as in the 1981 and 1983 editions of the Anthology of Magazine Verse and Yearbook of American Poetry. Maier has also translated a chapbook of poems by the Chicana poet Ana Castillo (Cross Cultural Communications, 1984), and is currently translating Octavio Armand’s selected essays. . Originally published in Spanish in 1984. .

Octavio Armand (b. 1946, Guantánamo) is a critic, poet, translator and founder and director of the literary magazine Escandalar. Armand’s books include the poetry collections Biografía para reacios, Cosas pasan, Superficies, Oregami, El pez folado and Son de ausencia. Refractions, published in 1994, includes essays as well as poems. (Cintas for literature, 1977-78).
Armstrong, Robert and Shenk, Janet. El Salvador: The Face of Revolution. Boston. 1982. South End Press. 0896081370. 284 pages. paperback. Cover design by Liz Mestres

Two of the leading U.S. experts on Central America provide the definitive study of the history and reality of the situation in El Salvador through the early 1980s.

Robert Armstrong lived in El Salvador from 1967 to 1969, as a member of the Peace Corps. He has written extensively on Central America for NACLA's Report on the Americas and the Guardian, and has been active in human rights and solidarity organizations concerned with El Salvador since 1977. A graduate of Denison University and Rutgers University Law School, he is currently a staff member at the North American Congress on Latin America in New York. Janet Shenk is a graduate of Smith College and received her master's degree in economics from the New School for Social Research. She has travelled extensively in Central America and South America over the last ten years, and worked in Ecuador from 1971 to 1974 as a Fulbright fellow and consultant to Ecuador's Ministry of Economic Planning. She is currently on the staff of the North American Congress on Latin America.
Arredondo, Ines. Underground River and Other Stories. Lincoln. 1996. University Of Nebraska Press. 0803210345. Foreword by Elena Poniatowska. Translated from the Spanish by Cynthia Steele. 128 pages. hardcover.

Ines Arredondo (1928-1989) published just three slim volumes of stories over twenty-three years, yet her reputation as a great writer, 'a necessary writer', is firmly established in Mexico. Her works dwell on obsessions: erotic love, evil, purity, perversion, prostitution, tragic separation, and death. Most of her characters are involved in ill-fated searches for the Absolute through both excessively passionate and sadomasochistic relationships. Inevitably, the perfect, pure dyad of two youthful lovers is interrupted or corrupted through the interference of a third party (a rival lover or a child), aging, death, or public morality. Set at the beginning of the twentieth century in the tropical northwestern Mexican state of Sinaloa, the stories collected in "Underground River and Other Stories" focus on female subjectivity. Arredondo's adult male characters are often predators, depraved collectors of adolescent virgins, like the plantation owners in "The Nocturnal Butterflies" and "Shadows in the Shadows" and the dying uncle in "The Shunammite", who is kept alive by incestuous lust. Since the young female protagonists rarely have fathers to protect them, the only thing standing between them and these lechers are older women. Perversely, these older women act as accomplices-along with the extended family and the Roman Catholic Church-in the sordid age-old traffic in women. "Underground River and Other Stories" is the first appearance of Arredondo's stories in English. Cynthia Steele is an associate professor of Romance languages at the University of Washington and the author of "Politics, Gender, and the Mexican Novel", "1968-1988: Beyond the Pyramid". Elena Poniatowska, who helped Steele choose these stories, is one of the most renowned of Mexico's new generation of writers. Among her works translated into English are "Frida Kahlo: The Camera Seduced", "Massacre in Mexico", and "Dear Diego". CONTENTS: Introduction by Cynthia Steele; Foreword by Elena Poniatowska; The Shunammite; Mariana; The Sign; New Year’s Eve; Underground River; The Silent Words; Orphanhood; The Nocturnal Butterfly; The Brothers; The Mirrors; On Love; Shadow in the Shadows.

Inés Arredondo (1928-1989) was the most important Mexican woman short-story writer of the twentieth century. She published just three slim volumes of stories over a period of twenty-three years, yet her reputation as a great writer, ‘a necessary writer,’ is firmly established in Mexico. Her works dwell on a few central obsessions: erotic love, evil, purity, perversion, prostitution, tragic separation, and death. Most of her characters are involved in ill-fated searches for the absolute, through both excessively passionate and sadomasochistic relationships. Inevitably the perfect, pure dyad of two youthful lovers is interrupted or corrupted, through the interference of a third party (a rival lover or a child - ‘Great lovers don’t have children’), aging, death, or public morality (in the cases of incest and homosexuality). Time and again, excess - whether of love, passion, possessiveness, or narcissism-has tragic consequences for both the lovers and the innocent people around them. Arredondo wrote sparingly, publishing little more than thirty short stories in twenty-three years. She once told an interviewer that she waited for the holy ghost to spit on her as a sign that she should write a new story; but since he was a ghost, he didn’t have much saliva. She told me that one of her most enigmatic stories, ‘The Brothers,’ a dreamlike reflection on passion, female virginity, and male honor, was dictated to her by a voice in the shower. ‘Shadow in the Shadows,’ in which she explored every conceivable sort of sexual perversion in order to demonstrate the impossibility of distinguishing between purity and prostitution, came to her as she sat sipping coffee under the arches on the idyllic main plaza in Oaxaca. Despite the brevity of Arredondo’s work, her elegant, crystalline style and her disturbing, highly original vision of the human condition, and of gender and power relations in northern Mexico at the beginning of the twentieth century, establish her as one of contemporary Mexico’s most significant authors.
Arreola, Juan Jose. Confabulario and Other Inventions. Austin. 1964. University Of Texas Press. Illustrated by Kelly Fearing. Translated from the Spanish by George D. Schade. 245 pages. hardcover. Cover: Kelly Fearing

This biting commentary on the follies of man by a noted Mexican author cuts deeply, yet leaves the reader laughing - at himself as well as at his neighbors. With his surgical intelligence, Juan José Arreola exposes the shams and hypocrisies, the false values and vices, the hidden diseases of society. CONFABULARIO TOTAL, 1941-1961, of which this book is a translation, combines three earlier books - Varia Invención (1949), Confabulario (1952), Punta de Plata (1958) - and numerous new pieces. The glittering satire of CONFABULARIO TOTAL is expressed in a veritable smorgasbord of literary forms - short stories, fables, vignettes, parodies, diaries, sketches, letters. Some of the author’s assaults on the almost infinite ability of human beings to rationalize are frontal and obvious; some are devious and subtle; some aie surprise sallies aimed at unsuspected weak spots in the human defense. The kind of language used by Arreola also makes its contribution to effective expression of his attitudes - his detestation of human frailties and his scornful view of many human relationships - as, by turns, it bites, stings, slashes, rasps with ironic irritation, devastates with an unanswerable and disdainful laugh, soothes, persuades with an artful grin. The strategy is always effective, the style delightful. Although some of the pieces have a noticeably Mexican orientation, most of them transcend strictly regional themes to interpret the social scene in aspects common to all civilized cultures. Arreola’s view is not limited; much of his sophistication comes from his broad, deep, and varied knowledge of present and past, and from his almost casual use both of this knowledge and of his insight into its meaning for mankind. His familiarity with many generally little-known arts and sciences, numerous literatures, history, anthropology, and psychology, and his telling allusions to this rich lode of fact increase the reader’s delight in his learned but witty, scalding but poetic, satire. . One of the group of talented contemporary Mexican writers who have greatly enriched Mexican literature, Arreola has made his own unique contribution, a contribution fully represented in this volume. . Professor George D. Schade, of the Department of Romance Languages at the University of Texas, now has a share in this contribution, too - as translator of Confabulario Total, 1941-1961. In the creative act of transferring a literary artist’s thought from his own language to that of a foreign people Professor Schade has manifested the essential qualities of the translator as creative artist: perceptiveness, imagination, breadth of sympathy, literary skill. Kelly Fearing, noted Southwestern artist and Professor of Art at the University of Texas, has provided the illustrations. The Arreola-Schade-Fearing combination is a delightful experience for the sophisticated reader.

Juan José Arreola Zúñiga (September 21, 1918 – December 3, 2001) was a Mexican writer and academic. He is considered Mexico's premier experimental short story writer of the twentieth century. Arreola is recognized as one of the first Latin American writers to abandon realism; he uses elements of fantasy to underscore existentialist and absurdist ideas in his work. Although he is little known outside his native country, Arreola has served as the literary inspiration for a legion of Mexican writers who have sought to transform their country's realistic literary tradition by introducing elements of magical realism, satire, and allegory. Alongside Jorge Luis Borges, he is considered one of the masters of the hybrid subgenre of the essay-story. He published only one novel, La feria (The Fair; 1963). Arreola was born in Ciudad Guzmán, in the state of Jalisco. He was the fourth son out of fourteen of Felipe Arreola and Victoria Zúñiga. In 1930, he began working as a bookbinder, which led to a series of other jobs. In 1937, he relocated to Mexico City, where he entered the Theatrical School of Fine Arts (Escuela Teatral de Bellas Artes).He later was found to be related to JOSE ALFREDO ZUNIGA. In 1941, while working as a professor, he published his first work, Sueño de Navidad (‘Christmas Dream’). In 1942 he also wrote a short story called ‘Un Pacto con el Diablo’ (‘A Pact with the Devil’). In 1943, while working as a journalist, he published his second work, Hizo el bien mientras vivió (‘He did well as long as he lived’). In 1945, he collaborated with Juan Rulfo and Antonio Alatorre to publish the literary journal Pan. Shortly afterward, he traveled to Paris at the invitation of Louis Jouvet. During this time, he became acquainted with Jean-Louis Barrault and Pierre Renoir. A year later he returned to Mexico. In 1948, he worked as an editor for the journal Fondo de Cultura Económica, and obtained a grant from El Colegio de México. His first collection of short stories, Varia invención, was published in 1949. Around 1950, he began collaborating on the anthology Los Presentes, and received a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation. In 1952, Arreola published Confabulario, widely considered to be his first great work. It was awarded the Jalisco Literary Prize in 1953. The following year, Arreola published La hora de todos. The year after that, he published a revised Confabulario and won the Premio del Festival Dramático from the National Institute of Fine Arts. In 1958, he published Punta de plata, and in 1962, Confabulario total. In 1962, he published The Switchman (El Guardagujas). In 1959 he was the founding director of the Casa del Lago, the first off-campus Cultural Center of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, now called the Casa del Lago Juan José Arreola. In 1963, he received the Xavier Villaurrutia Prize. The same year, he published La feria, a work dense with references to his native Zapotlán, which would be remembered as one of his finest literary accomplishments. The following year, he edited the anthologies Los Presentes and El Unicornio, and became a professor at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. In 1967, he appeared in the controversial Alejandro Jodorowsky film Fando y Lis, which was eventually banned in Mexico. In 1969, Arreola was recognized by the José Clemente Orozco Cultural Group of Ciudad Guzmán. In 1971, Confabulario, Palindroma, La feria, and Varia invención were republished as part of a series of his greatest works, Obras de Juan José Arreola. Around 1972, he published Bestiario, a follow-up to 1958's Punta de plata. The following year, he published La palabra educación, and in 1976, Inventario. In 1979, he received the National Prize in Letters (Premio Nacional en Letras) in Mexico City. In 1989, he was awarded the Jalisco Prize in Letters and in 1992 the Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe Juan Rulfo Prize. In 1997, he received the Alfonso Reyes Prize; and in 1998, the Ramón López Velarde Prize. In 1999, on his eightieth birthday, he was named favorite son of Guadalajara.
Arreola, Juan Jose. The Fair. Austin. 1977. University Of Texas Press. 0292724179. Illustrations by Barbara Whitehead. Translated from the Spanish by John Upton. 154 pages. hardcover. Cover: Illustrations by Barbara Whitehead

This wry and remarkable book is unique in modern Latin American fiction. Although THE FAIR must be defined as a novel, it is in fact a variegated fabric of interwoven stories, vignettes, lamentations, sardonic observations, confessions, diatribes, documentary fragments, and still lifes. The warp that supports this tapestry is the fictional Mexican town of Zapotlán, which is also the original name of Ciudad Guzmán, Jalisco, where Arreola was born in 1918. The Fair contains eight narrative themes, which rise to the surface and fall again into the background like figures in a fugue: the Indians’ unending struggle to reclaim their lands; the ill-starred career of a shoemaker turned corn farmer; the death of a moneylender; the removal of the town’s whore houses to a zone of tolerance; an earthquake; the local Atheneum’s dogged pursuit of Culture; the building of the largest cast/I/o ever seen; and the troubled celebration in honor of Zapotlán’s patron, the Patriarch Saint Joseph. Like FINNEGANS WAKE, THE FAIR is a gallery of voices, an oral history. Events are related in brief, nonsequential bursts by speakers who are variously angry, amused, wistful, cynical, desperate, or drunk. Texas Pan American Series. Arreola, one of Mexico’s most important contemporary writers, is a skillful satirist who takes a gloomy view of the antics of the human animal. His style is terse, forceful, and often comic. John Upton also translated Cumboto, Jarano, San José de Gracia, and IN THE MAGIC LAND OF PEYOTE for the University of Texas Press.

