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Democracy Now!

Democracy Now!

Democracy Now! is an independent daily TV & radio news program, hosted by award-winning journalists Amy Goodman and Juan González. We provide daily global news headlines, in-depth interviews and investigative reports without any advertisements or government funding. Our programming shines a spotlight on corporate and government abuses of power and lifts up the stories of ordinary people working to make change in extraordinary times. Democracy Now! is live weekdays at 8am ET and available 24/7 through our website and podcasts.

Words Without Borders

Words Without Borders

Words Without Borders:The Online Magazine of International Literature
  • After Midnight

    Presented here for the first time in English, the cult writer Charles Chahwan—"Lebanon's answer to Charles Bukowski"—tells a tale of rival militiamen euphoric with violence.   Under the gentle

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  • The Watchlist: August 2018

    Each month, Tobias Carroll shares a handful of recently released or forthcoming titles in translation that he’s especially excited about.   From Riverhead | Flights by Olga Tokarczuk, translated

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  • 31 Recent Works by Women Writers to Read for #WITMonth

    As we celebrate Women in Translation Month, we’re looking back at exciting works by women writers from around the world published this past year. Here are 31 to add to your reading list for

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  • From “Pretty Things”

    In Virginie Despentes’s Pretty Things, translated from the French by Emma Ramadan and forthcoming from the Feminist Press, twins Claudine and Pauline hatch a plan to create the “perfect woman,”

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  • The City and the Writer: In Buenos Aires with Luciana Jazmín Coronado

    If each city is like a game of chess, the day when I have learned the rules, I shall finally possess my empire, even if I shall never succeed in knowing all the cities it contains. —Italo Calvino, Invisible

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  • A Second Birth: Argentine Master Norah Lange Gets Her Due

    Norah Lange’s People in the Room, translated by Charlotte Whittle and introduced by César Aira, is forthcoming from And Other Stories. You can read an excerpt from People in the

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  • Land of Contradictions: Writing in Macau Today

    Guest editor Jeremy Tiang kicks off our Macau issue with a look at the contradictions of this tiny yet complex territory and its literature Macau is tiny: an area of forty-five square miles, home to half a million

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  • Journey to Panama: Pamela Carmell and Christina Vega-Westhoff on the Panamanian Short Story

    The guest editors for Words Without Borders’s August feature of Panamanian short fiction discuss the project’s genesis and give readers an insider’s look at the country’s literary

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  • Dance with Death

    Panamanian writer Melanie Taylor Herrera looks on as two assassins kill time at a nightclub​.   Two men head for the table in front of the dance floor. They sit down in the aluminum chairs silently and in

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New York Review of Books

The New York Review of Books

Recent items from nybooks.com
  • Deradicalizing White People
    “Our government is normalizing white nationalism,” says Christian Picciolini, a former neo-Nazi skinhead now involved in deradicalization. “The rhetoric coming out of the White House is emboldening these people.” I have lost count of how many times...
  • Bangladesh’s Authoritarian Turn
    The renowned photojournalist Shahidul Alam is supposed to be in New York on October 28 to receive a humanitarian award from the Lucie Foundation, which honors photographers every year. There is no guarantee, however, that Alam will be able to...
  • Naipaul in the Review
    A life in literary criticism: how Review writers read and responded to the books of V.S. Naipaul (1932–2018). From 2002, Hilary Mantel: Perhaps what we will say about Naipaul was that he was the self-made man who didn’t stop at...
  • Seeing Red? Think Blue
    In 1980, I wrote my college newspaper endorsement of a man named Barry Commoner who was running for president. He was the candidate of the Citizens’ Party, a kind of precursor to the Greens, and since I was disgusted with both Carter and Reagan,...
  • V.S. Naipaul, Poet of the Displaced
    Naipaul was our greatest poet of the half-baked and the displaced. It was the imaginary wholeness of civilizations that sometimes led him astray. There is no such thing as a whole civilization. But some of Naipaul’s greatest literature came out of...
  • Between Hate, Hope, and Help: Haitians in the Dominican Republic
    Dominican politicians have successfully manipulated anti-Haitian feeling for political gain. Radio shows discuss the Haitian “invasion” that must be stopped at all costs. There is a widespread belief that Haiti is a failed state, and that the world...
  • The Big Melt
    Sometimes, it seems, threats to our future become so great that we opt to ignore them. Yet if we fail to act with the utmost urgency to slow climate change, we will invite catastrophe on all humanity.
  • Michael Jackson, King of Pop Art
    An exhibition at London's National Portrait Gallery gathers together the work of forty-eight disparate artists exploring the legacy of perhaps the most frequently depicted cultural figure in history, and his fame is their common palette. Michael...
  • In the Review Archives: 1980–1984
    To celebrate The New York Review’s fifty-fifth anniversary, we are featuring one article from each year of the magazine’s history. Today’s selection, from the early Eighties, includes Renata Adler’s infamous critique of Pauline Kael, an...

