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Author birthdays

  • January 10th

    January 10th Americo De Almeida, Jose (Born  January 10, 1887)    JOSE AMERICO DE ALMEIDA was born in 1887 and lived in retirement in Joao Pessoa. His long life was devoted almost entirely to public service and literature. His first novel A Bagacei’ra (Trash, 1928) enjoyed enormous success. The first translation of the book to appear in any language was that of R. L. Scott-Buccleuch into English in 1978 and...

  • January 9th

    January 9th   Karel Capek (Born  January 9, 1890)    Karel Capek (January 9, 1890 - December 25, 1938) was one of the most influential Czech writers of the 20th century. Capek was born in Malé Svatonovice, Bohemia, Austria-Hungary (now Czech Republic). He wrote with intelligence and humour on a wide variety of subjects. His works are known for their interesting and precise descriptions of reality, and...

  • January 8th

    January 8th     Leonardo Sciascia (Born  January 8, 1921)    Leonardo Sciascia (January 8, 1921 – November 20, 1989) was an Italian writer, novelist, essayist, playwright and politician. Some of his works have been made into films, including Open Doors (1990) and Il giorno della civetta (1968). Sciascia was born in Racalmuto, Sicily. In 1935 his family moved to Caltanissetta; here Sciascia studied under...

Neglectedbooks.com

The Neglected Books Page

www.NeglectedBooks.com: Where forgotten books are remembered
  • “The Incendiary,” by Nina Frances Layard, from Poems (1890)
    The Incendiary Pull down the stars; Here let us have a game Of patent pattern; You bowl with Mars, And I will take an aim With belted Saturn. Come, lend a hand; The bright thing there is wasting, Not serving Hodges; Well make a stand, And give the star a basting: Till it dislodges. Well […]
  • The Debates Continues, by Margaret Campbell (Marjorie Bowen) (1939)
    Anyone with romantic fantasies about the life of a popular writer need only read Margaret Campbell’s autobiography The Debate Continues to get over them. Under such pseudonyms as Marjorie Bowen, Robert Paye, George R. Preedy, Joseph Shearing, and John Winch, she published over 150 books, many of them best-sellers in both the U.K. and U.S.. […]
  • This Was a Man: Some Memories of Robert Mannin, by Ethel Mannin (1952)
    Another feature of Hastings was a shop at the edge of the old town and the fishing quarters, with glass cases outside, full of every kind of shell, and boxes covered with shells, and shell necklaces, and shells painted with views; and dried starfish there were, and the hedgehog-like shells of sea-urchins, and shells like […]
  • The Visitors, by Mary McMinnies (1958)
    The odd, alien green tint of the cover of the U.S. edition of Mary McMinnie’s second novel, The Visitors is somehow appropriate for this long out-of-print book, for it manages to be, at the same time, both highly realistic–indeed, drearily, tediously, relentlessly realistic at times, the kind of realism that’s so convincing that it can […]
  • “Low Tide,” by Lynette Roberts, from The New British Poets
    Low Tide Every waiting moment is a fold of sorrow Pierced within the heart. Pieces of mind get torn off emotionally In large wisps. Like a waif I lie, stillbound to action: Each waiting hour I stare and see not, Hum and hear not, nor care I how long The lode mood lasts. My eyes […]
  • In the decade of your youth, from Un-American Activities, by Sally Belfrage (1991)
    Of course it’s possible to make generalizations about numbered ten-year slots, thought they don’t much work until after the fact. “We’re not in ‘the eighties,'” said Abbie Hoffman about a later decade, “we’re in a delicatessen in New York City.” You could say the fifties were the end of the era when chauvinism was still […]
  • Genevieve Taggard, Poet
    Does Genevieve Taggard qualify as a neglected writer? After all, her work appears in all the essential thick anthologies: Norton’s Anthology of Literature by Women; Oxford’s Anthology of Modern American Poetry; and the Library of America’s American Poetry : The Twentieth Century. She has her Wikipedia page, her Encyclopedia Britannica article, her page at the […]
  • Blood Memory, by Martha Graham and Martha: The Life and Work of Martha Graham, by Agnes De Mille (1991)
    I am not a follower of ballet or dance, but when I started leafing through Martha Graham’s autobiography, Blood Memory: An Autobiography, I soon found I had to keep going and finish it. Now, this is hardly what one would call great writing. Indeed, there are some suggestions that it was more dictated, to her […]
  • Innumerable shades of sweetness and anguish, from Not Under Forty, by Willa Cather
    Willa Cather is hardly a neglected writer, but even in the work some of the best-known writers, there are little gems that have been rattled off into a dusty corner by the thumping feet of their magna opera. This comes from an essay on Katherine Mansfield in Not Under Forty (1936), which was the last […]
  • I Know What I’d Do, by Alice Beal Parsons (1946)
    One has to wonder what the residents of Piermont, New York thought of Alice Beal Parsons. A writer and–for her day–a radical feminist, with a strong liberal tack to her politics, she bought a house–more like a cabin–on the slopes of Tallman Mountain (now a New York State Park in the late 1920s. Probably few […]

Three Percent - Literature in Translation

Three Percent - Article

A resource for international literature from the University of Rochester

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