Juan José Arreola Zúñiga (September 21, 1918 – December 3, 2001) was a Mexican writer and academic. He is considered Mexico's premier experimental short story writer of the twentieth century. Arreola is recognized as one of the first Latin American writers to abandon realism; he uses elements of fantasy to underscore existentialist and absurdist ideas in his work. Although he is little known outside his native country, Arreola has served as the literary inspiration for a legion of Mexican writers who have sought to transform their country's realistic literary tradition by introducing elements of magical realism, satire, and allegory. Alongside Jorge Luis Borges, he is considered one of the masters of the hybrid subgenre of the essay-story. He published only one novel, La feria (The Fair; 1963). Arreola was born in Ciudad Guzmán, in the state of Jalisco. He was the fourth son out of fourteen of Felipe Arreola and Victoria Zúñiga. In 1930, he began working as a bookbinder, which led to a series of other jobs. In 1937, he relocated to Mexico City, where he entered the Theatrical School of Fine Arts (Escuela Teatral de Bellas Artes).He later was found to be related to JOSE ALFREDO ZUNIGA. In 1941, while working as a professor, he published his first work, Sueño de Navidad (‘Christmas Dream’). In 1942 he also wrote a short story called ‘Un Pacto con el Diablo’ (‘A Pact with the Devil’). In 1943, while working as a journalist, he published his second work, Hizo el bien mientras vivió (‘He did well as long as he lived’). In 1945, he collaborated with Juan Rulfo and Antonio Alatorre to publish the literary journal Pan. Shortly afterward, he traveled to Paris at the invitation of Louis Jouvet. During this time, he became acquainted with Jean-Louis Barrault and Pierre Renoir. A year later he returned to Mexico. In 1948, he worked as an editor for the journal Fondo de Cultura Económica, and obtained a grant from El Colegio de México. His first collection of short stories, Varia invención, was published in 1949. Around 1950, he began collaborating on the anthology Los Presentes, and received a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation. In 1952, Arreola published Confabulario, widely considered to be his first great work. It was awarded the Jalisco Literary Prize in 1953. The following year, Arreola published La hora de todos. The year after that, he published a revised Confabulario and won the Premio del Festival Dramático from the National Institute of Fine Arts. In 1958, he published Punta de plata, and in 1962, Confabulario total. In 1962, he published The Switchman (El Guardagujas). In 1959 he was the founding director of the Casa del Lago, the first off-campus Cultural Center of the National Autonomous University of Mexico, now called the Casa del Lago Juan José Arreola. In 1963, he received the Xavier Villaurrutia Prize. The same year, he published La feria, a work dense with references to his native Zapotlán, which would be remembered as one of his finest literary accomplishments. The following year, he edited the anthologies Los Presentes and El Unicornio, and became a professor at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. In 1967, he appeared in the controversial Alejandro Jodorowsky film Fando y Lis, which was eventually banned in Mexico. In 1969, Arreola was recognized by the José Clemente Orozco Cultural Group of Ciudad Guzmán. In 1971, Confabulario, Palindroma, La feria, and Varia invención were republished as part of a series of his greatest works, Obras de Juan José Arreola. Around 1972, he published Bestiario, a follow-up to 1958's Punta de plata. The following year, he published La palabra educación, and in 1976, Inventario. In 1979, he received the National Prize in Letters (Premio Nacional en Letras) in Mexico City. In 1989, he was awarded the Jalisco Prize in Letters and in 1992 the Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe Juan Rulfo Prize. In 1997, he received the Alfonso Reyes Prize; and in 1998, the Ramón López Velarde Prize. In 1999, on his eightieth birthday, he was named favorite son of Guadalajara.
Arriaga, Pablo Joseph de. The Extirpation of Idolatry in Peru. Lexington, Kentucky. 1968. University of Kentucky Press. Edited and translated L. Clark Keating. 192 pages.

Based on manuscript of 1621. Includes a glossary of Quechua words.

Pablo José Arriaga or Pablo José Arriga (Vergara, Biscay, 1564 – died at sea, 1622) was a Spanish Jesuit missionary in South America. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1579, and in 1585 went to Peru, where he was ordained. In 1588 he was appointed rector of the College of San Martin at Lima, which post he filled thrice in the course of twenty-four years. He visited Europe in 1601, sent to Rome by his superiors. Returning in 1604, he became Rector of the College of Arequipa, (1612–15). It was during the period from 1604 to 1622 that Father Arriaga became identified with the task of uprooting the survivals of indigenous religion in Peru. He accompanied one of the earliest official visitors, Father Fernando de Avendano. He also directed the construction of a college for sons of Indian caciques, and of a house of correction for Indian shamans. In 1620 he completed his Extirpacion de l'Idolatría en el Perú (Lima, 1621). The year following he was again sent to Europe on a confidential mission. Embarking at Portobelo, the fleet to which his vessel belonged was struck by a storm. His ship and four others were beached and wrecked. He also wrote an ecclesiastic rhetoric: Rhetoris Christiani partes septem: exemplis cum sacris tum philosophicis illustratae. Nunc primum in lucem prodeunt. Lyon, Sumptibus Horatij Cardon, 1619.
Arzans De Orsua Y Vela, Bartolome. Tales of Potosi. Providence. 1975. Brown University Press. 0870571443. Translated from the Spanish by Frances M. Lopez-Morillas. Edited, and with an Introduction by R. C. Padden. 209 pages. hardcover. Jacket illustration: detail from the first printed sketch of Potosi, in Pedro de Cieza de Leon's La cr?nica del Peril, Seville, 1553.

Spanish colonial life is shown in a new light in these robust tales, available in English for the first time, of the legendary era of the great South American silver center of Potosi, a seventeenth-century boom town ‘raised,’ according to one of its governors, ‘in pandemonium by greed at the foot of riches discovered by accident.’ In the seventeenth century, when the English settlement of North America was only beginning, Potosi had reached the peak of its amazing development, becoming one of the richest cities in the world and-although high above the Andean timberline-the most populous city in the Western Hemisphere. Along with the inevitable decline that ensued came tales of what had become a legendary past. In the eighteenth century Arzáns retold many of these tales with gusto in his monumental Historia de la Villa Imperial de Potosi, which, except for a few fragments, remained unpublished until 1965. Then appearing in three volumes in the original Spanish, it was said to be ‘like the great silver mountain of Potosi itself but full of riches of a quite different kind’ (TLS). Now these riches are available in a selection of tales translated from the original. Among them are accounts of the elaborate public ceremonies that took place on such occasions as the death of Philip II and the accession to the throne of Philip III. Most of the tales, however, are about the private lives of the Potosinos, as a sampling of the titles suggests: The Downfall of Don Francisco Chocata, The Adventures of the Warrior Maidens, A Virgin’s Revenge, The Salvation of Antonio Escorrón, Claudia the Witch, The Brief Engagement of Francisca Mirueña, The Reformation of Don Francisco Aguirre, and The Trials of Doña Teresa. Potosi, the Times Literary Supplement reviewer observed, was ‘a microcosm of the Spanish empire in America, and Arzãns, the meticulous annalist of a particular city, was no less a chronicler pf Spanish society in the New World.’ Tales of Potosi recreates that society-through the tales themselves and through the introduction. The latter, by R. C. Padden, a professor of history at Brown University, is in its own right a major contribution to Latin American studies.

Bartolomé de Arzáns Orzúa y Vela (1676-1736) was a writer and Spanish historian, born at the Villa Imperial de Potosí (within the ancient Viceroyalty of the Peru, in the territory then known as Alto Peru, which currently makes up the floor of the Bolivian nation) in 1676, and died in his place of origin in 1736. His name has been printed in the history of Latin American literature for being the author of a monumental literary and historiographical work which, under the title of history of the Villa Imperial de Potosí, turns him into one of the chroniclers more lucid and enjoyable of colonial literature written in the Spanish language.
Assis, Joaquim Machado de. Dom Casmurro. New York. 1994. Penguin Books. 0140446125. Translated from the Portuguese & With An Introduction by Robert Scott-Buccleuch. 216 pages. paperback. The cover shows a detail from a contemporary photograph of Gloria, Rio de Janiero reproduced by courtesy of Peter Owen Ltd.

DOM CASMURRO (1899) is the masterpiece of Brazil’s greatest novelist Machado de Assis The narrator Bentinho, now a taciturn lawyer, looks back and tells the story of the sweet anticipations of his youth, his childhood friendship and adolescent love affair with Capitu, their secret meetings and ardent pledges. Escaping from a career in the priesthood favoured by his mother, Bentinho pursued his true vocation in marriage to Capitu. But her infidelity, or so he perceived it, made the marriage a phantom edifice, ‘a castle in the air’. Assis is the master of a wonderfully subtle narrative art, vivid, discursive and enriched with many-layered irony. Like Othello, Bentinho may have been deluded by his own passionate jealousy, but this possibility merely gives a greater intensity to Assis’s tragedy of love and painful disillusionment. ‘Brazil’s greatest novelist. . . comparable with Stendhal or Sterne’ - V. S. Pritchett.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Dain Borges is a Professor of History at the University of California, San Diego and is author of The Family in Bahia. Carlos Felipe Moisés is a Brazilian poet and literary critic. Elizabeth Lowe is the author of The City in Brazilian Literature.
Assis, Joaquim Machado de. Esau and Jacob. New York. 2000. Oxford University Press. 0195108108. Translated from the Portuguese by Elizabeth Lowe. Edited and With A Foreword by Dain Borges. Afterword by Carlos Felipe Moises. Library of Latin America series. 276 pages. hardcover. Jacket painting by E.F. Schute, 'Paulo Alfonso Waterfall'.

From the time they were in their Mother’s womb, the Santos twins Pedro and Paulo were fierce rivals. They fought for the right to enter the world first, then competed to see who could suckle at the breast with greater hunger and determination. Soon politics entered their lives and stoked the fire of their antagonism. But it was not until they met Flora, the beautiful but ‘inexplicable’ daughter of a neighboring couple, that their lifelong rivalry found its greatest contest-and encountered its most profound suffering. ESAU AND JACOB, the fourth of Machado de Assis’s five great novels, braids meaning into many different levels. Here, the story of twin brothers in love with one woman intertwines with the story of Brazil itself, a country caught between the traditional and the modern and between monarchical and republican ideals. But in contrast to the heroic biblical pair of the title, Machado de Assis’s twin Sons have trouble escaping the petty squabbles, conflicting ambitions, doubts and insecurities that define the human condition and plague society. And so, with Machado de Assis charting their development, Pedro and Paulo live out the conflicts of a nation trying to reconcile itself with the inexorable demands of progress.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Dain Borges is a Professor of History at the University of California, San Diego and is author of The Family in Bahia. Carlos Felipe Moisés is a Brazilian poet and literary critic. Elizabeth Lowe is the author of The City in Brazilian Literature.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. A Chapter of Hats and Other Stories. London. 2008. Bloomsbury. 9780747594611. Translated from the Portuguese by and with an introduction by John Gledson. 275 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Sarah Morris

Machado de Assis (1839-1908) is the great Brazilian writer, author of Philosopher or Dog? and Epitaph of a Small Winner, whose work is admired by Salman Rushdie, Carlos Fuentes, Woody Allen, and Susan Sontag, among others. The stories in this book. many published in English for the first time, are taken from his mature period. They echo Poe and Gogol, anticipate Joyce, and have been compared to contemporary works by Chekhov, Maupassant and Henry James, yet they are not quite like any of these: they are - well - pure Machado de Assis. For example, two gentlemen standing outside a church in Rio de Janeiro see a respectable lady emerge - one of them has an unexpected, and to him inexplicable story to tell about her past life as a prostitute; a popular composer of polkas burns the midnight oil in a desperate attempt to create great classical music; a teenager finds himself captivated by the sight of the bare arms of an older woman who lives with his employer; an impoverished, lazy young man turns to the lucrative trade of catching runaway slaves; while the title story, beginning with a mock-heroic invocation (’Muse, sing of the anger of Mariana, the wife of the lawyer Conrado Seabra, that morning in April 1879’), tells of a bored wife who has a tiff with her husband about the hat he wears to work each day, and decides to go out on the town with a more daring, flirtatious friend to see what other ‘male and female hats’ get up to. John Gledson’s sparkling translations of a master story-writer are pure pleasure to read.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Born in Pôrto Alegre, Brazil, of American mother and Brazilian father, Albert I. Bagby, Jr., grew up speaking both Portuguese and English. After eighteen years in Brazil, he came to the United States and entered Baylor University. Following graduation from Baylor, he continued his studies at the universities of Missouri, where he received his M.A., at North Carolina, and at Vanderbilt University; in 1968 he received a doctoral degree in Spanish literature from the University of Kentucky. Presently Mr. Bagby is chairman of the Romance Languages Department at the University of Corpus Christi, Texas. Among his writing plans are translations of Assis’ three other early novels.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Counselor Ayres' Memorial. Berkeley. 1972. University Of California Press. 0520022270. Translated from the Portuguese by Helen Caldwell. 196 pages. hardcover.