Neglectedbooks.com

The Neglected Books Page

www.NeglectedBooks.com: Where forgotten books are remembered
  • The Way Out of Berkeley Square, by Rosemary Tonks (1970)
    Rosemary Tonks is now known as the poet who disappeared, thanks to a 2009 BBC program (“The Poet Who Vanished”) and features in the Guardian, TLS, the London Review of Books, the Poetry Foundation and others following her death in May 2014 and the reissue that fall of Bedouin of the London Evening, a collection... Read more
  • Talk, the National Industry of Ireland, from Irish Literary Portraits, edited by W. R. Rodgers (1973)
    It was not only the well-known writers who had contributions to make; one is forever being surprised in Dublin by the high standard of knowledge displayed by ordinary citizens in any walk or on any level of life. I had many instances of this; as he pulled me a pint, a Dublin publican said to... Read more
  • A Man on the Roof, by Kathleen Sully (1961)
    I don’t think it qualifies as a spoiler to say that the man on the roof in A Man on the Roof is a ghost. Specifically, he’s Wilfred Clough, late husband of Peony. Obsessed with stamp collecting while living, he returns to haunt — or rather, berate — his wife after she sells his collection.... Read more
  • McCabe, by Edmund Naughton (1959)
    Edmund Naughton’s 1959 western, McCabe, is mainly mentioned as a footnote to Robert Altman’s first masterpiece, his 1971 film McCabe & Mrs. Miller. Reissued as a tie-in to the film when it came out, it’s been out of print for over three decades now and fetches some fairly steep prices. (My tip: the cheapest copies... Read more
  • A Man Talking to Seagulls, by Kathleen Sully (1959)
    Kathleen Sully uses death as punctuation in A Man Talking to Seagulls, a tale of one day in the life of Dundeston, a resort somewhere on the east coast of England. She opens the day with the body of a young woman washed up on the beach. Scratcher, a vagrant living in a shack on... Read more
  • The Club, by A. D. Wintle (1961)
    Lieutenant Colonel Alfred Daniel Wintle MC, or A. D. Wintle for short, was one of the great characters of the 20th century, a genuine war hero, egoist, eccentric, and defender of all things gentlemanly. He died before finishing his autobiography, but when his friend Alastair Revie condensed the million-some words of manuscript that Wintle left... Read more
  • Skrine, by Kathleen Sully (1960)
    None of the four novels by Kathleen Sully I’ve read so far is anything quite like the others, but I feel safe in saying that Skrine is the most unlike the rest. In fact, in his TLS review, Arthur-Calder Marshall observed that Sully’s critical reputation (back when she had one) would have been higher if... Read more
  • “Pass On!,” from “Can’t You Get Me Out of Here?” by Julia Strachey (1960)
    I’m not sure I can reprint the entirety of Julia Strachey’s one New Yorker piece, “Can’t You Get Me Out of Here,” which I mentioned in my post on Strachey’s autobiography (posthumously edited by Frances Partridge), without running afoul of someone’s copyright, but I can’t resist sharing its sublime opening: My father, whose failing eyesight......
  • Julia: A Portrait of Julia Strachey by Herself and Frances Partridge (1983)
    Julia Strachey is hardly forgotten. In 2009, Persephone Books reissued her 1932 novel Cheerful Weather for the Wedding with a cover featuring “Girl Reading,” a gorgeous painting by Harold Knight, and way back in 1978, Cheerful was reissued along with her 1951 novel The Man on the Pier (using her preferred title, An Integrated Man)......
  • My Name is Frank, by Frank Laskier (1942)
    I wrote about Frank Laskier’s fictionalized autobiography, Log Book, over six years ago, but it wasn’t until recently that I had the chance to read My Name is Frank, the collection of BBC broadcast talks that brought him to fame. Even slighter in length than Log Book, My Name is Frank still manages to carry... Read more
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