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Democracy Now!

Democracy Now!

Democracy Now! is an independent daily TV & radio news program, hosted by award-winning journalists Amy Goodman and Juan González. We provide daily global news headlines, in-depth interviews and investigative reports without any advertisements or government funding. Our programming shines a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lifts up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. Democracy Now! is live weekdays at 8am ET and available 24/7 through our website and podcasts.

Words Without Borders

Words Without Borders

Words Without Borders:The Online Magazine of International Literature
  • Interviews with 2017 Man Booker International Prize Nominees
  • Eight Writers Share Their Must-Read Books from Vietnam and the Diaspora
  • First Read—From “Rhapsody in Quebec” by Akos Verboczy
  • On Translating “My Uncle,” by Pep Puig
  • The Watchlist: April 2017
  • The City and the Writer: In Mumbai with Chandrahas Choudhury
  • Intact at Last!—William Carlos Williams’s Translation of Nicolas Calas’s “To Voyage beyond the Past”
  • 2017 Man Booker International Prize Q&A—Dorthe Nors
  • 2017 Man Booker International Prize Q&A—Misha Hoekstra

New York Review of Books

The New York Review of Books

Recent items from nybooks.com
  • Should the Chinese Government Be in American Classrooms?
    While the rapid spread of Confucius Institutes in the US has been impressive, in recent years their unusual reach in the American higher education system has become increasingly controversial: these institutes are an official agency of the Chinese...
  • Can China Replace the West?
    Gideon Rachman’s Easternization, his new survey of a transformed Asia, admirably does what so little writing on foreign affairs attempts. It treats with equal facility economics, geopolitics, security, enough history for needed background,...
  • The Street with Trotsky’s Bones
    I told my children while pointing to the weirdly shaped Polyforum building, the three of us sitting down in the backseat of a cab, feeling a bit foreign in the city in which we had all been born but had not lived for a long time: “The guy who did...
  • The Virtuoso of Compassion
    The Caravaggio originals on display in an exhibition at the National Gallery in London demonstrate why the painter exerted such an overwhelming influence on patrons and colleagues alike, and why he is so passionately loved today.
  • France Against Itself
    In recent years, the traditional right has had to move rightward to stop its voters going over to Marine Le Pen. Watching Le Pen and former prime minister François Fillon on television, watching Fillon address a rally of five thousand people in...
  • Trump’s Travel Bans—Look Beyond the Text
    Imagine if a mayoral candidate promised repeatedly during a campaign that he would keep African-Americans out of the town, and then, upon election, adopted a policy barring entry from seven cities with populations that were 90 percent...
  • The Confidence Man of American Art
    Robert Rauschenberg was a showman, a trickster, a shaman, and a charmer. In the retrospective that recently closed at Tate Modern in London and will be arriving at the Museum of Modern Art in New York this May, museumgoers are confronted with many...
  • A Buffet of French History
    One of the bombs dropped during the current presidential campaign in France is Histoire mondiale de la France, an eight-hundred-page tome surveying 40,000 years of French history. A collaborative work written by 122 academics and directed by...
  • The Best Kind of Princess
    The three German Georgian graces who are the focus of the exhibition “Enlightened Princesses: Caroline, Augusta, Charlotte and the Shaping of the Modern World" brought far more to their adopted country than just political stability. They were all...

Neglectedbooks.com

The Neglected Books Page

www.NeglectedBooks.com: Where forgotten books are remembered
  • Many Are Called: Forty-Two Short Stories, by Edward Newhouse (1951)

    For a dozen years or so, starting in the late 1930s, Edward Newhouse was one of The New Yorker’s most prolific fiction writers, working with editor Gus Lobrano in an impressive stable that included John Cheever, Irwin Shaw, and Jerome Weidman. Granville Hicks rated Newhouse “high in the ranks of contemporary short-story writers,” and a... Read more

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  • The Girl in the Black Raincoat, edited by George Garrett (1966)

    Once upon a time, a student in one of George Garrett’s writing classes at the University of Virginia turned in a story about a girl in a black raincoat that was about a real girl in a black raincoat in the class. “It’s a good short story,” Garrett writes in the introduction to The Girl... Read more

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  • The Empress’s Ring, by Nancy Hale (1955)

    Nancy Hale was one of The New Yorker’s most prolific short story writers and author of a numerous well-received novels, including the 1942 best-seller, The Prodigal Women — and yet today, she’s virtually forgotten. She didn’t have a Wikipedia article until I just wrote one and her only work in print is a small sample... Read more

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  • The Stories of James Stern (1968)

    When James Stern died in 1993 at the age of 88, most of his obituaries acknowledged him as a writer but noted that he was better known as a friend to the famous. An early acquaintance of W. H. Auden, he went on to break bread and knock back whiskies with a fair share of... Read more

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  • “The Copley-Plaza,” from The Empress’s Ring, by Nancy Hale (1955)

    The next set of memories I bear of the Copley-Plaza are very different from these in mood. I must have been fourteen. I had been going to Miss Winsor’s School, out in Longwood, and I found it hard to make friends; as far as I could figure at that age, my total inability to play... Read more

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  • Stories, Fables and Other Diversions, by Howard Nemerov (1971)

    I was skeptical when I started reading the poet Howard Nemerov‘s 1971 collection, Stories, Fables and Other Diversions. It gave all the appearances of being a minor work–a writer working outside his primary form; an early volume from a small (if well-respected) press; short (barely 121 pages); a title suggesting nothing more than a hastily-applied... Read more

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  • Habeas Corpus, by Peter Green (1962)

    I’ve probably looked past a copy of the Signet paperback edition of Peter Green’s Habeas Corpus fifty times or more while browsing through used bookstores over the decades and looked right past it. But on the look-out for short story collections now and having the good fortune to spend an hour in one of Seattle’s... Read more

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  • The Thirteen Travellers, by Hugh Walpole (1920)

    I put off my plan to devote a year’s worth of posts to neglected short story writers and collections for a year when I realized that I wasn’t ready to leave my year of the neglected woman writer quite yet. So I stretched that year into two and have made a pretty poor start of... Read more

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  • Powers of the Weak, by Elizabeth Janeway (1980)

    I’ve written about many good books on this site over the years, but this may be the most important one, particularly now. Even when it was first published in 1980, Elizabeth Janeways’s Powers of the Weak was labelled as a feminist tract and fairly quickly dismissed and forgotten. Which was an apt demonstration of the... Read more

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  • Anna Wickham: Poetess and Landlady

    In the April 27, 1946 edition of Picture Post, a U. K. version of Life, an unusual three-page story was devoted to a poet who, even then, was two decades past her brief and limited fame. Anna Wickham struggled throughout her life against the control that men–first her father, then her husband, and finally, the... Read more

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