This carefully crafted story, the last of Machado de Assis’ nine novels, is set in the Rio de Janeiro of 1888-1889, the tumultuous period of Brazil’s emancipation of the slaves. It is a sequel to his Esau and Jacob in that it too is a composition by the fictional Ayres, although its narrative revolves around another set of characters. It purports to be an excerpt from the diary in which the retired diplomat Ayres recorded his witty observations on his friends’ actions and on other events taking place around him in Rio. In particular, Ayres’ jottings follow the love story of a charming young widow, Fidelia, the daughter of a plantation-owner who cursed her and her first marriage (a comic Romeo-and-Juliet affair in Ayres’ version) to the son of a political enemy. Ayres, though he protests that he has no curiosity in his makeup, avidly follows the courtship of Fidelia by a young physician with political ambitions and observes her vain attempts to remain true to her dead Romeo, whose grave she has visited daily during the two years since his death. Paralleling the widow’s ‘resurrection from the dead’ to life and love is Ayres’ own regeneration as a human being-the rekindling of warmth in a heart that had grown cold pursuing a career in cold foreign climes. Retirement, he says, has restored him to himself. In addition to its literary excellence, the novel possesses biographical and historical interest. Both the widow and Ayres are aided in their return to love by the example and friendship of a loving couple, Carmo and Aguiar. Machado admitted to friends that Carmo was a portrait of his dead wife Carolina; Aguiar, we may assume, is a portrait of Assis himself. The widow’s emancipation from her bonds-to-the-dead and Ayres’ from the petty deceits and cynicism of his diplomatic career are reflected in Brazil’s actual emancipation of the slaves (proclaimed during the course of the novel, on May 13, 1888). Glimpses of plantation life and attitudes, rumors of the coming abolition, its arrival, and first effects appear as brief prose poems in the narrative. Machado was emotionally and intellectually equipped as perhaps no other man to present these scenes impartially and to infuse his account with the emotion that attended them. His happy story of a hopeful period in Brazilian history displays Machado de Assis at his most mellow and ingratiating.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. HELEN CALDWELL is Senior Lecturer in Classics, Emeritus of the University of California, Los Angeles. The University of California Press has published five of her previous books: The Brazilian Othello of Machado de Assis: A Study of Dom Casmurro (1960); Machado de Assis’s The Psychiatrist and Other Stories (co-translator with William L. Grossman, 1963), available in cloth and paperback editions; Esau and Jacob (a Machado translation, 1985); Dom Casmurro (a Machado translation, 1966); and Machado de Assis: The Brazilian Master and His Novels (1970). She was decorated in 1959 by the Brazilian government with the Order of the Southern Cross.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Dom Casmurro. New York. 1953. Noonday Press. Translated from the Portuguese by Helen Caldwell. 283 pages. hardcover. Cover: Format by Sidney Solomon

Considered by many Machado’s greatest work, DOM CASMURRO is a novel of love and suspected betrayal. It traces the flowering and destruction of a childhood romance. In Portuguese, casmurro means a morose, tight-lipped man, withdrawn within himself. Bento Santiago, hero and narrator of this novel, is such a person, ironically called ‘Dom Casmurro’ by his friends. The darkness and shadows of the present dissipate as Bento sketches his memories of youth. We are introduced to his childhood friend Capitu, (with her beautiful hair and ‘her eyes like the tide’) and we see her change from playmate to sweetheart. The dilemma of young love is made poignant through the efforts of the young people to resist Bento’s mother’s intention to make him a priest. The quarrels, the desire for each other, so clumsy and youthful, the complex evasion of adult watchfulness, are described so adroitly that the reader feels his own life being told. But Bento’s tragedy is already implicit in these apparently idyllic moments. He is a man born to be deceived or to deceive himself. The startlingly original denouement of this novel permits either interpretation. Those who read DOM CASMURRO will not easily forget it.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. The Translator, HELEN CALDWELL, is a member of the Department of Classics of the University of California. Her varied career includes such positions as lecturer on Anthropology for the Los Angeles Board of Education and dancer with Michio Ito and Company. She was awarded first prize in a translation contest sponsored by Mademoiselle in conjunction with the Committee on Cultural Relations with Latin America and the Pan-American Union.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Dom Casmurro. Berkeley. 1966. University Of California Press. Translated from the Portuguese and With An Introduction by Helen Caldwell. 269 pages. hardcover.

DOM CASMURRO, the carefully crafted story of the struggle between love and jealousy for possession of a man’s heart, is one of the finest works by the Brazilian writer Machado de Assis. The author has long been recognized as a master of Portuguese prose and the most original spirit to come out of Brazil’s rich, four-century-long literary tradition; DOM CASMURRO shows his genius at its finest flowering. This novel of love and suspected betrayal traces the flowering and destruction of a childhood romance. In Portuguese, casmurro means a morose, tight-lipped man, withdrawn within himself. Bento Santiago, hero and narrator of this novel, is such a person, ironically called ‘Dom Casmurro’ by his friends. The darkness and shadows of the present dissipate as Bento sketches his memories of youth. We are introduced to his childhood friend Capitu, (with her beautiful hair and ‘her eyes like the tide’) and we see her change from playmate to sweetheart. The dilemma of young love is made poignant through the efforts of the young people to resist Bento’s mother’s intention to make him a priest. The quarrels, the desire for each other, so clumsy and youthful, the complex evasion of adult watchfulness, are described so adroitly that the reader feels his own life being told. But Bento’s tragedy is already implicit in these apparently idyllic moments. He is a man born to be deceived or to deceive himself. The startlingly original denouement of this novel permits either interpretation. Those who read DOM CASMURRO will not easily forget it.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. The Translator, HELEN CALDWELL, is a member of the Department of Classics of the University of California. Her varied career includes such positions as lecturer on Anthropology for the Los Angeles Board of Education and dancer with Michio Ito and Company. She was awarded first prize in a translation contest sponsored by Mademoiselle in conjunction with the Committee on Cultural Relations with Latin America and the Pan-American Union. Format by Sidney Solomon.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Dom Casmurro. London. 1953. W. H. Allen. Translated from the Portuguese by Helen Caldwell. 240 pages. hardcover.

This novel is regarded as the finest work of Brazil’s illustrious writer, Machado de Assis. Earlier this year we introduced the English reader to EPITAPH OF A SMALL WINNER, a novel which revealed Machado’s piquant sense of burlesque and his superb gift as a story-teller. Not only does he paint the passing show with wit and wry humour, but he delves into the human mind with insight and precision. DOM CASMURRO is a novel written in the form of the intimate memoirs of an old lawyer, known as ‘Grumpy’, a nickname which gives the book its title. He was not always the disillusioned cynic he now appears. Once he was an eager child thrilled at the joy of riding in a chaise, or engrossed in games of make-believe with the little girl next door; once he was an enthusiastic undergraduate; once a lover newly wed, proud of his wife’s beauty and jealous of her charms. That was before he even suspected the secret that was to rob him of all happiness. The story is a moving and penetrating portrait of a man’s innermost thoughts, written by a shrewd student of human nature. With a Chaucerian delight in story-telling, Machado creates characters that linger long after the tale is told. His prose style has a rare quality. The curious world of nineteenth-century Brazil about which Machado writes is remote and fascinatingly strange, but the vitality and charm of his original writing has been preserved in this excellent translation.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Dom Casmurro. New York. 1997. Oxford University Press. 0195103084. Foreword by John Gledson. Afterword by Joao Adolfo Hansen. Translated from the Portuguese by John Gledson. Library of Latin America series. 258 pages. hardcover. Cover art - Jose Ferraz de Almeida Junior-'Violeiro (Guitar Player)'

‘A Palmtree, seeing me troubled and divining the cause, murmured in its branches that there was nothing wrong with fifteen-year-old boys getting into corners with girls of fourteen; quite the contrary, youths of that age have no other function, and corners were made for that very purpose. It was an old palm tree, and I believed in old palm trees even more than in old books. Birds, butterflies, a cricket trying out its summer song, all the living things of the air were of the same opinion.’ So begins this extraordinary love story between Bento and Capitu, childhood sweethearts who grow up next door to each other in Rio de Janeiro in the 1850s. Like other great nineteenth-century novels - THE SCARLET LETTER, ANNA KARENINA, MADAME BOVARY - Machado de Assis’s DOM CASMURRO explores the themes of marriage and adultery. But what distinguishes Machado’s novel from the realism of its contemporaries, and what makes it such a delightful discovery for English-speaking readers, is its eccentric and wildly unpredictable narrative style. Far from creating the illusion of an orderly fictional ‘reality,’ DOM CASMURRO is told by a narrator who is disruptively self-conscious, deeply subjective, and prone to all manner of marvelous digression. As he recounts the events of his life from the vantage of a lonely old age, Bento continually interrupts his story to reflect on the writing of it: he examines the aptness of an image or analogy, considers cutting out certain scenes before taking the manuscript to the printer, and engages in a running, and often hilarious, dialogue with the reader. If all this seems a little emphatic, irritating reader,’ he says, ‘it’s because you have never combed a girl’s hair, you’ve never put your adolescent hands on the young head of a nymph . . . ‘ But the novel is more than a performance of stylistic acrobatics. It is an ironic critique of Catholicism, in which God appears as a kind of divine accountant whose ledgers may be balanced in devious as well as pious ways. It is also a story about love and its obstacles, about deception and self-deception, and about the failure of memory to make life’s beginning fit neatly into its end. First published in 1900, DOM CASMURRO is one of the great unrecognized classics of the turn of the century by one of Brazil’s greatest writers. The popularity of Machado de Assis in Latin America has never been in doubt and now, with the acclaim of such critics and writers as Susan Sontag, John Barth, and Tony Tanner, his work is finally receiving the worldwide attention it deserves. Newly translated and edited by John Gledson, with an afterword by João Adolfo Hansen, this Library of Latin America edition is the only complete, unabridged, and annotated translation available of one of the most distinctive novels of the last century.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. John Gledson is Professor Emeritus, Department of Hispanic Studies at the University of Liverpool. He has written two books and numerous articles on Machado de Assis. Joao Adolfo Hansen is a highly regarded Brazilian literary critic.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Dom Casmurro. New York. 1980. Avon/Bard. 0380496682. Translated from the Portuguese & With An Introduction by Helen Caldwell. 255 pages. paperback.

LORD CURMUDGEON - So nicknamed by his friends for his morose bearing and aristocratic airs, an old man reflects on the life he lived in the affluent suburbs of Rio—of the happiness he won in the marriage of his childhood sweetheart and how he lost it all to his own suspicions. ‘No satirist, not even Swift, is less merciful in his exposure of the pretentiousness and the hypocrisy that lurk in the average good man and woman. Machado, in his deceptively amiable way, is terrifying. I do not see how a man who has thoughtfully read Dam Casmurro can ever be quite the same as he was before.’ - Dudley Fitts in the NEW REPUBLIC.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Epitaph of a Small Winner. New York. 1952. Noonday Press. Drawings by Shari Frisch. Translated from the Portuguese by William L. Grossman. 223 pages. hardcover. Cover: Shari Frisch

Satirical, witty, completely human in feeling, EPITAPH OF A SMALL WINNER is that rarest of works, a book which is at the same time both profound and thoroughly delightful. It tells the story of Braz Cubas, a wealthy Carioca, or rather it is Braz, now dead, who tells his story. For EPITAPH OF A SMALL WINNER is a posthumous memoir, the memories of a ghost, a man who now beyond life can view it with dispassion - the illicit love affairs, the political ambitions, the jealousies and hatreds which comprised his sixty-four years. But though the grave has given Braz distance, it has not dampened his sense of humor. On the contrary, it has sharpened it; Braz Cubas is certainly the wittiest ghost in literature. Most ghosts take themselves far too seriously; but not Braz. If he has returned to haunt mankind, it is by means of laughter. He is the spirit of satire moving among us, pointing out our idiosyncrasies and foibles. ‘Machado de Assis, son of a poor mulatto of Rio, became the most illustrious of Brazilian writers. His work brings to mind at once Anatole France and Lawrence Sterne, yet is nonetheless original.’ - André Maurois. ‘A master of psychology and of an ironic brand of humour.’ - Samuel Putnam.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. The translator, Dr. William L. Grossman, is of all things an authority on transportation law and economics. Called to Brazil in 1948 as head of the economics department of a Brazilian college, he learned Portuguese, and, fascinated by the works of Machado de Assis, spent his academic holidays translating Epitaph of a Small Winner. Dr. Grossman has returned to this country as a transportation consultant and professor at New York University.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Epitaph of a Small Winner. New York. 1978. Avon/Bard. 0380017121. Translated from the Portuguese by William L. Grossman. 251 pages. paperback.

FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE, a witty and cynical ghost recalls his life—his illicit love affairs, his political ambitions, his personal jealousies—and decides that, though dead, he is still ahead of the game. ‘Machado de Assis was not only the most eminent, and the most honored man of letters in Brazil; he was a literary force, transcending nationality and language, comparable certainly to Flaubert, to Hardy, or to James . . . . EPITAPH OF A SMALL WINNER is clearly one of those books we can call definitive . . . a major contribution to American literature.’ - The New York Times . . . ‘A classic comedy of ideas as fascinating as it is delightful.’ - The New Yorker . . . ‘The novel well deserves its place in world literature . . . a superb English version. - The Commonweal.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. The translator, Dr. William L. Grossman, is of all things an authority on transportation law and economics. Called to Brazil in 1948 as head of the economics department of a Brazilian college, he learned Portuguese, and, fascinated by the works of Machado de Assis, spent his academic holidays translating Epitaph of a Small Winner. Dr. Grossman has returned to this country as a transportation consultant and professor at New York University.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Esau and Jacob. Berkeley. 1965. University Of California Press. Translated from the Portuguese & With An Introduction by Helen Caldwell. 287 pages. hardcover. Design by Ann W. Hawkins

This novel, the next to last Machado de Assis wrote before his death in 1908, is set in the Rio de Janeiro of 1869-1894 during the tumultuous period of the emancipation of the slaves, the revolt against the Emperor Dom Pedro II, the formation of the Republic, and the counterrevolution - events Machado witnessed and reported on in the local press. Using the skeptical and career-hardened old diplomat Ayres as his narrator and hero, Machado gives us an absorbing political novel that is also a timeless and deeply conceived allegory. The work is full of Machado’s satirical view of human nature and Brazilian society. Although his characters have a double symbolical significance, they also have a permanent life of their own as the a reader will discover when he encounters the warring, identical twins, Paulo the liberal and Pedro the conservative, fighting over the lovely and baffling Flora; Santos, the twins’ father, a hardheaded and unscrupulous banker who, as a Spiritualist, was willing to believe he was the father of reincarnated Aposties; Baptista, Flora’s father, a politician who heard the voices of certain carioca witches tempting him to change his political party; his Lady Macbeth-like wife who rejoiced to hear her husband called a bloodthirsty tyrant even though she knew he had a pigeon’s heart; the wealthy nabob who started his fortune by stealing two milreis from the collection plate; and, both above and through it all, Ayres, pursuing his strange, purposeful narration.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Helen Caldwell, Lecturer in Classics at the University of California, Los Angeles, is the author of The Brazilian Othello of MACHADO DE ASSIS: A STUDY OF DOM CASMURRO (University of California Press, 1960), the translator of Machado’s DOM CASMURRO (1953), and co-translator, with William L. Grossman, of The PSYCHIATRIST AND OTHER STORIES (University of California Press, 1963). She has been honored by the American Association of University Women, decorated in 1959 by the Brazilian government with the Order of the Southern Cross, and awarded the Machado de Assis Medal in 1963 by the Brazilian Academy of Letters.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Helena. Berkeley. 1984. University Of California Press. 0520048121. Translated from the Portuguese by Helen Caldwell. 197 pages. hardcover. Jacket Design: Linda M. Robertson

HELENA is a novel that has enthralled Brazilians for generations and was especially dear to its author. Originally published in 1876, it was Machado de Assis’s third novel and is being translated into English for the first time. Set in Rio de Janeiro in 1850, it is a suspenseful story of mystery and romance. Helena is the presumed illegitimate daughter of an upper-class Brazilian, and after his death she is brought to live in the family home. She is a proud, beautiful, and vivacious woman - but her past is cloaked in mystery. Her half-brother, Estacio, tries to solve the mystery of Helena but falls more and more in love with her. The underlying implication of an incestuous relationship creates a profound tension throughout the novel, and this tension rises and culminates in a highly dramatic and unexpected conclusion. The wit and satire that distinguishes all of Machado de Assis’s work is piercingly directed at many of the other characters who inhabit the novel. Most of them are members of Brazilian high society, and their avariciousness, pettiness, hypocrisy, and outright villainy contrast with the selflessness of Helena. The effect is often one of comic relief as well as a penetrating insight into Brazilian society in the nineteenth century.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Helen Caldwell has written an illuminating introduction to Helena. She once again demonstrates her consummate skills as the major critic-translator of Machado de Assis’s work. This will be her fifth translation of his works for the University of California Press and she-has also authored two books of literary criticism. Her remarkable abilities have done much to give Machado de Assis the recognition he deserves as a writer of world stature. For her contributions she has been decorated by the Brazilian government with the Order of the Southern Cross.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Iaia Garcia. Lexington. 1977. University Press Of Kentucky. 0813113539. Translated from the Portuguese by Albert I. Bagby Jr. 166 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Angela Freeman

The last of four novels that precede Assis’s famous trilogy of realistic masterpieces, IAIA GARCIA belongs to what critics have called the Brazilian author’s ‘romantic’ phase. But it is far more than that implies. Like his other early works, laid Garcia foreshadows the themes and characters of Assis’s most masterful novels. IAIA GARCIA intertwines the lives of three characters in a subtly and wryly developing relationship. While the youthful Iaiá is growing into womanhood, a tentative love affair occurs between the aristocratic Jorge and the prideful Estela. This affair is afflicted by ironic shifts of fortune and in time the maturing Iaia becomes a rival for Jorge’s attentions. Assis’s portrayal of the relationship among these three characters is a perceptive study of uncompromising pride, thwarted love, jealousy, misunderstanding, bewilderment, and attainment. As the translator, Albert I. Bagby, Jr., contends, the story of Iaiá, Jorge, and Estela refleets the formula that Assis saw as fundamental to human life: ‘Will and ambition, when they truly dominate, can struggle with other feelings, but they are the weapons of the strong, and victory belongs to the strong.’ In Assis’s view success comes to the strong and failure to the weak. But both inhabit a world that is neutral - neither helping one nor hindering the other. The outcome of events in laid Garcia may not seem entirely optimistic, but neither is it pessimistic. And Mr. Bagby concludes, ‘Perhaps to understand the optimism of Assis one needs only to be . . . a hard, pragmatic realist . . . Whether hard realists or unregenerate romantics, readers of this novel will find it a compelling tale of love lost and won. Like his earlier translation of Assis’s THE HAND & THE GLOVE, Mr. Bagby’s English rendering of laia Garcia from the original Portuguese is done with both accuracy and sensitivity.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Albert I. Bagby, Jr., was born in Porto Alegre, Brazil to an American mother and a Brazilian father. At the age of eighteen he came to the United States, where he studied at Baylor, Missouri, North Carolina, and Vanderbilt universities. He received a Ph.D. in Spanish literature from the University of Kentucky in 1968. Presently he is an associate professor of Portuguese and Spanish at the University of Texas at El Paso.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Philosopher Or Dog?. New York. 1982. Avon/Bard. 0380589826. Translated from the Portuguese by Clotilde Wilson. 271 pages. paperback.

PHILOSOPHER OR DOG? WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE? Quincas Borba, rich eccentric philosopher and leading man in EPITAPH OF A SMALL WINNER, has named his dog Quincas Borba, because - as he explains to his friend Rubiao - Quincas the man is going to die first. And though he will be immortalized in history for his famous philosophy, he will also be remembered by the illiterates through his dog. Quincas the man does die first, leaving his fortune to Rubiao, provided that he take care of the dog. Rubiao, heretofore a not-too-bright teacher, suddenly becomes a wealthy man, with stocks and homes and investments and servants. But Rubiao is hardly the worldly cosmopolitan type. And when he forsakes his hometown of Barbacena for Quincas’ mansion in Rio, he’s in for a whole new world of experiences . . . including insanity. ‘Machado de Assis is still caviar - delicious caviar’. - Saturday Review.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Clotilde Wilson, the translator of PHILOSOPHER OR DOG?, teaches romance languages at The University of Wisconsin.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Philosopher Or Dog?. New York. 1954. Noonday Press. Translated from the Portuguese by Clotilde Wilson. 271 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by: George W. Thompson.

PHILOSOPHER OR DOG? is in a loose sense a sequel to EPITAPH OF A SMALL WINNER. It tells the story of Rubiao, a provincial schoolteacher who almost by accident inherits a large fortune. Rubiao’s benefactor is Quincas Borba, the mad philosopher of Epitaph, who on dying names Rubiao his sole heir upon condition that the latter take care of Quincas’ dog. Oddly enough the name of the dog is also Quincas Borba, and hence the doubt as to whether the philosopher or the dog gives his name to the book. The problem of the simple, Rubiao, suddenly become a man of wealth, is perfect material for Machado, the supreme ironist. He exhibits Rubiao as lover, patron, politician - a pathetic, egotistical clown bent on creating his own comic downfall. This is Machodo at his wittiest, and those who have read Epitaph already know how witty Machado can be. To quote the New York Times Book Review, ‘His is a highly personal brew of compassion, pessimism and devastating psychological insight.’ Already Machado has a large American following; the publication of this book, the only one of his three masterpieces still unavailable in English, should do much to solidify and increase his reputation.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Clotilde Wilson, the translator of PHILOSOPHER OR DOG?, teaches romance languages at The University of Wisconsin.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Quincas Borba. New York. 1998. Oxford University Press. 0195106814. Introduction by David T. Haberly. Afterword by Celso Favaretto. Translated from the Portuguese by Gregory Rabassa. Library of Latin America series. 290 pages. hardcover. Cover: Kathleen M. Lynch

Along with THE POSTHUMOUS MEMOIRS OF BRAS CUBAS and DOM CASMURRO, QUINCAS BORBA is one of Machado de Assis’ major works and indeed one of the major works of nineteenth-century fiction. With his uncannily postmodern sensibility, his delicious wit, and his keen insight into the political and social complexities of the Brazilian Empire, Machado opens a fascinating world to English-speaking readers. When the mad philosopher Quincas Borba dies, he leaves to his friend Rubião the entirety of his wealth and property, with a single stipulation: Rubião must take care of Quincas Borba’s dog, who is also named Quincas Borba, and who may indeed have assumed the soul of the dead philosopher. Flush with his newfound wealth, Rubião heads for Rio de Janeiro and plunges headlong into a world where fantasy and reality become increasingly difficult to keep separate. We encounter roses that speak to each other, discussing the character and actions of their owner, Sofia; even the stars above occasionally comment, sarcastically, on the humans below. When Rubião falls in love with the wife of his best friend, we see adultery as yet another betrayal of reality. Rubião’s own hold on reality becomes ever more tenuous as he makes elaborate plans for his marriage, even though he has no bride, and fantasizes that he has become Napoleon III. The very nature of reality, the novel seems to be saying, is an agreed-upon fiction told by an unreliable narrator. Brilliantly translated by Gregory Rabassa, QUINCAS BORBA is a masterful satire not only on life in Imperial Brazil but the human condition itself.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Resurrection. Pittsburgh. 1978. Latin American Literary Review Press. 9781891270147. Translated from the Portuguese by Karen Sherwood Sotelino. 162 pages. paperback. Cover art: ‘Arrufos’ by Belmiro de Almeida.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis (1839-1908), widely considered one of the most innovative Latin American authors, is best known for his two masterpiece novels, Memórias Póstumas de Bras Cubas and Dom Casmurro. This self-taught intellectual, born into a modest family in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, wrote nine novels, over two hundred short stories, plays and poetry. He was also the founding president of the Brazilian Academy of Letters (1896), a position he held throughout the rest of his life. Referred to as a ‘miracle’ by both Harold Bloom and Carlos Fuentes, Machado de Assis’s literature is at once profoundly thought-provoking and entertaining. RESURRECTION (1872), Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis’s first novel in its debut English translation, visits themes the author developed exquisitely throughout his career including marriage, memory, and perspective. In this insightful translation by Karen Sherwood Sotelino, and with an elucidating introduction by José Luiz Passos, RESURRECTION reveals the author’s early experiment in drawing out psychological and sociological issues of his time. Readers familiar with his mature works will recognize the progression from infatuation, through passion, doubt, and toxic jealousy, as experienced by protagonists Felix and Livia in 19th century Rio de Janeiro. ‘Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis(1839-1908) is universally recognized as Brazil’s greatest writer. RESURRECTION was his first novel, and this is its first publication in English - a most welcome event. This is no tentative beginning, but an original, carefully observed study of a jealous man, set amongst the Rio de Janeiro middle class. In particular, it looks forward to Machado’s greatest and most popular novel, DOM CASMURRO, in which he returns (obsessively?) to the same favorite type.’ - John Gledson. ‘Long relegated to the shelf of ‘immature works’, Ressurreição/Resurrection resurfaces, in this fine English version, as what it has always been: a sophisticated comment on the green-eyed monster’s roamings in a tropical Europeanized society, whose denizens, like Ingmar Bergman’s characters, will reappear in later novels, under different names, always intently turned upon their own feelings, fears, and foibles.’ - Milton M. Azevedo. ‘In many aspects, Machado de Assis’s debut novel foretells the genius found in his later works. Within the restricted limits of the reigning decorum, the daring of the moral analysis is substantial and highly unconventional. It is a novel for sophisticated readers.’ - Roberto Schwarz.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. Stories. Champaign. 2014. Dalkey Archive. 9781564788993. Translated from the Portuguese, edited, and with an introduction by Rhett McNeil. 201 pages. paperback. Cover design by Mikhail Iliatov

Featuring ten stories never before translated, dating from 1878 to 1886 (regarded as Joaquim Machado de Assis s most radically experimental period), this selection of short fiction by Brazil s greatest author ranges in tone from elegiac and philosophical to impishly ironic. Including the author s classic essay on world literature also appearing in English for the first time and with pieces chosen from his vast body of work for their playfulness, pathos, and stylistic subversion, this collection is an ideal introduction to one of world literature s greatest talents.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Born in Pôrto Alegre, Brazil, of American mother and Brazilian father, Albert I. Bagby, Jr., grew up speaking both Portuguese and English. After eighteen years in Brazil, he came to the United States and entered Baylor University. Following graduation from Baylor, he continued his studies at the universities of Missouri, where he received his M.A., at North Carolina, and at Vanderbilt University; in 1968 he received a doctoral degree in Spanish literature from the University of Kentucky. Presently Mr. Bagby is chairman of the Romance Languages Department at the University of Corpus Christi, Texas. Among his writing plans are translations of Assis’ three other early novels.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. The Alienist and Other Stories of Nineteenth-Century Brazil. Indianapolis/Cambridge. 2013. Hackett Publishing Company. 9781603848527. Translated from the Portuguese, edited, and with an introduction by John Charles Chasteen. 125 pages. paperback.

Accompanied by a thorough introduction to Brazil's Machado, Machado's Brazil, these vibrant new translations of eight of Machado de Assis's best-known short stories bring nineteenth-century Brazilian society and culture to life for modern readers.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Born in Pôrto Alegre, Brazil, of American mother and Brazilian father, Albert I. Bagby, Jr., grew up speaking both Portuguese and English. After eighteen years in Brazil, he came to the United States and entered Baylor University. Following graduation from Baylor, he continued his studies at the universities of Missouri, where he received his M.A., at North Carolina, and at Vanderbilt University; in 1968 he received a doctoral degree in Spanish literature from the University of Kentucky. Presently Mr. Bagby is chairman of the Romance Languages Department at the University of Corpus Christi, Texas. Among his writing plans are translations of Assis’ three other early novels.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. The Collected Stories of Machado De Assis. New York. 2018. Liveright. 9780871404961. Translated from the Portuguese by Margaret Jull Costa and Robin Patterson. 931 pages. hardcover.

A landmark event, the complete stories of Machado de Assis appear in English for the first time in this extraordinary new translation. A progenitor of twentieth-century Latin American fiction, Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis (1839-1908), was hailed in his lifetime as Brazil’s greatest writer. This majestic translation combines all his short-story collections appearing in his lifetime and reintroduces de Assis as a literary giant who must be integrated into the world literary canon. To Machado, your identity and the contours of your world are formed not just by your circumstances but by what you think about habitually. You are what you contemplate, so choose wisely. These stories are a spectacular place to start. — The New York Times.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Gregory Rabassa is the acclaimed translator of One Hundred Years of Solitude and many other works of Latin American fiction. Enylton de Sá Rego is a Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Texas at Austin. Gilberto Pinheiro Passos is a Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of São Paulo.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. The Devil's Church and Other Stories. Austin. 1977. University Of Texas Press. 0292775350. Translated from the Portuguese by Jack Schmitt & Lorie Ishimatsu. Texas Pan American Series. 152 pages. hardcover. Cover Illustration by Ed Lindlof.

The modern Brazilian short story begins with the mature work of Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis (1839-1908), acclaimed almost unanimously as Brazil’s greatest writer. Collectively, these nineteen stories are representative of Machado’s unique style and world view, and this translation doubles the number of his stories previously available in English. The stories in this volume reflect Machado’s post-1880 emphasis on social satire and experimentation in psychological realism. If he had continued to produce the moralistic love stories and parlor intrigues of his earlier fiction, Machado’s legacy would have been an entertaining but inconsequent body of work. However, by 1880 he had begun a devastating satirical assault on society through his fiction. In spite of his ruthlessness, Machado does at times reveal an ironic sympathy for his characters. He is not indifferent to human conflict but uses humor and irony to stress the absurdity of these conflicts, acted out against the backdrop of an indifferent universe. Such a spectacle creates a sense of helplessness that can only inspire wistful amusement. In his technical mastery of the short story, Machado was decades ahead of his contemporaries and can still be considered more modern than most of the modernists themselves. That his stories elicit such strong and diverse reactions today is a tribute to their richness, complexity, and significance.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. The Hand & the Glove. Lexington. 1970. University Press Of Kentucky. 0813112117. Translated from the Portuguese by Albert I. Bagby Jr. 117 pages. hardcover. Cover design by Jonathan Greene

The later novels of Machado de Assis - notably DOM CASMURRO and ESAU AND JACOB - are well known in this country, but the earlier novels have never been translated. Here, in THE HAND AND THE GLOVE (the Brazilian master’s second novel), rendered in English for the first time by Albeit I. Baghy, Jr., readers will find a younger, gentler Assis, writing a romantic comedy that is yet permeated with the lively wit characteristic of his later works. The story is a simple one - of love lost and love found. Of love lost by Estêvão, amiable but vacillating, who is bemused by his own romantic posturing, and by Jorge, superficial and calculating. Of love found by Luis Alves, whose self-possession and determination seem destined to carry him far. The love of all three men is the proud and beautiful Guiomar, sure of her own heart but unsure, until faced by rival claims, of where to bestow it - a foreshadowing of Capitu, the intriguing heroine of DOM CASMURRO. ‘English-speaking readers,’ says Helen Caldwell in the Foreword, ‘who are already acquainted with Machado de Assis will welcome this latest addition to the translated novels. True, it is a period piece; but its quaintness is a charm to carry us back to the Rio de Janeiro of the 1850s - to vanished courtly elegance and attitudes. . . . Now, we too can know what drew Assis back to this early tale, for THE HAND AND THE GLOVE recreates in English the elegant background, the charming heroine, the comedy, and the light-hearted ebullience of the Portuguese original. . Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Born in Pôrto Alegre, Brazil, of American mother and Brazilian father, Albert I. Bagby, Jr., grew up speaking both Portuguese and English. After eighteen years in Brazil, he came to the United States and entered Baylor University. Following graduation from Baylor, he continued his studies at the universities of Missouri, where he received his M.A., at North Carolina, and at Vanderbilt University; in 1968 he received a doctoral degree in Spanish literature from the University of Kentucky. Presently Mr. Bagby is chairman of the Romance Languages Department at the University of Corpus Christi, Texas. Among his writing plans are translations of Assis’ three other early novels. . original title: A Mao e a Luva.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Jack Schmitt is assistant professor of Spanish and Portuguese at California State University, Long Beach. Lone lshimatsu is a graduate student and associate instructor in Spanish and Portuguese at Indiana University.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas. New York. 1997. Oxford University Press. 0195101693. Foreword by Enylton De Sa Rego. Afterword by Gilberto Pinheiro Passos. Translated from the Portuguese by Gregory Rabassa. Library of Latin America series. 219 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Kathleen M. Lynch. Jacket painting: 'Young Man with a pen (el joven de la estilografica), Diego Rivera.

‘Be aware that frankness is the prime virtue of a dead man,’ writes the extraordinary narrator of THE POSTHUMOUS MEMOIRS OF BRAS CUBAS. ‘The gaze of public opinion, that sharp and judgmental gaze, loses its virtue the moment we tread the territory of death. I’m not saying that it doesn’t reach here and examine and judge us, but we don’t care about the examination or the judgment. My dear living gentlemen and ladies, there’s nothing as incommensurable as the disdain of the deceased.’ Indeed, writing his memoirs from the other world gives Bras Cubas a certain freedom from both social and literary conventions. And while he may be dead, he is surely one of the liveliest characters in fiction, a product of one of the most remarkable imaginations in all of literature, Brazil’s greatest novelist of the nineteenth century, Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis. In this wildly inventive book, Machado is, in fact, much closer to such postmodern masters as Calvino, Kundera, and Garcia Marquez than to the conventions of the nineteenth century realist and romantic novel, which the narrator continually and hilariously mocks. Irrepressibly whimsical, irreverent, chatty, and charmingly self-absorbed, Bras Cubas is forever intruding into his narrative, questioning, lecturing, and elbowing the reader, commenting on his writing and its highly unusual style - his book and my style are like drunkards, they stagger left and right, they walk and stop, mumble, yell, cackle, shake their fists at the sky, stumble, and fall’ - congratulating himself on particular chapters, wondering whether to cut others out, and interrupting his life story with all manner of digressions, from a philosophical discourse on the purpose of the nose to a visionary ride on the back of a hippopotamus to find the origin of the centuries. Along the way we’re treated to a marvelous cast of characters, including the outlandish philosopher Quincas Borba, who asserts that ‘asceticism is the perfection of human idiocy,’ and Virgilia, the beautiful married woman with whom Bras Cubas carries on a passionate and not-so-secret love affair. By turns flippant and profound, THE POSTHUMOUS MEMOIRS OF BRAS CUBAS is the story of an unheroic man with half-hearted political ambitions, a harebrained idea for curing the world of melancholy, and a thousand quixotic theories unleashed from beyond the grave. It is a novel that has influenced generations of Latin American writers but remains refreshingly and unforgettably unlike anything written before or after it. Newly translated by Gregory Rabassa and superbly edited by Enylton de Sá Rego and Gilberto Pinheiro Passos, who provide an insightful introduction and afterword, this edition inaugurates Oxford’s Library of Latin America series, and brings to English-speaking readers a literary delight of the highest order.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Gregory Rabassa is the acclaimed translator of One Hundred Years of Solitude and many other works of Latin American fiction. Enylton de Sá Rego is a Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Texas at Austin. Gilberto Pinheiro Passos is a Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of São Paulo.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. The Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas. New York. 1998. Oxford University Press. 0195101707. Foreword by Enylton De Sa Rego. Afterword by Gilberto Pinheiro Passos. Translated from the Portuguese by Gregory Rabassa. Library of Latin America series. 219 pages. paperback. Jacket design by Kathleen M. Lynch. Jacket painting: 'Young Man with a pen (el joven de la estilografica), Diego Rivera.

‘Be aware that frankness is the prime virtue of a dead man,’ writes the extraordinary narrator of THE POSTHUMOUS MEMOIRS OF BRAS CUBAS. ‘The gaze of public opinion, that sharp and judgmental gaze, loses its virtue the moment we tread the territory of death. I’m not saying that it doesn’t reach here and examine and judge us, but we don’t care about the examination or the judgment. My dear living gentlemen and ladies, there’s nothing as incommensurable as the disdain of the deceased.’ Indeed, writing his memoirs from the other world gives Bras Cubas a certain freedom from both social and literary conventions. And while he may be dead, he is surely one of the liveliest characters in fiction, a product of one of the most remarkable imaginations in all of literature, Brazil’s greatest novelist of the nineteenth century, Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis. In this wildly inventive book, Machado is, in fact, much closer to such postmodern masters as Calvino, Kundera, and Garcia Marquez than to the conventions of the nineteenth century realist and romantic novel, which the narrator continually and hilariously mocks. Irrepressibly whimsical, irreverent, chatty, and charmingly self-absorbed, Bras Cubas is forever intruding into his narrative, questioning, lecturing, and elbowing the reader, commenting on his writing and its highly unusual style - his book and my style are like drunkards, they stagger left and right, they walk and stop, mumble, yell, cackle, shake their fists at the sky, stumble, and fall’ - congratulating himself on particular chapters, wondering whether to cut others out, and interrupting his life story with all manner of digressions, from a philosophical discourse on the purpose of the nose to a visionary ride on the back of a hippopotamus to find the origin of the centuries. Along the way we’re treated to a marvelous cast of characters, including the outlandish philosopher Quincas Borba, who asserts that ‘asceticism is the perfection of human idiocy,’ and Virgilia, the beautiful married woman with whom Bras Cubas carries on a passionate and not-so-secret love affair. By turns flippant and profound, THE POSTHUMOUS MEMOIRS OF BRAS CUBAS is the story of an unheroic man with half-hearted political ambitions, a harebrained idea for curing the world of melancholy, and a thousand quixotic theories unleashed from beyond the grave. It is a novel that has influenced generations of Latin American writers but remains refreshingly and unforgettably unlike anything written before or after it. Newly translated by Gregory Rabassa and superbly edited by Enylton de Sá Rego and Gilberto Pinheiro Passos, who provide an insightful introduction and afterword, this edition inaugurates Oxford’s Library of Latin America series, and brings to English-speaking readers a literary delight of the highest order.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. Gregory Rabassa is the acclaimed translator of One Hundred Years of Solitude and many other works of Latin American fiction. Enylton de Sá Rego is a Professor in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of Texas at Austin. Gilberto Pinheiro Passos is a Professor of Comparative Literature at the University of São Paulo.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. The Psychiatrist and Other Stories. Berkeley. 1963. University Of California Press. Translated from the Portuguese by William L. Grossman & Helen Caldwell. 147 pages. hardcover. Cover: Theo Jung

The first collection of the short stories of Machado de Assis to appear in English. These twelve stories by Brazil’s greatest writer are penetrating psychological vignettes, and witty ironic satires on science, politics, the gambling instinct, the professorial mind, as well as that of the lady of easy virtue, sadism, envy, and other human foibles and vanities. Here is Machado de Assis’ humor in both its mild and mordant form; all the stories, no matter how grim the message, contain powerful comic elements and are cast in the mold of comedy. The locale of all the stories is Rio de Janeiro or its outskirts. ‘Machado de Assis was a literary force transcending nationality and language, comparable certainly to Flaubert, Hardy, or James.’ - Dudley Fitts. ‘One of the great writers of all time . . . a novelist with whom we have none to compare.’ ‘He comes bringing the gift of temperament, a highly personalized view of life and the world which still is broad as the world, as deep and dark and mystery-laden as life itself,’ - Samuel Putnam. ‘As a novelist and writer of short stories, he admits of no peers either in Spanish or in his own language.’ - Arturo Torres-Rioseco.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. THE TRANSLATORS: WILLIAM L. GROSSMAN, of New York University, translator of EPITAPH OF A SMALL WINNER, which introduced Machado de Assis to readers of English, and other masterpieces of Brazilian literature. Awarded the Machado de Assis Medal of the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1961, the first American to receive the honor. HELEN CALDWELL, of the University of California, Los Angeles, translator of DOM CASMURRO and author of a scholarly study entitled THE BRAZILIAN OTHELLO OF MACHADO DE ASSIS. Decorated in 1959 by the Brazilian government with the Order of the Southern Cross.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado De. The Wager: Aires' Journal. London. 1990. Peter Owen. 0720607728. Translated from the Portuguese by R. L. Scott-Buccleuch. 165 pages. hardcover. Cover: Keith Cunningham

Machado de Assis (1839-1908) is Brazil’s finest novelist. In the year of his death he published THE WAGER, a poignant elegy for a lost world, and a work which shows him still at the height of his powers. Returning to his native Rio after many years abroad, Aires, a retired diplomat, is captivated by a young widow, Fidelia Noronha, whom he sees praying at her husband’s graveside. Her charm and the tragic story of her brief marriage increase his fascination, and soon he is indulging in impossible dreams. But the Brazil that Aires remembers from his youth is fast changing. A new era is dawning with event such as the coming of the railway and the abolition of slavery. The future belongs to a younger generation, to men like Tristao, the doctor and political candidate, who is also an admirer of the beautiful Fidelia . . . . Imbued with autumnal sadness, THE WAGER is the story of a man coming to terms with old age and approaching death. With its shrewd observation of human nature and gentle, ironic humor, the work of Machado de Assis remains timeless in its appeal.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died. ROBERT SCOTT-BUCCLEUCH studied at St. Andrews University. In 1963 he was appointed Associate Professor of English at the University of Brasilia. He holds the Machado de Assis Medal for his translations of works by Brazilian writers.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado de. What Went Wrong at the Baroness': A Tale With a Point. Santa Monica, California. 1963. Magpie Press. unpaginated.



Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died.
Assis, Joaquim Maria Machado de. Yaya Garcia. London. 1976. Peter Owen. Translated by R. L. Scott-Buccleuch. 220 pages.

Part of the UNESCO Collection of Representative Works of Latin America. The last of four novels that precede Assis’s famous trilogy of realistic masterpieces, IAIA GARCIA belongs to what critics have called the Brazilian author’s ‘romantic’ phase. But it is far more than that implies. Like his other early works, laid Garcia foreshadows the themes and characters of Assis’s most masterful novels. IAIA GARCIA intertwines the lives of three characters in a subtly and wryly developing relationship. While the youthful Iaiá is growing into womanhood, a tentative love affair occurs between the aristocratic Jorge and the prideful Estela. This affair is afflicted by ironic shifts of fortune and in time the maturing Iaia becomes a rival for Jorge’s attentions. Assis’s portrayal of the relationship among these three characters is a perceptive study of uncompromising pride, thwarted love, jealousy, misunderstanding, bewilderment, and attainment.

Joaquim Maria Machado de Assis, often known as Machado de Assis, Machado, or Bruxo do Cosme Velho, (June 21, 1839, Rio de Janeiro-September 29, 1908, Rio de Janeiro) was a Brazilian novelist, poet and short-story writer. He is widely regarded as the most important writer of Brazilian literature. However, he did not gain widespread popularity outside Brazil in his own lifetime. Machado’s works had a great influence on Brazilian literary schools of the late 19th century and 20th century. José Saramago, Carlos Fuentes, Susan Sontag and Harold Bloom are among his admirers and Bloom calls him ‘the supreme black literary artist to date.’ Son of Francisco José de Assis (a mulatto housepainter, descendent of freed slaves) and Maria Leopoldina Machado de Assis (a Portuguese washerwoman), Machado de Assis lost both his mother and his only sister at an early age. Machado is said to have learned to write by himself, and he used to take classes for free will. He learned to speak French first and English later, both fluently. He started to work for newspapers in Rio de Janeiro, where he published his first works and met established writers such as Joaquim Manuel de Macedo. Machado de Assis married Carolina Xavier de Novais, a Portuguese descendant of a noble family. Soon the writer got a public job and this stability permitted him to write his best works. Machado de Assis began by writing popular novels which sold well, much in the late style of José de Alencar. His style changed in the 1880s, and it is for the sceptical, ironic, comedic but ultimately pessimistic works he wrote after this that he is remembered: the first novel in his ‘new style’ was Epitaph for a Small Winner, known in the new Gregory Rabassa translation as The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas (a literal translation of the original title, Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas). In their brilliant comedy and ironic playfulness, these resemble in some ways the contemporary works of George Meredith in the United Kingdom, and Eça de Queirós in Portugal, but Machado de Assis’ work has a far bleaker emotional undertone. Machado’s work has also been compared with Laurence Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Machado de Assis could speak English fluently and translated many works of William Shakespeare and other English writers into Portuguese. His work contains numerous allusions to Shakespearean plays, John Milton and influences from Sterne and Meredith. He is also known as a master of the short story, having written classics of the genre in the Portuguese language, such as O Alienista, Missa do Galo, ‘A Cartomante’ and ‘A Igreja do Diabo.’ Along with other writers and intellectuals, Machado de Assis founded the Brazilian Academy of Letters in 1896 and was its president from 1897 to 1908, when he died.
Asturias, Miguel Angel. El Senor Presidente. New York. 1982. Atheneum. 0689705212. 288 pages. paperback. 211. Cover design by Everett Aison

Asturias has long been celebrated in Europe and Latin America as a writer of the highest stature. He writes in an extraordinary language of the most staggering vitality, full of symbolism and exotic metaphor, yet uncompromisingly realistic, as powerful and electrifying as a nightmare. EL SEÑOR PRESIDENTE is the story of a corrupt and dissolute Caribbean dictator, his henchmen and his victims. The killing of one of his sycophant generals provokes a political intrigue that can- not fail to touch everyone with blood: a halfwit beggar, shot after dragging his body, broken-limbed, through the wilderness for days; his derelict companions, tortured into false confessions; a government official’s wife, who watches her nursing infant die just beyond her reach, and is sold into prostitution; a timid court clerk, flogged to death for spilling ink on the President’s desk; even Angel Face, the President’s favorite, ‘As handsome and as evil as Satan.’ The scene is kaleidoscopic: a tavern, a military court, a tropical swamp, a prison cell, a boudoir, a peasant hut, a brothel, the splendid villas of the temporarily fortunate, the vermin-infested slums of the permanently wretched. And the story is a terrifying engine of savagery, destruction, suffering and despair. Yet in the midst of tragedy are moments of grotesque but haunting humor, and through its murk shine the most brilliant pinpoints of love and hope and humanity. Based on the record of the brutal Cabrera regime in Guatemala, this novel is a ferocious and shattering indictment of dictatorship in any land or time.

Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 - June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. He was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in literature ‘for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.’ Asturias was born in Guatemala City and died in Madrid, Spain. In 1904 his family moved from the capital to Salamá, Baja Verapaz, where they remained until 1908. In 1917, while studying law at the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (after a brief one-year flirtation with medicine), Asturias participated in the 1920 uprising against dictator Manuel Estrada Cabrera. He graduated in 1923 and went to Paris, France, to further his education at the Sorbonne. While living in Paris, he was influenced by the gathering of writers and artists in Montparnasse, and began writing poetry and fiction. Asturias returned to Guatemala in 1933 where he worked as a journalist before serving in his country’s diplomatic corps. When the government of President Jacobo Arbenz fell in 1954, he was banned from the country by Carlos Castillo Armas. While living in exile he became a well known author with the release of his novel, Mulata de Tal. Eventually, in 1966, democratically elected President Julio César Méndez Montenegro appointed him the ambassador to France, the same year he won the Lenin Peace Prize. Asturias spent his final years in Madrid, where he died in 1974. He is buried in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris. His son Rodrigo Asturias, under the nom de guerre Gaspar Ilom, was head of the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca, a unified rebel group during the Civil War in the 1980s, and after the peace accords 1996 became the group’s presidential candidate. In 1991, the Guatemalan writer Luis Cardoza y Aragón published ‘Miguel Angel Asturias, Casi Novela’ about their time together during the 1920s and 1930s in Paris.
Asturias, Miguel Angel. El Senor Presidente. New York. 1964. Atheneum. Translated from the Spanish by Francis Partridge. 288 pages. hardcover. Cover design by Everett Aison

Asturias has long been celebrated in Europe and Latin America as a writer of the highest stature. He writes in an extraordinary language of the most staggering vitality, full of symbolism and exotic metaphor, yet uncompromisingly realistic, as powerful and electrifying as a nightmare. EL SEÑOR PRESIDENTE is the story of a corrupt and dissolute Caribbean dictator, his henchmen and his victims. The killing of one of his sycophant generals provokes a political intrigue that can- not fail to touch everyone with blood: a halfwit beggar, shot after dragging his body, broken-limbed, through the wilderness for days; his derelict companions, tortured into false confessions; a government official’s wife, who watches her nursing infant die just beyond her reach, and is sold into prostitution; a timid court clerk, flogged to death for spilling ink on the President’s desk; even Angel Face, the President’s favorite, ‘As handsome and as evil as Satan.’ The scene is kaleidoscopic: a tavern, a military court, a tropical swamp, a prison cell, a boudoir, a peasant hut, a brothel, the splendid villas of the temporarily fortunate, the vermin-infested slums of the permanently wretched. And the story is a terrifying engine of savagery, destruction, suffering and despair. Yet in the midst of tragedy are moments of grotesque but haunting humor, and through its murk shine the most brilliant pinpoints of love and hope and humanity. Based on the record of the brutal Cabrera regime in Guatemala, this novel is a ferocious and shattering indictment of dictatorship in any land or time.

Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 - June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. He was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in literature ‘for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.’ Asturias was born in Guatemala City and died in Madrid, Spain. In 1904 his family moved from the capital to Salamá, Baja Verapaz, where they remained until 1908. In 1917, while studying law at the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (after a brief one-year flirtation with medicine), Asturias participated in the 1920 uprising against dictator Manuel Estrada Cabrera. He graduated in 1923 and went to Paris, France, to further his education at the Sorbonne. While living in Paris, he was influenced by the gathering of writers and artists in Montparnasse, and began writing poetry and fiction. Asturias returned to Guatemala in 1933 where he worked as a journalist before serving in his country’s diplomatic corps. When the government of President Jacobo Arbenz fell in 1954, he was banned from the country by Carlos Castillo Armas. While living in exile he became a well known author with the release of his novel, Mulata de Tal. Eventually, in 1966, democratically elected President Julio César Méndez Montenegro appointed him the ambassador to France, the same year he won the Lenin Peace Prize. Asturias spent his final years in Madrid, where he died in 1974. He is buried in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris. His son Rodrigo Asturias, under the nom de guerre Gaspar Ilom, was head of the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca, a unified rebel group during the Civil War in the 1980s, and after the peace accords 1996 became the group’s presidential candidate. In 1991, the Guatemalan writer Luis Cardoza y Aragón published ‘Miguel Angel Asturias, Casi Novela’ about their time together during the 1920s and 1930s in Paris.
Asturias, Miguel Angel. El Senor Presidente. New York. 1975. Atheneum. Translated by Frances Partridge.

Reprint. Originally published 1964.Asturias has long been celebrated in Europe and Latin America as a writer of the highest stature. He writes in an extraordinary language of the most staggering vitality, full of symbolism and exotic metaphor, yet uncompromisingly realistic, as powerful and electrifying as a nightmare. EL SEÑOR PRESIDENTE is the story of a corrupt and dissolute Caribbean dictator, his henchmen and his victims. The killing of one of his sycophant generals provokes a political intrigue that can- not fail to touch everyone with blood: a halfwit beggar, shot after dragging his body, broken-limbed, through the wilderness for days; his derelict companions, tortured into false confessions; a government official’s wife, who watches her nursing infant die just beyond her reach, and is sold into prostitution; a timid court clerk, flogged to death for spilling ink on the President’s desk; even Angel Face, the President’s favorite, ‘As handsome and as evil as Satan.’ The scene is kaleidoscopic: a tavern, a military court, a tropical swamp, a prison cell, a boudoir, a peasant hut, a brothel, the splendid villas of the temporarily fortunate, the vermin-infested slums of the permanently wretched. And the story is a terrifying engine of savagery, destruction, suffering and despair. Yet in the midst of tragedy are moments of grotesque but haunting humor, and through its murk shine the most brilliant pinpoints of love and hope and humanity. Based on the record of the brutal Cabrera regime in Guatemala, this novel is a ferocious and shattering indictment of dictatorship in any land or time.

Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 - June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. He was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in literature ‘for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.’ Asturias was born in Guatemala City and died in Madrid, Spain. In 1904 his family moved from the capital to Salamá, Baja Verapaz, where they remained until 1908. In 1917, while studying law at the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (after a brief one-year flirtation with medicine), Asturias participated in the 1920 uprising against dictator Manuel Estrada Cabrera. He graduated in 1923 and went to Paris, France, to further his education at the Sorbonne. While living in Paris, he was influenced by the gathering of writers and artists in Montparnasse, and began writing poetry and fiction. Asturias returned to Guatemala in 1933 where he worked as a journalist before serving in his country’s diplomatic corps. When the government of President Jacobo Arbenz fell in 1954, he was banned from the country by Carlos Castillo Armas. While living in exile he became a well known author with the release of his novel, Mulata de Tal. Eventually, in 1966, democratically elected President Julio César Méndez Montenegro appointed him the ambassador to France, the same year he won the Lenin Peace Prize. Asturias spent his final years in Madrid, where he died in 1974. He is buried in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris. His son Rodrigo Asturias, under the nom de guerre Gaspar Ilom, was head of the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca, a unified rebel group during the Civil War in the 1980s, and after the peace accords 1996 became the group’s presidential candidate. In 1991, the Guatemalan writer Luis Cardoza y Aragón published ‘Miguel Angel Asturias, Casi Novela’ about their time together during the 1920s and 1930s in Paris.
Asturias, Miguel Angel. Men of Maize. Pittsburgh. 1993. University Of Pittsburgh Press. 0822955148. Translated from the Spanish by Gerald Martin. 467 pages. paperback. Cover design by Kachergis Book Design. Cover illustration by Rudy Cotton.

‘Social protest and poetry; reality and myth; nostalgia for an uncorrupted, golden past; sensual human enjoyment of the present; ‘magic’ rather than lineal time, and, above all, a tender, compassionate love for the living, fertile, wondrous land and the struggling, hopeful people of Guatemala.’ - Saturday Review . . . ‘We are not accustomed, in Latin America, to critical work of this academic breadth on our literature.’ - Mario Vargas Llosa . . . Originally published in 1949, Men of Maize was the first great experiment in what critics now call ‘magical realism.’ It remains one of the most challenging Latin American novels to be published in this century. Gerald Martin’s masterful translation, with over 100 pages of explanatory notes, brings this significant work to the English-speaking reader. Mythological and historical, it traces the shattering impact of internal colonialism, private property, and market economics on the descendants of the Mayan Indians. Modernizers from the outside destroy a way of life based on corn as the sacred plant; ancestral customs and beliefs of the Mayans are buried beneath the debris of capitalism. Miguel Asturias was among the pioneers who sparked renewed critical interest in Latin American literature between the 19205 and 19405, a trailblazing modernist whose work led to the emergence of a distinctively Latin American style in succeeding decades. The Pittsburgh Editions of Latin American Literature are based on the Colección Archivos, a landmark series of critical editions of twentieth-century Latin American fiction, poetry, and essays. This important collection was created through agreements with the governments of France, Italy, Spain, Portugal, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, and Mexico, with funding provided by ALLCA and UNESCO. The translations in the Pittsburgh series will make this valuable influential body of literature accessible to North American readers.

Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 - June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. He was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in literature ‘for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.’ Asturias was born in Guatemala City and died in Madrid, Spain. In 1904 his family moved from the capital to Salamá, Baja Verapaz, where they remained until 1908. In 1917, while studying law at the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (after a brief one-year flirtation with medicine), Asturias participated in the 1920 uprising against dictator Manuel Estrada Cabrera. He graduated in 1923 and went to Paris, France, to further his education at the Sorbonne. While living in Paris, he was influenced by the gathering of writers and artists in Montparnasse, and began writing poetry and fiction. Asturias returned to Guatemala in 1933 where he worked as a journalist before serving in his country’s diplomatic corps. When the government of President Jacobo Arbenz fell in 1954, he was banned from the country by Carlos Castillo Armas. While living in exile he became a well known author with the release of his novel, Mulata de Tal. Eventually, in 1966, democratically elected President Julio César Méndez Montenegro appointed him the ambassador to France, the same year he won the Lenin Peace Prize. Asturias spent his final years in Madrid, where he died in 1974. He is buried in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris. His son Rodrigo Asturias, under the nom de guerre Gaspar Ilom, was head of the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca, a unified rebel group during the Civil War in the 1980s, and after the peace accords 1996 became the group’s presidential candidate. In 1991, the Guatemalan writer Luis Cardoza y Aragón published ‘Miguel Angel Asturias, Casi Novela’ about their time together during the 1920s and 1930s in Paris.
Asturias, Miguel Angel. Men of Maize. London. 1988. Verso. 086091190x. Translated from the Spanish by Gerald Martin. 335 pages. hardcover. Jacket designed by Paul Burcher. Jacket illustration by Paul Davis

Published in 1949, MEN OF MAIZE was the first great experiment in what critics now call ‘magical realism’. It remains one of the most challenging and significant Latin American novels to have appeared this century. Inextricably mythological and historical, it traces, with unsurpassed inventiveness and audacity, the shattering impact of internal colonialism, private property and market economics on the descendants of the Mayan Indians. Modernizers from the outside destroy a way of life based on corn as the sacred plant; the ancestral customs and beliefs of the Mayans become buried beneath the debris of capitalism. Asturias was able to convey his insight into the history and culture of the Middle American peoples through an extensive knowledge of contemporary world literature and thought, to produce a work of fiction comparable to those of Faulkner and Joyce - except that the unspoken cultural hero of MEN OF MAIZE is neither Jesus nor Ulysses but America’s more enigmatic Quetzalcoatl, a protagonist exploring past, present and future in search of the lost feminine Other.

Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 - June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. He was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in literature ‘for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.’ Asturias was born in Guatemala City and died in Madrid, Spain. In 1904 his family moved from the capital to Salamá, Baja Verapaz, where they remained until 1908. In 1917, while studying law at the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (after a brief one-year flirtation with medicine), Asturias participated in the 1920 uprising against dictator Manuel Estrada Cabrera. He graduated in 1923 and went to Paris, France, to further his education at the Sorbonne. While living in Paris, he was influenced by the gathering of writers and artists in Montparnasse, and began writing poetry and fiction. Asturias returned to Guatemala in 1933 where he worked as a journalist before serving in his country’s diplomatic corps. When the government of President Jacobo Arbenz fell in 1954, he was banned from the country by Carlos Castillo Armas. While living in exile he became a well known author with the release of his novel, Mulata de Tal. Eventually, in 1966, democratically elected President Julio César Méndez Montenegro appointed him the ambassador to France, the same year he won the Lenin Peace Prize. Asturias spent his final years in Madrid, where he died in 1974. He is buried in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris. His son Rodrigo Asturias, under the nom de guerre Gaspar Ilom, was head of the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca, a unified rebel group during the Civil War in the 1980s, and after the peace accords 1996 became the group’s presidential candidate. In 1991, the Guatemalan writer Luis Cardoza y Aragón published ‘Miguel Angel Asturias, Casi Novela’ about their time together during the 1920s and 1930s in Paris.
Asturias, Miguel Angel. Men of Maize. New York. 1975. Delacorte Press. 0440055830. Translated from the Spanish by Gerald Martin. A Seymour Lawrence Book. 337 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Paul Bacon.

The folklore and legends of the Guatemalan Indians overflow from this rich, swiftly moving novel. A mailman turns into a coyote and apparitions issue from the flames of burned-over cornfields. Woven in with the supernatural is the earthly struggle between the Indians and modernizers from the outside who slash and burn the land in order to produce corn in massive quantities. A way of life based upon corn as the sacred plant is coming to an end. In giving brilliant poetic expression to the beliefs of the Indian people, Asturias achieves heights as a stylist and innovator of language, comparable to Faulkner and Joyce.

Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 - June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. He was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in literature ‘for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.’ Asturias was born in Guatemala City and died in Madrid, Spain. In 1904 his family moved from the capital to Salamá, Baja Verapaz, where they remained until 1908. In 1917, while studying law at the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (after a brief one-year flirtation with medicine), Asturias participated in the 1920 uprising against dictator Manuel Estrada Cabrera. He graduated in 1923 and went to Paris, France, to further his education at the Sorbonne. While living in Paris, he was influenced by the gathering of writers and artists in Montparnasse, and began writing poetry and fiction. Asturias returned to Guatemala in 1933 where he worked as a journalist before serving in his country’s diplomatic corps. When the government of President Jacobo Arbenz fell in 1954, he was banned from the country by Carlos Castillo Armas. While living in exile he became a well known author with the release of his novel, Mulata de Tal. Eventually, in 1966, democratically elected President Julio César Méndez Montenegro appointed him the ambassador to France, the same year he won the Lenin Peace Prize. Asturias spent his final years in Madrid, where he died in 1974. He is buried in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris. His son Rodrigo Asturias, under the nom de guerre Gaspar Ilom, was head of the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca, a unified rebel group during the Civil War in the 1980s, and after the peace accords 1996 became the group’s presidential candidate. In 1991, the Guatemalan writer Luis Cardoza y Aragón published ‘Miguel Angel Asturias, Casi Novela’ about their time together during the 1920s and 1930s in Paris.
Asturias, Miguel Angel. Mulata. New York. 1982. Avon/Bard. 0380585529. Translated from the Spanish by Gregory Rabassa. 348 pages. paperback.

THE FLY WIZARD AND THE CORN DEVIL . . . One day the Fly Wizard - so called because of the way he dressed to gain attention — made a secret pact with the Corn Devil. In return for limitless wealth all the Fly Wizard had to do was expose himself at Mass so that women would, commit sin by looking at his private parts and then take Communion without confession. And, to add fuel to the fire, the priest would become so unnerved by the spectacle he would make mistakes during the Mass. The Fly Wizard did it and became so rich even his bones turned to gold. And that was just the beginning . . . MULATA is ample indication why Miguel A. Asturias was awarded the Nobel Prize. His genius is perhaps best described by Arts Magazine: ‘Imagine Hieronymous Bosch as a novelist, and you will have some idea of this most extraordinary of books.’ Le Monde called the author ‘A great writer.volcanic virtuousity . . . his characters have the force of nature.’ And the Saturday Review stated, ‘Asturias also has a robust vein of humor (Rabelaisian in nature), a strong predilection for the erotic, and the ability to carry one into the mythic world he creates by oscillating between the real and the mythic.’

Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 - June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. He was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in literature ‘for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.’ Asturias was born in Guatemala City and died in Madrid, Spain. In 1904 his family moved from the capital to Salamá, Baja Verapaz, where they remained until 1908. In 1917, while studying law at the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (after a brief one-year flirtation with medicine), Asturias participated in the 1920 uprising against dictator Manuel Estrada Cabrera. He graduated in 1923 and went to Paris, France, to further his education at the Sorbonne. While living in Paris, he was influenced by the gathering of writers and artists in Montparnasse, and began writing poetry and fiction. Asturias returned to Guatemala in 1933 where he worked as a journalist before serving in his country’s diplomatic corps. When the government of President Jacobo Arbenz fell in 1954, he was banned from the country by Carlos Castillo Armas. While living in exile he became a well known author with the release of his novel, Mulata de Tal. Eventually, in 1966, democratically elected President Julio César Méndez Montenegro appointed him the ambassador to France, the same year he won the Lenin Peace Prize. Asturias spent his final years in Madrid, where he died in 1974. He is buried in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris. His son Rodrigo Asturias, under the nom de guerre Gaspar Ilom, was head of the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca, a unified rebel group during the Civil War in the 1980s, and after the peace accords 1996 became the group’s presidential candidate. In 1991, the Guatemalan writer Luis Cardoza y Aragón published ‘Miguel Angel Asturias, Casi Novela’ about their time together during the 1920s and 1930s in Paris. Gregory Rabassa, the translator of MULATA, is a professor at Columbia University. He has translated other notable works of contemporary Latin American literature, including Hopscotch by Julio Cortázar, for which he received the National Book Award in 1967.
Asturias, Miguel Angel. Mulata. New York. 1967. Delacorte Press. Translated from the Spanish by Gregory Rabassa. 307 pages. hardcover.

Asturias is one of our major novelists for the vigor of his imagination, the audacity with which he complicates the interior structure of his tale and the violent or tender lyricism with which he evokes the lands of America.’ - Enrique Anderson Imbert, Harvard University . . . MULATA is a rich and gaudy novel from Latin America, steeped in Indian mythology, eroticism and surrealistic adventure, by a Guatemalan writer whose name is frequently mentioned for the Nobel Prize in Literature. MULATA is the story of the weird and hilarious apprenticeship of a mestizo couple in the priesthood of witchcraft. Celestino Yumi is a poor peasant known as the Fly Wizard who sells his wife to the god of corn in return for infinite wealth and a voluptuous Mulata. But the Mulata turns Out to be bisexual, a dangerous moon spirit. When he attempts to return to his first wife, Yumi is drawn into a vast struggle with all the gods of the legend. He and his wife visit the City of Magic, Tierrapaulita, where they undergo a series of transformations. The final struggle is a nightmare panorama with Indian forces pitted against distorted Christian powers.

Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 - June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. He was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in literature ‘for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.’ Asturias was born in Guatemala City and died in Madrid, Spain. In 1904 his family moved from the capital to Salamá, Baja Verapaz, where they remained until 1908. In 1917, while studying law at the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (after a brief one-year flirtation with medicine), Asturias participated in the 1920 uprising against dictator Manuel Estrada Cabrera. He graduated in 1923 and went to Paris, France, to further his education at the Sorbonne. While living in Paris, he was influenced by the gathering of writers and artists in Montparnasse, and began writing poetry and fiction. Asturias returned to Guatemala in 1933 where he worked as a journalist before serving in his country’s diplomatic corps. When the government of President Jacobo Arbenz fell in 1954, he was banned from the country by Carlos Castillo Armas. While living in exile he became a well known author with the release of his novel, Mulata de Tal. Eventually, in 1966, democratically elected President Julio César Méndez Montenegro appointed him the ambassador to France, the same year he won the Lenin Peace Prize. Asturias spent his final years in Madrid, where he died in 1974. He is buried in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris. His son Rodrigo Asturias, under the nom de guerre Gaspar Ilom, was head of the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca, a unified rebel group during the Civil War in the 1980s, and after the peace accords 1996 became the group’s presidential candidate. In 1991, the Guatemalan writer Luis Cardoza y Aragón published ‘Miguel Angel Asturias, Casi Novela’ about their time together during the 1920s and 1930s in Paris. Gregory Rabassa, the translator of MULATA, is a professor at Columbia University. He has translated other notable works of contemporary Latin American literature, including Hopscotch by Julio Cortázar, for which he received the National Book Award in 1967.
Asturias, Miguel Angel. Strong Wind. New York. 1969. Delacorte Press. Translated from the Spanish by Gregory Rabassa. 243 pages. hardcover. Cover: Paul Bacon. PHOTO COPYRIGHT BY Lutfi Ozkok.

STRONG WIND is the first volume of Miguel Angel Asturias’ controversial major work, the Banana Republic trilogy. The protagonist is the vast stretch of banana plantations in an unnamed Central American republic, and its domination by Tropical Banana, Inc., a powerful North American fruit company. Laid out with forbidding symmetry in the torrid malarial lowlands, the plantations burgeon with wealth and injustice. The peasant laborers are exploited until they drop, their women are raped, but still they pour down from the interior, dreaming of making their fortunes with the ‘ingots of green gold.’ The story, full of drama and epic excitement, concerns the uprising of the peasants against Tropical Banana, Inc., run invisibly by absentee investors and a sinister chairman known as the Green Pope. An idealistic North American couple encourages the uprising and are eventually destroyed in a tropical hurricane. The customs, the pace of life, the sorrows of these downtrodden people are conveyed vividly and with compassion. In the words of the Swedish Academy, upon awarding him the Nobel Prize, Asturias’ writings are ‘rooted in a national individuality and Indian traditions.’ . . . ACCLAIM FOR Miguel Angel Asturias - ‘Powerful realism and compassionate identification with the poor and the oppressed mark Asturias’ works, which are suffused with Guatemalan individuality, Mayan traditions and a sense of tragic destiny.’ - New York Times . . . ‘I have often wondered what would have happened to Keats if he had been born in the Amazon jungle. It seems to me that now I have the answer. He would have been the incarnation of Miguel Angel Asturias. No one has a more irrepressible imagination, or greater inventiveness, or a deeper sense of human tragedy.’ - Frank Tannenbaum, Institute of Latin American Studies, Columbia University . . . ‘ . . . rich in fantasy, lyric and baroque in expression, and infused with tender affection for the land and its people. Asturias also has a robust vein of humor (Rabelaisian in nature), a strong predilection for the erotic, and the ability to carry one into the magic world he creates by oscillating between the real and the mythic.’ - Saturday Review . . . ‘Asturias is one of our major novelists for the vigor of his imagination, the audacity with which he complicates the interior structure of his tale and the violent or tender lyricism with which he evokes the lands of America.’ - Enrique Anderson Imbert, Harvard University.

Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 - June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. He was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in literature ‘for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.’ Asturias was born in Guatemala City and died in Madrid, Spain. In 1904 his family moved from the capital to Salamá, Baja Verapaz, where they remained until 1908. In 1917, while studying law at the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (after a brief one-year flirtation with medicine), Asturias participated in the 1920 uprising against dictator Manuel Estrada Cabrera. He graduated in 1923 and went to Paris, France, to further his education at the Sorbonne. While living in Paris, he was influenced by the gathering of writers and artists in Montparnasse, and began writing poetry and fiction. Asturias returned to Guatemala in 1933 where he worked as a journalist before serving in his country’s diplomatic corps. When the government of President Jacobo Arbenz fell in 1954, he was banned from the country by Carlos Castillo Armas. While living in exile he became a well known author with the release of his novel, Mulata de Tal. Eventually, in 1966, democratically elected President Julio César Méndez Montenegro appointed him the ambassador to France, the same year he won the Lenin Peace Prize. Asturias spent his final years in Madrid, where he died in 1974. He is buried in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris. His son Rodrigo Asturias, under the nom de guerre Gaspar Ilom, was head of the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca, a unified rebel group during the Civil War in the 1980s, and after the peace accords 1996 became the group’s presidential candidate. In 1991, the Guatemalan writer Luis Cardoza y Aragón published ‘Miguel Angel Asturias, Casi Novela’ about their time together during the 1920s and 1930s in Paris.
Asturias, Miguel Angel. Strong Wind. New York. 1975. Dell. 044035997x. Translated by Gregory Rabassa. 224 pages. paperback.

Reprint. Originally published 1967. STRONG WIND is the first volume of Miguel Angel Asturias’ controversial major work, the Banana Republic trilogy. The protagonist is the vast stretch of banana plantations in an unnamed Central American republic, and its domination by Tropical Banana, Inc., a powerful North American fruit company. Laid out with forbidding symmetry in the torrid malarial lowlands, the plantations burgeon with wealth and injustice. The peasant laborers are exploited until they drop, their women are raped, but still they pour down from the interior, dreaming of making their fortunes with the ‘ingots of green gold.’ The story, full of drama and epic excitement, concerns the uprising of the peasants against Tropical Banana, Inc., run invisibly by absentee investors and a sinister chairman known as the Green Pope. An idealistic North American couple encourages the uprising and are eventually destroyed in a tropical hurricane. The customs, the pace of life, the sorrows of these downtrodden people are conveyed vividly and with compassion. In the words of the Swedish Academy, upon awarding him the Nobel Prize, Asturias’ writings are ‘rooted in a national individuality and Indian traditions.’ . . . ACCLAIM FOR Miguel Angel Asturias - ‘Powerful realism and compassionate identification with the poor and the oppressed mark Asturias’ works, which are suffused with Guatemalan individuality, Mayan traditions and a sense of tragic destiny.’ - New York Times . . . ‘I have often wondered what would have happened to Keats if he had been born in the Amazon jungle. It seems to me that now I have the answer. He would have been the incarnation of Miguel Angel Asturias. No one has a more irrepressible imagination, or greater inventiveness, or a deeper sense of human tragedy.’ - Frank Tannenbaum, Institute of Latin American Studies, Columbia University . . . ‘ . . . rich in fantasy, lyric and baroque in expression, and infused with tender affection for the land and its people. Asturias also has a robust vein of humor (Rabelaisian in nature), a strong predilection for the erotic, and the ability to carry one into the magic world he creates by oscillating between the real and the mythic.’ - Saturday Review . . . ‘Asturias is one of our major novelists for the vigor of his imagination, the audacity with which he complicates the interior structure of his tale and the violent or tender lyricism with which he evokes the lands of America.’ - Enrique Anderson Imbert, Harvard University.

Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 - June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. He was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in literature ‘for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.’ Asturias was born in Guatemala City and died in Madrid, Spain. In 1904 his family moved from the capital to Salamá, Baja Verapaz, where they remained until 1908. In 1917, while studying law at the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (after a brief one-year flirtation with medicine), Asturias participated in the 1920 uprising against dictator Manuel Estrada Cabrera. He graduated in 1923 and went to Paris, France, to further his education at the Sorbonne. While living in Paris, he was influenced by the gathering of writers and artists in Montparnasse, and began writing poetry and fiction. Asturias returned to Guatemala in 1933 where he worked as a journalist before serving in his country’s diplomatic corps. When the government of President Jacobo Arbenz fell in 1954, he was banned from the country by Carlos Castillo Armas. While living in exile he became a well known author with the release of his novel, Mulata de Tal. Eventually, in 1966, democratically elected President Julio César Méndez Montenegro appointed him the ambassador to France, the same year he won the Lenin Peace Prize. Asturias spent his final years in Madrid, where he died in 1974. He is buried in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris. His son Rodrigo Asturias, under the nom de guerre Gaspar Ilom, was head of the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca, a unified rebel group during the Civil War in the 1980s, and after the peace accords 1996 became the group’s presidential candidate. In 1991, the Guatemalan writer Luis Cardoza y Aragón published ‘Miguel Angel Asturias, Casi Novela’ about their time together during the 1920s and 1930s in Paris.
Asturias, Miguel Angel. The Bejeweled Boy. Garden City. 1971. Doubleday. Translated from the Spanish by Martin Shuttleworth. 189 pages. hardcover. Jacket design by Lydia Rosier

Like a bright kite, fighting the thread that binds it to the earth, El Alhajadito, or THE BEJEWELED Boy, searches for reality in a dream that cannot end. ‘Dear Lord,’ be cried, ‘I can never look into a mirror without believing that there’s something more there than I can see.’ In his little barn, away from the town, he has his own dreams, sensuous and childlike, and his own adventures. But back in the big house to which he must return, the whey-faced, pig-tailed servants scurry sourly about their endless tasks. The doors of the big house are always open, the beds are aired and made up with spotless linen. Plates of cakes and fruit, glasses of wine and liquor, boxes of cigars, hundreds of lamps to light at dusk, all these are kept in constant readiness, for El Alhajadito’s forbears never visibly died: they just disappeared~ The family sepulchre has remained empty all these generations, and the big house is kept in glowing readiness through the days and nights, awaiting the return of the Masters. To attempt a description of this novel is like trying to describe a Bunuel film: they are both apparently irrational, but in truth they are depictions of the veil which separates those two realities, the objective and the subjective, and they must both be experienced first hand.

Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 - June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. He was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in literature ‘for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.’ Asturias was born in Guatemala City and died in Madrid, Spain. In 1904 his family moved from the capital to Salamá, Baja Verapaz, where they remained until 1908. In 1917, while studying law at the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (after a brief one-year flirtation with medicine), Asturias participated in the 1920 uprising against dictator Manuel Estrada Cabrera. He graduated in 1923 and went to Paris, France, to further his education at the Sorbonne. While living in Paris, he was influenced by the gathering of writers and artists in Montparnasse, and began writing poetry and fiction. Asturias returned to Guatemala in 1933 where he worked as a journalist before serving in his country’s diplomatic corps. When the government of President Jacobo Arbenz fell in 1954, he was banned from the country by Carlos Castillo Armas. While living in exile he became a well known author with the release of his novel, Mulata de Tal. Eventually, in 1966, democratically elected President Julio César Méndez Montenegro appointed him the ambassador to France, the same year he won the Lenin Peace Prize. Asturias spent his final years in Madrid, where he died in 1974. He is buried in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris. His son Rodrigo Asturias, under the nom de guerre Gaspar Ilom, was head of the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca, a unified rebel group during the Civil War in the 1980s, and after the peace accords 1996 became the group’s presidential candidate. In 1991, the Guatemalan writer Luis Cardoza y Aragón published ‘Miguel Angel Asturias, Casi Novela’ about their time together during the 1920s and 1930s in Paris.
Asturias, Miguel Angel. The Cyclone. London. 1967. Peter Owen. Translated from the Spanish by Darwin Flakoll and Claribel Alegria. 238 pages.

The first of Asturias' famous 'Banana Trilogy,' all of which emphasize social and economic exploitation by a large North American fruit company.

Miguel Ángel Asturias Rosales (October 19, 1899 - June 9, 1974) was a Guatemalan writer and diplomat. He was awarded the 1967 Nobel Prize in literature ‘for his vivid literary achievement, deep-rooted in the national traits and traditions of Indian peoples of Latin America.’ Asturias was born in Guatemala City and died in Madrid, Spain. In 1904 his family moved from the capital to Salamá, Baja Verapaz, where they remained until 1908. In 1917, while studying law at the Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala (after a brief one-year flirtation with medicine), Asturias participated in the 1920 uprising against dictator Manuel Estrada Cabrera. He graduated in 1923 and went to Paris, France, to further his education at the Sorbonne. While living in Paris, he was influenced by the gathering of writers and artists in Montparnasse, and began writing poetry and fiction. Asturias returned to Guatemala in 1933 where he worked as a journalist before serving in his country’s diplomatic corps. When the government of President Jacobo Arbenz fell in 1954, he was banned from the country by Carlos Castillo Armas. While living in exile he became a well known author with the release of his novel, Mulata de Tal. Eventually, in 1966, democratically elected President Julio César Méndez Montenegro appointed him the ambassador to France, the same year he won the Lenin Peace Prize. Asturias spent his final years in Madrid, where he died in 1974. He is buried in the Cimetière du Père Lachaise in Paris. His son Rodrigo Asturias, under the nom de guerre Gaspar Ilom, was head of the Unidad Revolucionaria Nacional Guatemalteca, a unified rebel group during the Civil War in the 1980s, and after the peace accords 1996 became the group’s presidential